Tuesday 8 October 1667

Up pretty betimes, though not so soon as we intended, by reason of Murford’s not rising, and then not knowing how to open our door, which, and some other pleasant simplicities of the fellow, did give occasion to us to call him Sir Martin Marrall, and W. Hewer being his helper and counsellor, we did call him, all this journey, Mr. Warner, which did give us good occasion of mirth now and then. At last, rose, and up, and broke our fast, and then took coach, and away, and at Newport did call on Mr. Lowther, and he and his friend, and the master of the house, their friend, where they were, a gentleman, did presently get a-horseback and overtook us, and went with us to Audley-End, and did go along with us all over the house and garden: and mighty merry we were. The house indeed do appear very fine, but not so fine as it hath heretofore to me; particularly the ceilings are not so good as I always took them to be, being nothing so well wrought as my Lord Chancellor’s are; and though the figure of the house without be very extraordinary good, yet the stayre- case is exceeding poor; and a great many pictures, and not one good one in the house but one of Harry the Eighth, done by Holben; and not one good suit of hangings in all the house, but all most ancient things, such as I would not give the hanging-up of in my house; and the other furniture, beds and other things, accordingly.1 Only the gallery is good, and, above all things, the cellars, where we went down and drank of much good liquor; and indeed the cellars are fine: and here my wife and I did sing to my great content. And then to the garden, and there eat many grapes, and took some with us and so away thence, exceeding well satisfied, though not to that degree that, by my old esteem of the house, I ought and did expect to have done, the situation of it not pleasing me. Here we parted with Lowther and his friends, and away to Cambridge, it being foul, rainy weather, and there did take up at the Rose, for the sake of Mrs. Dorothy Drawwater, the vintner’s daughter, which is mentioned in the play of Sir Martin Marrall. Here we had a good chamber, and bespoke a good supper; and then I took my wife, and W. Hewer, and Willet, it holding up a little, and shewed them Trinity College and St. John’s Library, and went to King’s College Chapel, to see the outside of it only; and so to our inne, and with much pleasure did this, they walking in their pretty morning gowns, very handsome, and I proud to find myself in condition to do this; and so home to our lodging, and there by and by, to supper, with much good sport, talking with the Drawers concerning matters of the town, and persons whom I remember, and so, after supper, to cards; and then to bed, lying, I in one bed, and my wife and girl in another, in the same room, and very merry talking together, and mightily pleased both of us with the girl. Saunders, the only violin in my time, is, I hear, dead of the plague in the late plague there.

  1. Mr. George T. Robinson, F.S.A., in a paper on “Decorative Plaster Work,” read before the Society of Arts in April, 1891, refers to the ceilings at Audley End as presenting an excellent idea of the state of the stuccoer’s art in the middle of James I.’s reign, and adds, “Few houses in England can show so fine a series of the same date … The great hall has medallions in the square portions of the ceiling formed by its dividing timber beams. The large saloon on the principal floor-a room about 66 feet long by 30 feet wide-has a very remarkable ceiling of the pendentive type, which presents many peculiarities, the most notable of which, that these not only depend from the ceiling, but the outside ones spring from the walls in a natural and structural manner. This is a most unusual circumstance in the stucco work of the time, the reason for the omission of this reasonable treatment evidently being the unwillingness of the stuccoer to omit his elaborate frieze in which he took such delight” (“Journal Soc. of Arts,” vol. xxxix., p. 449)

15 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

John Evelyn's Diary

8th October, 1667. Came to dine with me Dr. Bathurst, Dean of Wells, President of Trinity College, sent by the Vice-Chancellor.of Oxford, in the name both of him and the whole University, to thank me for procuring [ from Henry Howard ] the inscriptions [ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arundel_marbles ], and to receive my directions what was to be done to show their gratitude to Mr. Howard
[ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Howard,_6th_... ]

http://bit.ly/d482SJ

Bradford   Link to this

Travel writing brings out another side of Pepys; what a happy entry, even though it must end with the plague.

Carl in Boston   Link to this

"Only the gallery is good, and, above all things, the cellars, where we went down and drank of much good liquor; and indeed the cellars are fine: and here my wife and I did sing to my great content."
Wonderful, wonderful, may we do so in our times as well. Let me not see into the future, this is well enough for me.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"talking with the Drawers concerning matters of the town, and persons whom I remember"

drawer \draw"er\, n.

1. One who, or that which, draws; as:
(a) One who draws liquor for guests; a waiter in a taproom. --Shak. Henry IV

http://www.dictionary.net/drawer

Barbara Long   Link to this

I'm totally bummed that this is the last entry on this site. I have enjoyed reading your excellent notes and comments which have been very helpful to me in navigating Sam's diary.

Mary   Link to this

Nil desperandum.

There's lots more to come - the diary doesn't end until 31st May 1669 - always provided that Phil is prepared to keep us all going until we reach the final entry.

Mary   Link to this

Sam's second thoughts on Audley End.

I'm amused by his judgment that little in the house (except the cellars) is anything like as fine as he had originally thought. His taste has certainly changed, if not necessarily been refined, since his last visit.

Grahamt   Link to this

Drawers:
As this is shown with a capital initial D, could it not be a surname, perhaps a mis-transcription of their hosts' name, the Drawwaters?

Terry Foreman   Link to this

The capital D on Drawers was an affectation of the 1893 edition of the Diary (L&M lack it), presumably to recognize an office.

Here we have Pepys chatting up the wait-staff about the usual suspects, the habitués of the Rose as he recalled them -- a quite appealing portrait of Our Boy at his most congenial.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

The capital D does preclude our imagining SP in discourse with the furniture.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

On a 1660 visit to Audley End House and its cellar Pepys found a "most excellent echo" when he played a flageolet: http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1660/02/27/

In October 1662 Pepys had conducted about this same tour of Cambridge university landmarks for Elizabeth, a servant and his brother Tom -- who fetched up an old friend: http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1662/10/15/

Michael Robinson   Link to this

"The house indeed do appear very fine, but not so fine as it hath heretofore to me; particularly the ceilings are not so good as I always took them to be, being nothing so well wrought as my Lord Chancellor’s are; ..."

Series of interior and exterior views of Audley End, House and village:

http://viewfinder.english-heritage.org.uk/searc...

Note the surviving interiors were modified, c 1760, and then additional rooms and ceilings added or altered, by Adam, c 1775. The stable block is the grandest surviving from the C 17th., but the interior fittings date c 1880-1900. There is mention of this in some, but not all, of the individual picture captions.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...here my wife and I did sing to my great content."

Well, a possible new career as the Singing Pepys should the Naval Office be shut down.

I wonder if there was an echo...

David Baxter   Link to this

The Mr Warner referred to is Sir Martin Marrall’s man in the play whose efforts to assist his master to win the hand of Mistress Millisent are continually thwarted by Sir Martin’s foolishness. Warner’s aim is to get Mistress Millisent for his master, then “After this exploit, I will have Lilly draw me in the habit of a hero, with a laurel on my temples, and an inscription below it; This is Warner, the flower of serving-men.”

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