Friday 12 June 1663

Up and my office, there conning my measuring Ruler, which I shall grow a master of in a very little time. At noon to the Exchange and so home to dinner, and abroad with my wife by water to the Royall Theatre; and there saw “The Committee,” a merry but indifferent play, only Lacey’s part, an Irish footman, is beyond imagination. Here I saw my Lord Falconbridge, and his Lady, my Lady Mary Cromwell, who looks as well as I have known her, and well clad; but when the House began to fill she put on her vizard, and so kept it on all the play; which of late is become a great fashion among the ladies, which hides their whole face. So to the Exchange, to buy things with my wife; among others, a vizard for herself. And so by water home and to my office to do a little business, and so to see Sir W. Pen, but being going to bed and not well I could not see him. So home and to supper and bed, being mightily troubled all night and next morning with the palate of my mouth being down from some cold I took to-day sitting sweating in the playhouse, and the wind blowing through the windows upon my head.

19 Annotations

Phil Gyford   Link to this

Sorry for the mix-up - I posted 13 June's entry as 12 June. The annotations relevant to the entry will still be there tomorrow, but I'll remove those related to the mix-up to avoid confusion.

Miss Ann   Link to this

Our boy sure does like to keep up with the current fashions! I wonder if "vizards" will make a return - Vivienne Westwood would be the most likely fashionista I suppose.

jeannine   Link to this

Miss Ann
You are too kind-I was thinking he only bought it because it would HIDE her BEAUTIFUL face from other men! Sam may like the latest trends (usually for himself when parting with money is concerned) so although this seems like a nice present for Elizabeth, there's something in it for Sam too.

Tom Burns   Link to this

"... being mightily troubled all night and next morning with the palate of my mouth being down from some cold I took to-day sitting sweating in the playhouse, and the wind blowing through the windows upon my head."

Ah ha! See what happens to oathbreakers! And it will be much harder to keep that oath in the future, for where else but the playhouse will she wear her new vizard! (Hmmm. I could speculate on that last, but I will defer to our readers' sensibilities...)

Stolzi   Link to this

"the palate of my mouth being down..."

Certainly a novel diagnosis. Perhaps it refers to that stuffy feeling in the back of the throat which one gets from the cold and the grippe and the postnasal drip, yeccch.

Yes, I was wondering about the oath, too. Perhaps Samuel saw that it was time to do =something= to make Bess happy before banishing her to the country. Where she'll hardly have any opportunity to wear the vizard.

jeannine   Link to this

"Vizard masks
This refers to the Restoration fashion of wearing a face mask which covered the entire face, the vizard mask soon became associated with prostitution and a 'vizard mask' became a synonym for a 'Daughter of Venus'(prostitute). The vizard-masks were in abundance at the playhouses and plied their trade at each level of the auditorium. Originally they were worn by ladies not wishing to risk an insult to their modesty when attending a new comedy, indeed they become very popular in the reign of Charles II. Pepys talks of going to buy his wife a vizard. Later the wearing of full facial masks was abolished, because of the connection with prostitutes. The comic potential of such confusion is at once apparent and was used by numerous playwrights. William Wycherley uses masks to great effect in his famous play The Country Wife:

Pinchwife: Pshaw, a mask makes people but more inquisitive, and is ridiculous a disguise as a stage-beard...
No, I'll not use her to a mask, 'tis dangerous; for masks have made more cuckolds
than the best faces that ever were known.11
(Act iii, scene i.)"

From the interesting website
http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/~www_se/murray/Rest...

Roger Arbor   Link to this

Do burkas have the same effect I wonder?

see: http://www.beliefnet.com/story/143/story_14334_...

John M   Link to this

I wonder how difficult it was to be the daughter of the Lord Protector in Restoration London.

Was Cromwell's head still on public display at this time? Mary Cromwell would have been on the receiving end of a lot of curious glances (at the very least). Maybe this is why "when the house began to fill up she put on her Vizard".

in Aqua scripto   Link to this

vizard; to hide behind or from, a protection from a misglance or to keep thy inner thoughts from being too obvious, today we use the smile to keep a poker face. Sam wants a Visard to prevent king of flat feet from knowing Eliza's response to the glance over the common prayer book, also better start covering Elizabeth's famous golden locks, other wise the visage be known.

A. De Araujo   Link to this

"being down from some cold I took to-day sitting sweating in the playhouse,and the wind blowing through the windows upon my head"
Hot-Cold, Ying-Yang theory of disease; my mother still believes in it, no matter how I try to explain that virus cause cold.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

“being down from some cold I took to-day sitting sweating in the playhouse,and the wind blowing through the windows upon my head”

But Sam is potentially correct to the extent that lowering immune resistance via cold will offer a clearer path for the bugs awaiting their chance.

in Aqua scripto   Link to this

Which bugs? those in well or those in the Gods?

TerryF   Link to this

IF SP had a "cold," what was he doing 2-3 days ago?

He could have been circulating socially/ putting his immune system at risk at that time (iIt takes a little time for the bugs/germs to gestate) -- We know he is always out and about; but might his immune system also have been just a little stressed by his final (non-)confrontation with Pembleton, or the confrontation of Ashwell, et al., in the wine cellar?

A. Hamilton   Link to this

Pshaw, a mask makes people but more inquisitive, and is ridiculous a disguise as a stage-beard…
No, I’ll not use her to a mask, ‘tis dangerous; for masks have made more cuckolds
than the best faces that ever were known

Jeannine, a most appropriate quote & makes me wonder about Sam buying a vizard for his wife (or her wanting one) since the mystery come-on is so obvious. As to burkas, I guess it depends on the imagination. Vizards on showily dressed women display the goods with a beeak-a-boo wink. Burkas cover all.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Bugs? Generally bacteria, but it can stand for viruses as well.

***

The vizard, tis the fashion.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"So how does the Master and Commander of all things metrical be doing?" Batten hisses to Minnes as they watch Pepys happily hard at his new ultra Ruler.

"Metrical...?" Minnes stares.

Had no idea little Pepys was poetical.

***

Pauline   Link to this

'Elizabeth’s famous golden locks'
This has taken me by surprise, in Aqua. Is Elizabeth a blonde?

in Aqua scripto   Link to this

Sam never calls her black? the name for a brunette, and at this time angles/normans coloring dominated the scene.
So an ill conceived assumtion [not proven or non liquet] Her paintings be of a dark hue.

Wim van der Meij   Link to this

It may well be that in these days the ladies' (sometimes quite big) sunglasses serve the same purpose as the masks of Sam's time.

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