Saturday 27 July 1667

Up and to the office, where I hear that Sir John Coventry is come over from Bredah, a nephew, I think, of Sir W. Coventry’s: but what message he brings I know not. This morning news is come that Sir Jos. Jordan is come from Harwich, with sixteen fire-ships and four other little ships of war: and did attempt to do some execution upon the enemy, but did it without discretion, as most do say, so as that they have been able to do no good, but have lost four of their fire ships. They attempted [this], it seems, when the wind was too strong, that our grapplings could not hold: others say we come to leeward of them, but all condemn it as a foolish management. They are come to Sir Edward Spragg about Lee, and the Dutch are below at the Nore. At the office all the morning; and at noon to the ‘Change, where I met Fenn; and he tells me that Sir John Coventry do bring the confirmation of the peace; but I do not find the ‘Change at all glad of it, but rather the worse, they looking upon it as a peace made only to preserve the King for a time in his lusts and ease, and to sacrifice trade and his kingdoms only to his own pleasures: so that the hearts of merchants are quite down. He tells me that the King and my Lady Castlemayne are quite broke off, and she is gone away, and is with child, and swears the King shall own it; and she will have it christened in the Chapel at White Hall so, and owned for the King’s, as other Kings have done; or she will bring it into White Hall gallery, and dash the brains of it out before the King’s face.1 He tells me that the King and Court were never in the world so bad as they are now for gaming, swearing, whoring, and drinking, and the most abominable vices that ever were in the world; so that all must come to nought. He told me that Sir G. Carteret was at this end of the town; so I went to visit him in Broad Street; and there he and I together: and he is mightily pleased with my Lady Jem’s having a son; and a mighty glad man he is. He [Sir George Carteret] tells me, as to news, that the peace is now confirmed, and all that over. He says it was a very unhappy motion in the House the other day about the land-army; for, whether the King hath a mind of his own to do the thing desired or no, his doing it will be looked upon as a thing done only in fear of the Parliament. He says that the Duke of York is suspected to be the great man that is for raising of this army, and bringing things to be commanded by an army; but he believes that he is wronged, and says that he do know that he is wronged therein. He do say that the Court is in a way to ruin all for their pleasures; and says that he himself hath once taken the liberty to tell the King the necessity of having, at least, a show of religion in the Government, and sobriety; and that it was that, that did set up and keep up Oliver, though he was the greatest rogue in the world, and that it is so fixed in the nature of the common Englishman that it will not out of him. He tells me that while all should be labouring to settle the kingdom, they are at Court all in factions, some for and others against my Lord Chancellor, and another for and against another man, and the King adheres to no man, but this day delivers himself up to this, and the next to that, to the ruin of himself and business; that he is at the command of any woman like a slave, though he be the best man to the Queene in the world, with so much respect, and never lies a night from her: but yet cannot command himself in the presence of a woman he likes. Having had this discourse, I parted, and home to dinner, and thence to the, office all the afternoon to my great content very busy. It raining this day all day to our great joy, it having not rained, I think, this month before, so as the ground was everywhere so burned and dry as could be; and no travelling in the road or streets in London, for dust. At night late home to supper and to bed.

  1. Charles owned only four children by Lady Castlemaine-Anne, Countess of Sussex, and the Dukes of Southampton, Grafton, and Northumberland. The last of these was born in 1665. The paternity of all her other children was certainly doubtful. See pp. 50,52.

14 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Brodrick to Ormond
Written from: [London]
Date: 27 July 1667

Last night, Sir John Coventry [ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Coventry ] arrived from Breda, with the 'Articles of Peace', as signed on 21/31 current.

... It seems the French dealt very frankly, since the Alternative was consented to, in the utmost latitude, although in the debates they juggled. ...

... The Dutch & Swedes are not only agreed in the main, but even in the circumstances of their pretensions, & their private Articles are signed.

... The enclosed ... verses he [Sir John Denham http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/1676/ ] writ, "to redeem himself from the scandal of being reputed a philosopher, by his Majesty, for his graven copy, 'Of Love'. With this, he would have given me that, had he not presumed that my Lord Ossory ... had [already] transmitted ... a copy. This, he says, is so gay & airy, that his Majesty sings it every evening to the tune of 'Which nobody can deny'. His entire 'Poems' modest or immodest,- at least as many as can be collected, for he never kept [the] originals, save of 'Cooper's Hill', & the "2nd book of Virgil's Aeneas- will be shortly in print.
_____

Anglesey to Ormond
Written from: London
Date: 27 July 1667

Has received the Lord Lieutenant's letter of July 16. ... With all that the writer & his assistants can do, in urging the need of it, they "cannot yet get the money for Ireland settle". ...

The House of Commons passed a vote, nemine contradicente, to desire the King to disband the new raised army ... We now grow too hard for the Dutch in the Thames, and have lately destroyed eleven of their fireships, and a frigate or two,- as 'tis written ...

http://www.rsl.ox.ac.uk/dept/scwmss/projects/ca...

