Sunday 27 October 1667

(Lord’s day). Up, and to my office, there, with W. Hewer, to dictate a long letter to the Duke of York, about the bad state of the office, it being a work I do think fit for the office to do, though it be to no purpose but for their vindication in these bad times; for I do now learn many things tending to our safety which I did not wholly forget before, but do find the fruits of, and would I had practised them more, as, among other things, to be sure to let our answers to orders bear date presently after their date, that we may be found quick in our execution. This did us great good the other day before the Parliament. All the morning at this, at noon home to dinner, with my own family alone. After dinner, I down to Deptford, the first time that I went to look upon “The Maybolt,” which the King hath given me, and there she is; and I did meet with Mr. Uthwayte, who do tell me that there are new sails ordered to be delivered her, and a cable, which I did not speak of at all to him. So, thereupon, I told him I would not be my own hindrance so much as to take her into my custody before she had them, which was all I said to him, but desired him to take a strict inventory of her, that I might not be cheated by the master nor the company, when they come to understand that the vessel is gone away, which he hath promised me, and so away back again home, reading all the way the book of the collection of oaths in the several offices of this nation, which is worth a man’s reading, and so away home, and there my boy and I to sing, and at it all the evening, and to supper, and so to bed. This evening come Sir J. Minnes to me, to let me know that a Parliament-man hath been with him, to tell him that the Parliament intend to examine him particularly about Sir W. Coventry’s selling of places, and about my Lord Bruncker’s discharging the ships at Chatham by ticket: for the former of which I am more particularly sorry that that business of [Sir] W. Coventry should come up again; though this old man tells me, and, I believe, that he can say nothing to it.

6 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Ormond to the Lord Keeper Bridgeman
Written from: Kilkenny
Date: 27 October 1667

A letter written by the Duke to the Lord Keeper in September last was found still lying here (by the neglect of a servant) when its writer returned from Dublin. It was only written to express his particular satisfaction in his Lordship's access to the place he is now in.

http://www.rsl.ox.ac.uk/dept/scwmss/projects/ca...

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Methinks Lord Lieutenant Ormond(e)'s very worried about what this Parliament might due to him as well as to his friend and ally "the late Chancellor" -- very.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"After dinner, I down to Deptford, the first time that I went to look upon “The Maybolt,” which the King hath given me, and there she is..."

Pride of possession...

"I did meet with Mr. Uthwayte, who do tell me that there are new sails ordered to be delivered her, and a cable, which I did not speak of at all to him. So, thereupon, I told him I would not be my own hindrance so much as to take her into my custody before she had them, which was all I said to him, but desired him to take a strict inventory of her, that I might not be cheated by the master nor the company..."

Grim reality of ownershio...

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...though this old man tells me, and, I believe, that he can say nothing to it."

Ouch...Heavy on the sarcasm for poor Sir John. Still, good for Sir William.

Michael Robinson   Link to this

" ... reading all the way the book of the collection of oaths in the several offices of this nation, which is worth a man’s reading, ..."

The book of oaths, and the severall forms thereof, both antient and modern. Faithfully collected out of sundry authentike books and records, not heretofore extant, compiled in one volume. Very useful for all persons whatsoever, especially those that undertake any office of magistracie or publique imployment in the Common-wealth. Whereunto is added a perfect table.
Printed at London : for W. Lee, M. Walbancke, D. Pakeman, and G. Bedle, 1649.

12mo., [12], 96, 107-394, 405-416 p.
Wing (2nd ed.), G264. Thomason, E.1129[1], annotation on Thomason copy: "feb: 13 [illegible]"
Compilership sometimes attributed to Richard Garnet S.J.

Pepys retained:

The book of oaths· And the several forms thereof, both ancient and modern faithfully collected out of sundry authentick books of records, not heretofore extant. Very useful for all persons whatsoever, especially those that undertake any office of magistracy or publique imployment. Whereunto is added a perfect table.
London : printed for H. Twyford, T. Basset, B. Griffin, C. Harper, T. Sawbridge, S. Keble, G. Collins, J. Place, M. Wotton, and are to be sold in Fleetstreet and Holborn, 1689.

8vo., [16], 45, 44-78, 81-160, 191-206, 177-264 p.
Wing (CD-ROM, 1996), G265
PL 909

Reprint, London: 1715.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"Sir W. Coventry’s selling of places"

Rumored at least since October last: "[Sir] W. Coventry...did then tell me his speech lately to the House in his owne vindication about the report of his selling of places, he having a small occasion offered him by chance, which he did desire, and took, and did it to his content, and, he says, to the House’s seeming to approve of it by their hum. He confessed how long he had done it, and how he desired to have something else; and, since then, he had taken nothing, and challenged all the world." http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1666/10/04/

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