Saturday 14 October 1665

Up, and to the office, where mighty busy, especially with Mr. Gawden, with whom I shall, I think, have much to do, and by and by comes the Lieutenant of the Tower by my invitation yesterday, but I had got nothing for him, it is to discourse about the Cole shipps. So he went away to Sheriffe Hooker’s, and I staid at the office till he sent for me at noon to dinner, I very hungry. When I come to the Sheriffe’s he was not there, nor in many other places, nor could find him at all, so was forced to come to the office and get a bit of meat from the taverne, and so to my business. By and by comes the Lieutenant and reproaches me with my not treating him as I ought, but all in jest, he it seemed dined with Mr. Adrian May. Very late writing letters at the office, and much satisfied to hear from Captain Cocke that he had got possession of some of his goods to his own house, and expected to have all to-night. The towne, I hear, is full of talke that there are great differences in the fleete among the great Commanders, and that Mings at Oxford did impeach my Lord of something, I think about these goods, but this is but talke. But my heart and head to-night is full of the Victualling business, being overjoyed and proud at my success in my proposal about it, it being read before the King, Duke, and the Caball with complete applause and satisfaction. This Sir G. Carteret and Sir W. Coventry both writ me, besides Sir W. Coventry’s letter to the Duke of Albemarle, which I read yesterday, and I hope to find my profit in it also. So late home to bed.

10 Annotations

JWB   Link to this

Stood-up @ lunch

Are we to take form this anecdote that Sam does not rank a head gardener, albeit a royal one?

Terry Foreman   Link to this

A11. JOHN EVELYN TO SAMUEL PEPYS (1)

For Samuel Pepys
Esqr etc at the Navy Office:
Greenewich:

Sayes Court

14 October 1665 (2)

Sir,

By what I have sent you, you will have a Specimen of the Method observed where I have any-thing to do (3). If the heads (4) be not particular enough, be pleas’d to give me your instructions where I may pertinently add: Take notice also, I pray, how few have miscarried [Most of those who dyed perished for want of covering] (5), the last winter consider’d, notwithstanding our agreement at a certainety with our Doctors and Chirurgeons for 3s[hillings] (6) per head; to avoyd the unconscionable bills of the Apothecaries, with one article alone would have been double all the expense, as by experience in the last Warr we learn’d: The Certificates answer to every individual person, which after you have perus’d, and are satisfied in, pray returne by this bearer; because they onely are my Vouchers; The other Accoumpt, keepe by you as long as you please, I having a duplicate; and call to us for the Whole when ever you please; because I long to give it in, and be discharg’d of so much of my Burthen: The two printed papers are an invention I have particularly practis’d in my owne Circle onely, which I hope you will not reprove, because it dos a little obviate the quærie of Sir William Coventry, to whom (if what I transmitt, prove satisfactory to you) speake your just thoughts of my Duty in the particulars he mentions and add to your former favours, that of including these Letters in your Packett for

Sir,

Your most obedient,
and faithfull Servant

JEvelyn:

Source: PRO S.P. 29/134, f.93. Endorsed by P, ‘14:8ber.65 Says Court. Esqr Evelin.’

2 MS: ‘Says-Court 14th:8br:-65’. See E’s letter of the same day to his father-in-law, Sir Richard Browne for a more graphic account (Appendix 1, no. 3).

3 E attached a copy of the printed form (see Appendix 1, no. 2).

4 I.e the headings.

5 Marginal note.

6 Abbreviation s is a probable reading, though l for £ is a possibility.

http://www.romanbritain.freeserve.co.uk/Pepysev...

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...he it seemed dined with Mr. Adrian May."

Sounds like one of the darker Clifton Webb characters from 40's film noir.

"Waldo Lydecker...Adrian May."

"May." icy stare.

"Lydecker." narrow sneer.

"Caught your new exhibit of Dutch masters...Rather wish I hadn't."

"My feelings exactly..."

With Sir John as the bumbling Nigel Bruce character...?

"Duh...Duh...Duh...Wonderful that London's two greatest art critics and patrons should have escaped this beastly plague, eh what?"

"Lydecker need have no fear of plague, Robinson. His tongue is far more deadly than any bulbo."

"I fear you are right, Robinson...Seems quite likely true men of genius like myself are to be cursed with 'great critics and patrons' like Povy and dear May here and their sort a bit longer."

And our boy as the compromised (well, come on, look at the last six months) investigating hero?

"So, Pepys. You've seen her self-portrait... Which I was first to appreciate." Lydecker, haughtily...

"You've heard the haunting theme song she wrote. Which I encouraged her to write." May, arrogantly.

"You're in love with Bess again, eh?" both in chorus...Eyeing each other...

"Well, May...Lydecker...Elisabeth is my wife."

"Beside the point..." May, sneering...

"Archaic notion...What is she? Your goods, your chattel?" Lydecker, frowning...

"Why a woman like that, I could mold into..." May, eagerly...

Sam a bit nonplussed...Robinson preferring to indulge in pipe...Bit of a strange pair, these two...

"You, you lump of sodden plaster?" Lydecker glaring... "To mar such perfection? I should lock you in with my neigbors...For whose sad fate, you may tell Bess, Pepys, that her faith in me as the kindest of men made me extremely sorry."

Yes...Sam nods brightly...

Hmmn...Perhaps I have been leaving Bess alone too much the last few months with these artistic types.

