Wednesday 27 September 1665

Up, and saw and admired my wife’s picture of our Saviour,1 now finished, which is very pretty. So by water to Greenwich, where with Creed and Lord Rutherford, and there my Lord told me that he would give me 100l. for my pains, which pleased me well, though Creed, like a cunning rogue, hath got a promise of half of it from me. We to the King’s Head, the great musique house, the first time I was ever there, and had a good breakfast, and thence parted, I being much troubled to hear from Creed, that he was told at Salsbury that I am come to be a great swearer and drinker, though I know the contrary; but, Lord! to see how my late little drinking of wine is taken notice of by envious men to my disadvantage. I thence to Captain Cocke’s, [and] (he not yet come from town) to Mr. Evelyn’s, where much company; and thence in his coach with him to the Duke of Albemarle by Lambeth, who was in a mighty pleasant humour; there the Duke tells us that the Dutch do stay abroad, and our fleet must go out again, or to be ready to do so. Here we got several things ordered as we desired for the relief of the prisoners, and sick and wounded men. Here I saw this week’s Bill of Mortality, wherein, blessed be God! there is above 1800 decrease, being the first considerable decrease we have had. Back again the same way and had most excellent discourse of Mr. Evelyn touching all manner of learning; wherein I find him a very fine gentleman, and particularly of paynting, in which he tells me the beautifull Mrs. Middleton is rare, and his own wife do brave things. He brought me to the office, whither comes unexpectedly Captain Cocke, who hath brought one parcel of our goods by waggons, and at first resolved to have lodged them at our office; but then the thoughts of its being the King’s house altered our resolution, and so put them at his friend’s, Mr. Glanvill’s, and there they are safe. Would the rest of them were so too! In discourse, we come to mention my profit, and he offers me 500l. clear, and I demand 600l. for my certain profit. We part to-night, and I lie there at Mr. Glanvill’s house, there being none there but a maydeservant and a young man; being in some pain, partly from not knowing what to do in this business, having a mind to be at a certainty in my profit, and partly through his having Jacke sicke still, and his blackemore now also fallen sicke. So he being gone, I to bed.

  1. This picture by Mrs. Pepys may have given trouble when Pepys was unjustifiably attacked for having Popish pictures in his house.

13 Annotations

Michael Robinson   Link to this

the beautifull Mrs. Middleton

Her portrait, c. 1663-5, by Lely:
http://www.royalcollection.org.uk/egallery/obje...

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"This picture by Mrs. Pepys may have given trouble when Pepys was unjustifiably attacked for having Popish pictures in his house."

Perhaps not as much trouble as the one she will be painting of the "Virgin's head" on 9 August 1666, with which SP reports he is "mightily pleased" -- purely aesthetically, of course! http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1666/08/09/

CGS   Link to this

Kings Head ; what it be named back in '59?? the levell headed one?

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"being in some pain,...partly through his having Jacke sicke still, and his blackemore now also fallen sicke."

I am unsure whom SP intends by [a] "Jacke" but a "blackemore" is a "black" person (also "negro") of either gender. http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/blackamoor

Mary   Link to this

Jack sounds like Glanvill's boy or perhaps (Glanville was a lawyer) his clerk? Some kind of live-in employee, at any rate. If Jack were a relative (son, nephew etc.) I should expect Pepys to indicate the relationship.

JWB   Link to this

Jacke was Capt. Cocke's boy.

JWB   Link to this

Salty Head

There was a King's Head tavern in Depford issuing tokens in lieu coin of the realm in 1649, the year Chas. 1st lost his head. Like "Saracen's Head", I don't think it's honorific.

JWB   Link to this

"...unjustifiably attacked for having Popish pictures ..."

Unjustifiable? I don't know any Protestants with graven images of Jesus or Mary on their walls, what w/ history of argument over meaning 2nd Commandment 'n all.

A. De Araujo   Link to this

"I don't know any Protestants....."
I am sure there are many Protestants with paintings of the original Madonna in their collection.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"Isn't it wonderful, Hewer?" Pepys beams at the new painting.

"Ummn...Well..." Hewer tries...Eyeing the oddly costumed bug-eyed figure. "Tis a very good likeness of you, sir."

"Hewer, as you plainly can see that is Bess' impression of our Savior." Sam frowns.

Ummn...

"There's no need to flatter me." Sam regards the portrait.

On the other hand...A happy smile. Only to be expected He might bear some resemblance...

"Still, if that's your honest opinion..."

"Oh, indeed, sir."

"Have a look at these sketches Mrs. Pepys has done for a portrait of the Virgin."

Oh, my dear God...Hewer chokes, staring at Sam in shawl, babe fondly held on lap. Baby Samuel...er Jesus bearing same features as mother.

"A remarkable talent, eh?"

"Oh dear God...I mean, yes, remarkable."

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...he was told at Salsbury that I am come to be a great swearer and drinker, though I know the contrary..."

Sounds like Capt Cocke has been calling himself Samuel Pepys in Salsbury.

Now if Creed had heard "notorious adulterer, abuser of powerless employees and their wives, smooth bribe-taker, shady deal-broker, two-faced hypocrite, etc..."

"I didn't pimp Bess to Uncle Wight...Yet..."

Ok, limit "etc"...

I notice he was more concerned about denying the drinking than the swearing... "...my late little drinking of wine..."

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"he was told at Salsbury that I am come to be a great swearer and drinker"

Salisbury is where the court-on-the-run-from-the-plague has been of late.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"to Mr. Evelyn’s...and thence in his coach with him to the Duke of Albemarle by Lambeth, [where] we got several things ordered as we desired for the relief of the prisoners, and sick and wounded men."

If memory serves, this is the first joint venture by the diarists Pepys and Evelyn.

Log in to post an annotation.

If you don't have an account, then register here.