Friday 29 June 1666

Up, and within doors most of the morning, sending a porter (Sanders) up and down to several people to pay them money to clear my month’s debts every where, being mighty desirous to have all clear so soon as I can, and to that end did so much in settling my Tangier accounts clear. At noon dined, having first been down at Deptford and did a little business there and back again. After dinner to White Hall to a Committee of Tangier, but I come a little too late, they were up, so I to several places about business, among others to Westminster Hall, and there did meet with Betty Michell at her own mother’s shop. I would fain have carried her home by water, but she was to sup at that end of the town. So I away to White Hall, and thence, the Council being up, walked to St. James’s, and there had much discourse with Sir W. Coventry at his chamber, who I find quite weary of the warr, decries our having any warr at all, or himself to have been any occasion of it, that he hopes this will make us shy of any warr hereafter, or to prepare better for it, believes that one overthrow on the Dutch side would make them desire peace, and that one on ours will make us willing to accept of one: tells me that Commissioner Pett is fallen infinitely under the displeasure of the Prince and Duke of Albemarle, not giving them satisfaction in the getting out of the fleete, and that the complaint he believes is come to the King, and by Sir W. Coventry’s discourse I find he do concur in it, and speaks of his having of no authority in the place where he is, and I do believe at least it will end in his being removed to some other yarde, and I am not sorry for it, but do fear that though he deserves as bad, yet at this time the blame may not be so well deserved. Thence home and to the office; where I met with a letter from Dover, which tells me (and it did come by expresse) that newes is brought over by a gentleman from Callice that the Dutch fleete, 130 sail, are come upon the French coast; and that the country is bringing in picke-axes, and shovells, and wheel- barrows into Callice; that there are 6,000 men armed with head, back, and breast (Frenchmen) ready to go on board the Dutch fleete, and will be followed by 12,000 more. That they pretend they are to come to Dover; and that thereupon the Governor of Dover Castle is getting the victuallers’ provision out of the towne into the Castle to secure it. But I do think this is a ridiculous conceit; but a little time will show. At night home to supper and to bed,

6 Annotations

Mary   Link to this

....and speaks of his having no authority in the place where he is....

I take it that this 'he' and those following in this sentence relate to Pett.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"I would fain have carried her home by water..."

Dear ole "uncle" Sam... I suppose one could at least claim for the moment that he has more tact than Uncle Wight.

Spoiler...

However in future...Apologies to Uncle Wight...At least the sad ole fellow offers to pay up front and takes nothing (that we know of) without cash down, whereas our little hero...

***
"...much discourse with Sir W. Coventry at his chamber, who I find quite weary of the warr, decries our having any warr at all, or himself to have been any occasion of it, that he hopes this will make us shy of any warr hereafter, or to prepare better for it, believes that one overthrow on the Dutch side would make them desire peace, and that one on ours will make us willing to accept of one: tells me that Commissioner Pett is fallen infinitely under the displeasure of the Prince and Duke of Albemarle, not giving them satisfaction in the getting out of the fleete, and that the complaint he believes is come to the King, and by Sir W. Coventry’s discourse I find he do concur in it, and speaks of his having of no authority in the place where he is, and I do believe at least it will end in his being removed..."

It appears Defeat is not, in fact, an orphan.

GrahamT   Link to this

"I would fain have carried her home by water,"
The link under "home" points to Sam's home, whereas I think it more likely he was offering her a lift to her home.

JWB   Link to this

"But I do think this is a ridiculous conceit;"

Like U.S. Grant, in war believe only what you see.

A. Hamilton   Link to this

"and I am not sorry for it, but do fear that though he [Pett] deserves as bad, yet at this time the blame may not be so well deserved."

Sam's wary eye on Coventry/Court, sensing they seek a scapegoat. As RG suggests, defeat is "not, in fact, an orphan."

Michael Robinson   Link to this

" ... who I find quite weary of the warr, decries our having any warr at all, or himself to have been any occasion of it, ..."

This is consistent with SP's reports of Coventry's conversation in the period immediately prior to the start of hostilities:

"But it is pretty to see what he says, that those here that are forward for a warr at Court, they are reported in the world to be only designers of getting money into the King’s hands, they that elsewhere are for it have a design to trouble the kingdom and to give the Fanatiques an opportunity of doing hurt, and lastly those that are against it (as he himself for one is very cold therein) are said to be bribed by the Dutch."
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1664/04/13/

" ... he and I did long discourse together of the business of the office, and the warr with the Dutch; and he seemed to argue mightily with the little reason that there is for all this. ... He do, as to the effect of the warr, tell me clearly that it is not any skill of the Dutch that can hinder our trade if we will, we having so many advantages over them, of winds, good ports, and men; but it is our pride, and the laziness of the merchant. He seems to think that there may be some negotiation which may hinder a warr this year, but that he speaks doubtfully as unwilling I perceive to be thought to discourse any such thing."
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1664/05/29/

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