"Well, I shall tell Mrs. Pepys of your admiration of her work, gentlemen."

Both narrowly eye Sam as he leaves...

"You wrote Albemarle implicating him in this prize goods matter?" May, aside...

"He won't be leaving here so quickly on his next visit..." Lydecker nods.

"And then we can leave the matter to her choice..." May smiles...

My rifle, you mean...Lydecker, sneering...

And then we'll be together, Bess...As we always should have been...

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...he it seemed dined with Mr. Adrian May."

Sounds like one of the darker Clifton Webb characters from 40's film noir.

"Waldo Lydecker...Adrian May."

"May." icy stare.

"Lydecker." narrow sneer.

"Caught your new exhibit of Dutch masters...Rather wish I hadn't."

"My feelings exactly..."

With Sir John as the bumbling Nigel Bruce character...?

"Duh...Duh...Duh...Wonderful that London's two greatest art critics and patrons should have escaped this beastly plague, eh what?"

"Lydecker need have no fear of plague, Robinson. His tongue is far more deadly than any bulbo."

"I fear you are right, Robinson...Seems quite likely true men of genius like myself are to be cursed with 'great critics and patrons' like Povy and dear May here and their sort a bit longer."

And our boy as the compromised (well, come on, look at the last six months) investigating hero?

"So, Pepys. You've seen her self-portrait... Which I was first to appreciate." Lydecker, haughtily...

"You've heard the haunting theme song she wrote. Which I encouraged her to write." May, arrogantly.

"You're in love with Bess again, eh?" both in chorus...Eyeing each other...

"Well, May...Lydecker...Elisabeth is my wife."

"Beside the point..." May, sneering...

"Archaic notion...What is she? Your goods, your chattel?" Lydecker, frowning...

"Why a woman like that, I could mold into..." May, eagerly...

Sam a bit nonplussed...Robinson preferring to indulge in pipe...Bit of a strange pair, these two...

"You, you lump of sodden plaster?" Lydecker glaring... "To mar such perfection? I should lock you in with my neigbors...For whose sad fate, you may tell Bess, Pepys, that her faith in me as the kindest of men made me extremely sorry."

Yes...Sam nods brightly...

Hmmn...Perhaps I have been leaving Bess alone too much the last few months with these artistic types.

"Well, I shall tell Mrs. Pepys of your admiration of her work, gentlemen."

Both narrowly eye Sam as he leaves...

"You wrote Albemarle implicating him in this prize goods matter?" May, aside...

"He won't be leaving here so quickly on his next visit..." Lydecker nods.

"And then we can leave the matter to her choice..." May smiles...

My rifle, you mean...Lydecker, sneering...

And then we'll be together, Bess...As we always should have been...

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Meaning of course that Bess' portrait is actually hidden inside Waldo's clock, waiting to be found again...

dirk   Link to this

From the Carte Papers, Bodleian Library
http://www.bodley.ox.ac.uk/dept/scwmss/projects...

George, Duke of Albemarle, to Sandwich

Written from: Cock-pitt
Date: 14 October 1665

Communicates the measures taken with respect to the care and disposal of the Prize-goods. "There are great quantities seized, and we know not how to distinguish the Flag-Officers' goods from others. If you could find out a way to do that, & let it be expressed in your order, I think it would do your business". Adds that the Dutch fleet has left the coast.

Michael Robinson   Link to this

" ... my heart and head to-night is full of the Victualling business, being overjoyed and proud at my success in my proposal about it, it being read before the King, Duke, and the Caball with complete applause and satisfaction. ..."

The reception of SP's letter of the 6th.:-

"I to my office, where very busy drawing up a letter by way of discourse to the Duke of Albemarle about my conception how the business of the Victualling should be ordered, wherein I have taken great pains, and I think have hitt the right if they will but follow it"
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1665/10/06/

L&M Note " This letter was the result of an inquiry into naval victualing which had been going on since the end of August, occasioned by the failure of supplies in the course of the campaigns of this year . ... A decision had to be made quickly because the Board had to acquaint Gauden by Michaelmas of its victualling needs for the next year. Pepys now suggested a re-organization, although ... he knew little in detail about the business. He decided despite Coventry's contrary opinion, that the addition of partners to Gauden (in sole charge since September 1660) would cause immediate delays without solving any root problems. He objected on similar grounds to a scheme of state management. He recommended in effect a combination of the traditional system of private contracting with the Commonwealth method of state management. The government was to appoint and pay a Surveyor-General who, by means of weekly reports from surveyors at each port, would keep a check on the supplies provided by the contractors.

*Spoiler* on 19th. October Pepys wrote to Coventry proposing himself for the post, and was on 4 December appointed at a salary of GBP 300 p.a., to which Gauden later added GBP 500 p.a. It is clear that as long as the system lasted - i.e. during the war, for the office was abolished in the summer of 1667 - a certain improvement resulted. ..."

Don McCahill   Link to this

Interesting note, Michael.

I do wonder about the fact that the commissioner gets more money from the person he is overseeing than from the crown. But that seems to be the way things worked back then.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"the unconscionable bills of the Apothecaries"

So Evelyn complains to Pepys. Has this changed?

A. De Araujo   Link to this

"the unconscionable bills of the apothecaries"
Has not changed at all at least in the USA;many families have to declare bankruptcy due to medical costs and the greed of the pharmaceutical industry.

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