Sunday 11 February 1665/66

(Lord’s day). Up, and put on a new black cloth suit to an old coate that I make to be in mourning at Court, where they are all, for the King of Spayne. —[Philip IV., who died September 17th, 1665.]— To church I, and at noon dined well, and then by water to White Hall, carrying a captain of the Tower (who desired his freight thither); there I to the Parke, and walked two or three turns of the Pell Mell with the company about the King and Duke; the Duke speaking to me a good deal. There met Lord Bruncker and Mr. Coventry, and discoursed about the Navy business; and all of us much at a loss that we yet can hear nothing of Sir Jeremy Smith’s fleete, that went away to the Streights the middle of December, through all the storms that we have had since, that have driven back three or four of them with their masts by the board. Yesterday come out the King’s Declaration of War against the French, but with such mild invitations of both them and the Dutch to come over hither with promise of their protection, that every body wonders at it. Thence home with my Lord Bruncker for discourse sake, and thence by hackney coach home, and so my wife and I mighty pleasant discourse, supped and to bed. The great wound I had Wednesday last in my thumb having with once dressing by Mrs. Turner’s balsam been perfectly cured, whereas I did not hope to save my nail, whatever else ill it did give me. My wife and I are much thoughtfull now-a-days about Pall’s coming up in order to a husband.

13 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"we yet can hear nothing of Sir Jeremy Smith's fleete, that went away to the Streights the middle of December, through all the storms that we have had since, that have driven back three or four of them with their masts by the board."

See 10 January 1665/66 for "newes, that by storms Sir Jer. Smith’s fleet is scattered, and three of them come without masts back to Plymouth, which is another very exceeding great disappointment, and if the victualling ships are miscarried will tend to the losse of the garrison of Tangier." http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1666/01/10/

Go by the board.

Meaning

Finished with, as in thrown overboard.

Origin

The board is the side or the decking of a ship. In common with many nautical phrases, go by the board dates back to the 17th century. Most of the early references to this phrase relate to masts of sailing ships which had fallen 'by the board'. For example, John Taylor's Works, 1603:

"In this fight their Reare-Admirals Maine Mast was shot by the boord."

The London Gazette No. 60/3, 1666:

"Our Main-stay, and our Main Top-Mast came all by the board."

It isn't clear exactly whether the phrase 'go by the board' originated with the meaning 'gone over the side' or 'fallen onto the deck'. The usually definitive Admiral William Henry Smyth gives equivocal meanings in his listing of the term in The Sailor's Word-book: An Alphabetical Digest of Nautical Terms, 1865:

"By the board. Over the ship's side. When a mast is carried away near the deck it is said to go by the board."

The figurative use of the phrase began in the mid 19th century. For example, this early citation, from The Gettysburg Republican Compiler, November 1837:

"Those banks that do not resume speedily will go by the board."

[ ** Timely, all-too-timely observation!! ** ]

Items which go by the board could be said to be jetsam -

http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/by-the-board...

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Seems the charms of domestic life have reclaimed our wayward boy for the moment... Nice that he considers Bess a partner to some extent at least in things like Pall's settlement, much as poor Pall would likely be distressed.

Todd Bernhardt   Link to this

"Yesterday come out the King’s Declaration of War against the French, but with such mild invitations of both them and the Dutch to come over hither with promise of their protection, that every body wonders at it."

Anyone have access to this, to help explain what he means here? Thank you in advance.

cape henry   Link to this

"Yesterday come out the King’s Declaration of War against the French, but with such mild invitations of both them and the Dutch to come over hither with promise of their protection, that every body wonders at it." (Including me.)This seems to me like one of those periodic pas de deux between Charles and Louis which amount to nothing. But I'll bet one of our scholars can fill us in on this. (Once again I see that TB and I are asking the same question.)

Ralph Berry   Link to this

Yesterday DiPhi raised the question of Sam and Bess's sleeping arrangements. I had assumed usually they slept apart because Sam has reffered to his, not our chamber, and he has also reffered to his wife's chamber.

However today with his comment "my wife and I mighty pleasant discourse, supped and to bed" I would assume they went to bed together. And he didn't need to go into code to tell about it!!

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Todd, L&M note "*His Majesties declaration against the French* dated 9 February, but published on the 10th: Steele no 3455. The passage Pepys remarks on runs (pp.5-6) 'We do declare, That if any of the French or Low-Country Subjects, either out of affection to Us or our Government, or because of the oppression they meet with at home, shall come into Our Kingdomes, they shall be by Us protected in Their Persons and Estates, and especially those of the Reformed Religion....' Charles also gave assurances to French and Dutch subjects who already lived in Great Britain, provided that they did not correspond with the enemy."

I have been unable to find a version of the "declaration" online, surprisingly not even in British History Online: perhaps others can.

Mary   Link to this

"I did not hope to save my nail, whatever else ill....."

Sam must have been wielding that hammer with far more enthusiasm than concentration. Mrs. Turner's balsam is evidently a magic healing ointment.

Michael Robinson   Link to this

" ...the King’s Declaration of War against the French ..."

There appear to be two versions both with the imprint 'London : printed by John Bill and Christopher Barker, printers to the Kings most Excellent Majesty, 1666.' and dated the 9th. February.

There is a single sheet broadside, Steele I 3455; Wing (CD-ROM, 1996), C2952aA, Early English books, 1641-1700; 2802:10. Also a six page 2mo. pamphlet of a longer full text, Wing (2nd ed., 1994) C2952; Early English books, 1641-1700; 1121:6.

Both were reprinted by the King's Printer in Edinburgh, Evan Tyler; the broadside dated the 9th. (Steele, III, 2294) and the substantially longer, six page, text reprinted in four pages and dated the twenty first.

Images of all texts should be available in libraries with either the older microfilm set or web subscriptions to 'Early English Books On Line'
http://eebo.chadwyck.com/home

Todd Bernhardt   Link to this

Thanks, Terry. I suppose that without other "invitations" to compare to the one you cite, it'll be hard to determine whether by "mild" Sam means that Charles' "call to action" is weaker than usual in these instances, or that he's using particularly conciliatory language toward the subjects of his adversaries...

a. Hamilton   Link to this

the charms of domestic life

Sam as we would wish him.I had begun to worry, what with the recent press of business, that we were in for another outbreak of unbridled libido. He must be feeling less stressed and more secure in his position. I can imagine the scene on Pall Mall as the king and his brother take their constitutional with the courtiers hanging on every word, and there is Sam chatting with Jamie. Balm for his soul.

A.Hamilton   Link to this

Balsam for his soul, I should have said.

cgs   Link to this

Another insight into the mores of the times.

"...poor Pall would likely be distressed...."
Reduce overhead by settling unproductive expense onto another. Businesses still be paying off low productive workers.

Wot be one mans poison be another's glory.

The betters had choices of where to be entertained, 'me' suite or your suite or the sofa, whereas the lessors had fewer choices , our paliass or the dog house for the master.

The female required a wealthy father or had to take what be available to survive, without cash life be hard, exception be the one with good genetic looks.

Now for the independent modern ones, it be your pad or mine, no preachers blessing be needed as so many do not have to rely on scraps from the masters table as they have the ability to generate the cash for themselves. Freedom of choice.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Phil. Trans. 1665-1666 1, 385-388
Tryals Proposed by Mr. Boyle to Dr. Lower, be Made by Him, for the Improvement of Transfusing Blood out of One Live Animal into Another; Promised Numb. 20. p. 357

Monday, February 11, 1666.
http://rstl.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/...

Log in to post an annotation.

If you don't have an account, then register here.