Thursday 21 June 1666

Up, and at the office all the morning; whereby several circumstances I find Sir W. Coventry and the Duke of Albemarle do not agree as they used to do; Sir W. Coventry commending Aylett (in some reproach to the Duke), whom the Duke hath put out for want of courage; and found fault with Steward, whom the Duke keeps in, though as much in fault as any commander in the fleete. At noon home to dinner, my father, sister, and wife dining at Sarah Giles’s, poor woman, where I should have been, but my pride would not suffer me. After dinner to Mr. Debasty’s to speake with Sir Robert Viner, a fine house and a great many fine ladies. He used me mighty civilly. My business was to set the matter right about the letter of credit he did give my Lord Belassis, that I may take up the tallys lodged with Viner for his security in the answering of my Lord’s bills, which we did set right very well, and Sir Robert Viner went home with me and did give me the 5000l. tallys presently. Here at Mr. Debasty’s I saw, in a gold frame, a picture of a Fluter playing on his flute which, for a good while, I took for paynting, but at last observed it a piece of tapestry, and is the finest that ever I saw in my life for figures, and good natural colours, and a very fine thing it is indeed. So home and met Sir George Smith by the way, who tells me that this day my Lord Chancellor and some of the Court have been with the City, and the City have voted to lend the King 100,000l.; which, if soon paid (as he says he believes it will), will be a greater service than I did ever expect at this time from the City. So home to my letters and then with my wife in the garden, and then upon our leades singing in the evening and so to supper (while at supper comes young Michell, whose wife I love, little Betty Howlet, to get my favour about a ticket, and I am glad of this occasion of obliging him and give occasion of his coming to me, for I must be better acquainted with him and her), and after supper to bed.

6 Annotations

cgs   Link to this

veddy interesting item
"...about the letter of credit he did give my Lord Belassis..."
So popular for business transactions up to the 1970's, a common way of getting goods to other banking zones.

cgs   Link to this

c. letter of credit: a document recommending the bearer to confidence; = letter of credence.
[See also 10b.]
1582 LICHEFIELD tr. Castanheda's Conq. E. Ind. 2a, Hee gaue them a Letter of credite. 1632 J. HAYWARD tr. Biondi's Eromena 137 He despatch'd him away in a frigat with letters of credit.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"(while at supper comes young Michell, whose wife I love, little Betty Howlet, to get my favour about a ticket, and I am glad of this occasion of obliging him and give occasion of his coming to me, for I must be better acquainted with him and her)..."

Spoiler...

Step two in Sam's perfect seduction plan...

Maybe he could get Halys to draw cartoons like Stanley Ford's in "How to Murder Your Wife".

Run, Betty...Run! "Uncle" Sam's intentions are not honorable.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"whereby several circumstances I find Sir W. Coventry and the Duke of Albemarle do not agree as they used to do"

Confirming what Sir G. Carteret told him the day before yesterday, that there had been "some high words between the Generall and Sir W. Coventry." http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1666/06/19/

Perhaps their disagreement over how the Four Days Battle was conducted is infecting other issues?

Nix   Link to this

"Sir W. Coventry and the Duke of Albemarle do not agree as they used to do; Sir W. Coventry commending Aylett (in some reproach to the Duke), whom the Duke hath put out for want of courage; and found fault with Steward, whom the Duke keeps in, though as much in fault as any commander in the fleete." --

"Victory has a thousand fathers, but defeat is an orphan." -- John F. Kennedy

Australian Susan   Link to this

Nice one, Nix!

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