Sunday 10 January 1663/64

(Lord’s day). Lay in bed with my wife till 10 or 11 o’clock, having been very sleepy all night. So up, and my brother Tom being come to see me, we to dinner, he telling me how Mrs. Turner found herself discontented with her late bad journey, and not well taken by them in the country, they not desiring her coming down, nor the burials of Mr. Edward Pepys’s corps there. After dinner I to the office, where all the afternoon, and at night my wife and I to my uncle Wight’s, and there eat some of their swan pie, which was good, and I invited them to my house to eat a roasted swan on Tuesday next, which after I was come home did make a quarrels between my wife and I, because she had appointed a wish to-morrow. But, however, we were friends again quickly. So to bed. All our discourse to-night was Mr. Tryan’s late being robbed; and that Collonell Turner (a mad, swearing, confident fellow, well known by all, and by me), one much indebted to this man for his very livelihood, was the man that either did or plotted it; and the money and things are found in his hand, and he and his wife now in Newgate for it; of which we are all glad, so very a known rogue he was.

14 Annotations

Bradford   Link to this

"I invited them to my house to eat a roasted swan on Tuesday next, which after I was come home did make a quarrels between my wife and I, because she had appointed a ^wish^ to-morrow."

Impulse to emend to "dish." Is "wish" correct? If so, please translate.

A. De Araujo   Link to this

"eat some of their swan pie.....to my house to eat a roasted swan"
I guess swan has not been in the menu these days,if so I wish they would switch to Canada geese.

Glyn   Link to this

Tomorrow is Monday, so on past experience I think it's "wash" not "wish" - the vowels might look similar. The regular Monday washday always takes a lot of effort from all of the women in the household and leaves the place in a mess, and now Elizabeth is expected to arrange obtaining and roasting a swan as well in their state-of-the-art oven (and she's not a particularly experienced cook, as I recall). Anyway, this falls in her household responsibilities, so she should have been consulted first.

Can't you just imagine her biting her tongue and smiling through clenched teeth as her husband blithely invites people around, and then giving him a tongue-lashing when they're alone.

jeannine   Link to this

"Collonell Turner (a mad, swearing, confident fellow"
A wonderful description of a person -you can just imagine what he's like through Sam's word.

Andrew Hamilton   Link to this

Lay in bed with my wife till 10 or 11 o'clock....Invited them to my house to eat a roasted swan on Tuesday next, which after I was come home did make a quarrels between my wife and I....But, however, we were friends again quickly. So to bed.

Am I wrong to sense connections between all this bed-time with Beth ( which seems very cosy), Sam's urges to roam, set down yesterday, and Beth's prior prolonged period of feeling ill?
Is this a case of all's well that ends well?

Don McCahill   Link to this

a confident fellow

Today this would be a compliment, but I don't assume Sam thought it was. Would this be the meaning of confident that led to the term 'con man'?

language hat   Link to this

confident:

This would be the OED's definition 4. (In bad sense:) Over-bold, unduly self-reliant; forward, presumptuous, impudent.

JonTom Kittredge   Link to this

No Church?
Granted, SP could excuse himself from the morning service on grounds of being indisposed (not getting enough sleep the night before). But he was well enough to spend all afternoon at the office. This is the first time I remember him missing both services without the excuse of sickness or pressing business for the Kings service.

djc   Link to this

L+M has 'wash' also a note "preceeding part of entry crowded into bottom of page"

Sean Adams   Link to this

Col. Turner
Brisk work - 17th century justice. Crime committed on 7th of January, Col. Turner in prison by 9th, tried and executed on 21st.

Brian   Link to this

"to my uncle Wight's, and there eat some of their swan pie."
This couldn't be the same pie that they failed to eat on New Years's Day, could it? Yuck!

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Hey, Uncle Wight didn't become a wealthy fishmonger by cooking a fresh swan every time guests come over...

Robert Gertz   Link to this

At this rate, swan might well replace venison pasty.

Kevin Peter   Link to this

It's interesting to see the contrast between Sam's description of Colonel Turner and the description in the Newgate Calendar page linked to a couple days ago by Clement and Paul Chapin.

http://www.exclassics.com/newgate/ng23.htm

The page describes Colonel Turner as a well-respected merchant who was an unlikely criminal, whereas Sam describes him as an arrogant rogue who deserved what was coming to him. It's apparent from this that although Colonel Turner may have been respected by many, at least some people (including Sam) didn't respect him in the least.

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