Michael L   Link to this

[Lady Castlemaine] is gone away, and is with child, and swears the King shall own it; ... or she will bring it into White Hall gallery, and dash the brains of it out before the King’s face.

Wow, she sure is quite the Drama Courtesan.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"It raining this day all day to our great joy, it having not rained, I think, this month before, so as the ground was everywhere so burned and dry as could be; and no travelling in the road or streets in London, for dust."

L&M note L. & T. Wood (Life and times of Anthony Wood) report the first half of July in Oxford was the hottest in memory -- 'several scolars mad, with heat and strong drink.'

(What's new?!)

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...they looking upon it as a peace made only to preserve the King for a time in his lusts and ease, and to sacrifice trade and his kingdoms only to his own pleasures..."

Well, he did start the war in part to please them [the merchants].

Terrible plague, devastating fire, a military disaster at the home base, a humiliating peace...I think I'd feel like a little heavy drinking, gambling, etc.

***
"the King and my Lady Castlemayne are quite broke off, and she is gone away, and is with child, and swears the King shall own it; and she will have it christened in the Chapel at White Hall so, and owned for the King’s, as other Kings have done; or she will bring it into White Hall gallery, and dash the brains of it out before the King’s face."

Babs, you're all class...

Michael L   Link to this

"... he is at the command of any woman like a slave, though he be the best man to the Queene in the world, with so much respect, and never lies a night from her: but yet cannot command himself in the presence of a woman he likes."

This sounds like someone we know. Do you suppose Sam just happens to be of similar temperament and behavior, or could he be (consciously or not) taking the King as an example to live by?

Mary   Link to this

official bastards

An L&M footnote revises the figures for Charles's acknowledged children by Castlemaine to 6 infants born between 1661 and 1672. None of those born around this particular time in the diary were acknowledged by him. Not unreasonable of Charles, as Barbara was having an affaire with Henry Jermyn, the Duke of York's Master of the Horse.

Ruben   Link to this

From John Fenn's apocryphal diary, I just find bundled with my morning paper:
"at noon to the ‘Change, where I met Pepys; and he tells me that Sir John Coventry...but I do not find the ‘Change at all glad of it, but rather the worse,...He tells me that the King and my Lady Castlemayne...He tells me that the King and Court ..."

Lgraz   Link to this

Has anyone a link to a drawing, painting, etc. of what the Navy Office buildings and/or Pepys' home looked like? Thanks.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"what the Navy Office buildings and/or Pepys’ home looked like"

Peter Easton, in his In Depth Article, "Samuel Pepys and Fleet Street" Posted: Wednesday 21 September 2005 http://www.pepysdiary.com/indepth/2005/09/21/sa... provided this image of The Navy Office as Pepys would have known it (from 1714 engraving). http://www.pepysdiary.com/static/img/indepth/20...

We don't have a contemporaneous image.

Mary   Link to this

1714 engraving of The Navy Office.

The Navy Office in which the diarist Pepys worked and lived burnt down in 1673. This engraving shows the building that was erected in its place. Thus Pepys would have known this version of the Navy Office during his later years of such employment, but it is not the office in which he worked during the diary period.

Ruben   Link to this

Brampton is still there. Good images at http://www.pepys.info/bramho.html
The library at Magdalene College, Cambridge was built years after Pepys passed away but the books Pepys treasured and the bookcases his carpenter (did he pay or the Naval Office payed for them?) built for him are there to be admired. And the desk. They really are what Pepys wanted us to be remembered for. (As every one that loves books and knowledge will tell you).
And you can look for the 128-9 funeral rings that were given away by his request to mourners the day Pepys was buried. See:"The art of death: visual culture in the English death ritual, page 86 http://books.google.co.il/books?id=mn9FeXHqvskC... and better illustrations at http://urngarden.com/cremationblog/2009/12/08/c... ) Interesting to note that our Samuel spent more than a 100 L for the rings!
This rings were of 3 different qualities, depending on to whom they were given.
The 14 Apr 2004 I posted the adress of the ring image but I can not open it anymore. It was at the Museum of London.
At http://www.museumoflondon.org.uk/archive/exhibi... you can see Pepys image and a memento mori ring but the interpretation does not say if this ring comes from Pepys funeral or it is only a specimen to show how it looked like.
And the St Olave Church were Samuel and his wife's rest is there to be seen.
Somewhere in this blog you will find all these images.

FJA   Link to this

I have never been to London. Can anyone hazard a guess for me as to how much time on average it might have taken our Sam to walk from the Navy Office to Westminster Hall?

tonyt   Link to this

From the Navy Office (Seething Lane) to Westminster Hall is about 2.5 miles. So perhaps 1 hour since much of the route was heavily built up (or had been before the Great Fire) but this is really no more than speculation.

Depending on the state of the tide, it could have been much quicker to take a boat on the River Thames

FJA   Link to this

Thank you, tonyt. I know Sam often goes by wheels or water, but I've been wondering about the scale of time and distance when he walks.

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