Tuesday 27 December 1664

My people came to bed, after their sporting, at four o’clock in the morning; I up at seven, and to Deptford and Woolwich in a gally; the Duke calling to me out of the barge in which the King was with him going down the river, to know whither I was going. I told him to Woolwich, but was troubled afterward I should say no farther, being in a gally, lest he think me too profuse in my journeys. Did several businesses, and then back again by two o’clock to Sir J. Minnes’s to dinner by appointment, where all yesterday’s company but Mr. Coventry, who could not come. Here merry, and after an hour’s chat I down to the office, where busy late, and then home to supper and to bed. The Comet appeared again to-night, but duskishly. I went to bed, leaving my wife and all her folks, and Will also, too, come to make Christmas gambolls to-night.

18 Annotations

language hat   Link to this

"but was troubled afterward I should say no farther"

Can anyone interpret this?

Also, I love "duskishly" (first OED cite: 1589 FLEMING Virg. Georg. IV. 65 Purple hew.. dooth somwhat duskishly shine in the leaues).

cape henry   Link to this

"...no farther." I took this to mean that by taking a "gally" only as far as Woolwich, he was using a conveyance a bit grand [profuse] for the short length of the trip or mundane aspect of the destination. Is it not ever the goal of the middle manager to find the correct mean of lifestyle? Here he is seen in a towncar when he should have been in a jitney, perhaps. Embarrassing with the CEO observing.

cgs   Link to this

Samuell being found out that he was using the Gally for extended trips be a little embarrassing, like taking the company jet for a trip to Oxford or Cambridge,when he should have used his own car [ or the puffer, 1st class of course] here he should have used the services of the skull [with a see of course] or the the daily hoy.

andy   Link to this

My people came to bed, after their sporting, at four o’clock in the morning; I up at seven

know the feeling Sam,I have two sudent offspring back on holidays and I get the 07:18...

jeannine   Link to this

gambolls? any idea what they are?

cape henry   Link to this

Normally, I think of children - or dogs - gamboling about in the yard. But in this instance, I think Pepys means very active sort of merrymaking indoors. Blindmans' buff would qualify. It's easy to imagine any holiday party, when there are young people present, where general, ecstatic gamboling might erupt. I might be tempted to gambol now and again even at my age around certain grandchildren.

Bradford   Link to this

Note the low profile kept, for several psychological reasons.

language hat   Link to this

Thanks, cape henry and cgs!

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"her folks"

Apparently her servants, since Will is included and no de St. Michel is named. The site search yields only 3 uses of "folks" in the Diary so far, to mean (a) people generally (13 May 1664); (b) people of a certain work-group (13 September 1662 and here, I presume).

But there seems to have been no Diary reference to "folks" as parents and/or other blood-relations. Was this uncommon yet? When did it begin?

cgs   Link to this

the OED concurs: not 'til 1715 then 1854 did it include family;
prior it : it was them that does the work.

1 country-folk *
2 womenfolk *
3 workfolk= WORKPEOPLE, esp. farm labourers.
c1475 Pol. Poems (Rolls) II. 285 That syche wyrfolk be payd in good moné.

1566 Engl. Ch. Furniture
Folk-
2. a. An aggregation of people in relation to a superior, e.g. God, a king or priest; the great mass as opposed to an individual; the people; the vulgar. Obs. exc. arch.

b. (also pl.) Retainers, followers; servants, workpeople. Obs.
c1205

4. a. pl. (exc. dial.) The people of one's family, parents, children, relatives. 1715 Pattern ...
b. dial. Friends, intimates. 1854 ...

cape henry   Link to this

Just musing here in response to TF's question, but I imagine Pepys would have noted it if his in-laws had shown up for the festivities, if for no other reason than because of Elizabeth's embarrassing, and for him incriminating, injury.

Pedro   Link to this

On behalf of Terry on behalf of Dirk.

