Friday 22 November 1667

Up betimes, and drinking my morning draught of strong water with Betty Michell, I had not opportunity para baiser la, I by water to White Hall, and there met Creed, and thence with him to Westminster Hall, where we talked long together of news, and there met with Cooling, my Lord Chamberlain’s Secretary, and from him learn the truth of all I heard last night; and understand further, that this stiffness of the Lords is in no manner of kindness to my Lord Chancellor, for he neither hath, nor do, nor for the future likely can oblige any of them, but rather the contrary; but that they do fear what the consequence may be to themselves, should they yield in his case, as many of them have reason. And more, he shewed me how this is rather to the wrong and prejudice of my Lord Chancellor; for that it is better for him to come to be tried before the Lords, where he can have right and make interest, than, when the Parliament is up, be committed by the King, and tried by a Court on purpose made by the King, of what Lords the King pleases, who have a mind to have his head. So that my Lord [Cornbury] himself, his son, he tells me, hath moved, that if they have Treason against my Lord of Clarendon, that they would specify it and send it up to the Lords, that he might come to his trial; so full of intrigues this business is! Having now a mind to go on and to be rid of Creed, I could not, but was forced to carry him with me to the Excise Office, and thence to the Temple, and there walked a good while in the Temple church, observing the plainness of Selden’s tomb, and how much better one of his executors hath, who is buried by him, and there I parted with him and took coach and home, where to dinner.

9 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Letters by Lord-Lieutenant Ormond from Dublin dated 22 November 1667

Ormond to Conway

The weight attached by friends in England to the complaints about quartering of soldiers has led the Duke to examine the Articles against Lord Strafford.
[ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Wentworth,_... ]

If quartering were a crime it would be found there, as a help to make up 'Treason'. But there is no trace of it. Only abuses supposed to be committed under colour of quartering, not the practice itself, is complained of even in the present Petition of the citizens of Dublin.
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Ormond to Conway

Imparts, at great length, particulars of the ancient practice of quartering troops in Dublin, and in other cities and towns of Ireland. ... Adds that there is not, in the Articles of charge against [his late friend] the Earl of Strafford, the least mention of that practice, as an offence. ... What "redress", then, can be given to a thing not complained of; practised without murmur; necessary for the safety of the Kingdom? ... Disorders doubtless have arisen thereout. ... None have been made known to the writer, without instant remedy to the person injured, & punishment to the offender. ...
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Ormond to Ossory

Further particulars concerning Barker's appeal case [ http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1667/08/28/#c30... ]; concerning the quartering of soldiers; and concerning claims to army commissioners, upon certain vacancies, or expected vacancies.
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Ormond to Arlington

... If measure is to be taken of the entertainment Irish complaints will receive from the Parliament [of England], by the success of Barker's petition ... the Parliament will not want work for some months, even if they should have no other.

... As to the accusations against the writer for quartering troops in Dublin, he might just as well be accused for having the sword and maces borne before him; the one having been done, as constantly as the other, by all the Governors of Ireland, as far back as memory will reach. ...

The Earl of Meath, who enjoys certain liberties in the suburbs of this city in right of a dissolved Abbey, has thought this a fit time to raise scandal ... upon the same account. ... Notice is added of what passed, at the Council Board, upon a complaint elsewhere made by Lord Meath, of words spoken by the writer.
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Ormond to Ossory

It appears that the great affair of Clarendon's impeachment has put some delay in the consideration of Barker's Appeal to the Parliament.

http://www.rsl.ox.ac.uk/dept/scwmss/projects/ca...

Paul Chapin   Link to this

Ormond: mistakes were made, but no crimes were committed, and anyway everybody else does it. The bleat of powerful men under sudden scrutiny throughout the ages.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"So that my Lord [Cornbury] himself, his son, he tells me, hath moved, that if they have Treason against my Lord of Clarendon, that they would specify it and send it up to the Lords, that he might come to his trial;"

L&M note the documentary confirmation of this in Grey's Debates, 16 October; which via the link above is: "Mr Lau. Hyde.] Moves, that rather than the Earl of Clarendon's case should set the two Houses at difference, the Earl may be brought to his tryal to answer the crimes objected against him." http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?co...

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...tried by a Court on purpose made by the King, of what Lords the King pleases, who have a mind to have his head."

A little reminder of how high the stakes are here...And how easily a little fellow like Sam could get caught in the whirlpool.

I wonder how much is genuine annoyance or even anger on Charles' part and how much running with the howling dogs hoping to avoid having them turn on him.

Dpm McCahill   Link to this

I wonder if wanting to be rid of Creed relates to the failure to "para baiser la" with Betty earlier.

djc   Link to this

wanting to be rid of Creed? perhaps to hear more of what Cooling has to say in private?

Horace Dripple   Link to this

"So full of intrigues this business is!" So well put.

djc   Link to this

"neither hath, nor do, nor for the future likely can ..."

what a fine phrase

cum salis grano   Link to this

And take thou this!' O thoughts of men accursed!
Past and to come seems best; things present worst.
ARCHBISHOP OF YORK
http://shakespeare.mit.edu/2henryiv/2henryiv.1....

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