William Coventry to Sandwich

Written from: [Whitehall]
Date: 27 December 1664

Shelfmark: MS. Carte 75, fol(s). 291-292

Document type: Holograph

Communicates reports from the Victualler, & from the Commissioners of Ordnance, as to supplies of provisions and ammunition to Portsmouth. States that at Amsterdam fifty per cent insurance on wine-ships, and thirty per cent on Smyrna ships, have been offered; - "which is the greatest ground of hopes I have that either here, or about the Straits, we may have a good account of it". ... "The Guinea frigate is returned from New England, & brings news that Nicols hath taken all that remained to the Dutch about Delaware Bay, where he took a fort by storm".

Jesse   Link to this

"make Christmas gambolls to-night"

Johnson has gambol(n) as 'a skip; a hop; a leap for joy.' The (v) being 'to dance; to skip' &c.

Sort of fits.

cgs   Link to this

the q. of Gambol vs gamble got me failing marks when I be eleven and I went on to be a cabin boy, and the Kings shilling.
Between the lambs that be the betters mark and playtime on the green, I dothe thinke that Samuell has lost his shirt, Eliza be cockin' a snoot.

cgs   Link to this

gambol, n. [a. F. gambade leap or spring. ad. It. gambata f. gamba leg (F. jambe).
The word appears first at the beginning of the 16th c. The ending -ade seems almost from the first to have been confused with the then more common -aud, -auld. Subsequently the d was dropped in gambald; cf. curtal from earlier curtald.]

gambol, n. [a. F. gambade leap or spring. ad. It. gambata f. gamba leg (F. jambe).
The word appears first at the beginning of the 16th c. The ending -ade seems almost from the first to have been confused with the then more common -aud, -auld. Subsequently the d was dropped in gambald; cf. curtal from earlier curtald.]

1. The bound or curvet of a horse. Obs. rare. (Cf. GAMBADE.) 1503
2. A leap or spring in dancing or sporting, a caper, frisk. Now chiefly pl., of the sportive movements of children and animals.
1513
. transf. and fig. in pl. Frolicsome movements or proceedings. Rarely sing., a frolic, merrymaking.

1596 SHAKES. Merch. V. III. i. 93 Those crisped snakie golden locks Which makes such wanton gambols with the winde.
. transf. and fig. in pl. Frolicsome movements or proceedings. Rarely sing., a frolic, merrymaking.

1596 SHAKES. Merch. V. III. i. 93 Those crisped snakie golden locks Which makes such wanton gambols with the winde.

4. attrib. (quasi-adj.) Sportive, playful. Obs.
1597 SHAKES. 2 Hen. IV, II. iv. 273 Such other Gamboll faculties hee hath, that shew a weake minde, and an able Body.

1622 MABBE tr. Aleman's Guzman d'Alf. I. 132 Other were full of their gamboll-tricks, each man having his severall Posture.

1664 H. MORE Myst. Iniq. 447 It look'd alwaies to me so like a gambal trick, that I could not but place it among the earlier Legends or pious Fictions of the Church.

jeannine   Link to this

Thanks all for the explanation of gambolls-sounds like Elizabeth is at least having some fun with the servants.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Yes, that shiner must be quite a statement to the 'family' in its blue-black glory.

Pedro   Link to this

On the 27th December/6th January…

(De Ruyter has reached Cape Three Points on the Gold Coast and was told that it would be easy to capture the English settlement at Tacorary.)

A longboat was sent to the fort to demand its surrender, but the men on shore shouted, “Come back early tomorrow morning.” When the boat returned with white flags it was greeted with heavy musket shot by Negroes who were hidden along the coast, whereupon 440 men landed under cover of artillery of five shallops, which came close in to land. The fort offered little resistance and soon hoisted the white flag…The Negroes attacked it soon afterwards but were repulsed with great losses. Presently a thousand Negroes arrived from Elmina in canoes. They had been sent by the Dutch Governor and were welcomed by De Ruyter. They immediately proceeded to plunder the Tacorary Negro village. As the fortress did not promise to be of much use due to the hostile attitude of the population, it was blown up on the 6th January and an English ship, the Victory, lying off shore, was captured.

(Life of Admiral De Ruyter by Blok)

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