Thursday 11 June 1663

Up and spent most of the morning upon my measuring Ruler and with great pleasure I have found out some things myself of great dispatch, more than my book teaches me, which pleases me mightily. Sent my wife’s things and the wine to-day by the carrier to my father’s, but staid my boy from a letter of my father’s, wherein he desires that he may not come to trouble his family as he did the last year. Dined at home and then to the office, where we sat all the afternoon, and at night home and spent the evening with my wife, and she and I did jangle mightily about her cushions that she wrought with worsteds the last year, which are too little for any use, but were good friends by and by again. But one thing I must confess I do observe, which I did not before, which is, that I cannot blame my wife to be now in a worse humour than she used to be, for I am taken up in my talk with Ashwell, who is a very witty girl, that I am not so fond of her as I used and ought to be, which now I do perceive I will remedy, but I would to the Lord I had never taken any, though I cannot have a better than her. To supper and to bed. The consideration that this is the longest day in the year is very unpleasant to me. —[It is necessary to note that this was according to the old style.]— This afternoon my wife had a visit from my Lady Jeminah and Mr. Ferrers.

18 Annotations

Leo Starrenburg   Link to this

"The consideration that this is the longest day in the year is very unpleasant to me."

Why? Because daylight will be shorter from now on? And his thoughts on Ashwell are lost on me as well, that is I think he's not really beeing honest with himself on this matter.

m vr groet, Leo.

John M   Link to this

"Up and spent most of the morning upon my measuring Ruler and with great pleasure I have found out some things myself of great dispatch, more than my book teaches me, which pleases me mightily" Clever old Sam; he's found a software feature that isn't in the manual

Bradford   Link to this

I think, Leo, that Pepys enjoys bantering with Ashwell, who proves a witty opponent, whereas his exchanges with Elizabeth seem likely of late to degenerate into wrangles and jangles, no matter how swiftly they are reconciled. (Those who quarrel over fanciwork throw pillows are only hunting for a pretext.)

Rather than ascribe too much significance to such mutual playfulness, which has been purely verbal up to this point, let's keep in mind the apt definition by Max O'Rell (1848-1903): "Flirtation, attention without intention."

dirk   Link to this

"this is the longest day in the year"

This has been explained before, but just in case there is still some confusion: 11 June according to the British (uncorrected) calendar is equivalent to 21 June on the continent, where they were already using the corrected, Gregorian calendar. The only reason the British had so far refused to make the correction, was that they found it impossible to accept a calendar correction that had been decreed by the Pope in Rome -- but everybody with some learning (including Sam) was aware of the error.
[See also the background info.]

TerryF   Link to this

Wayneman is grounded!

"staid my boy [due to] a letter of my father’s, wherein he desires that [my boy] not come to trouble his family as he did the last year."

Stolzi   Link to this

Wayneman
is a pain, man.

Todd Bernhardt   Link to this

Is Ashwell going into the country with Elizabeth?

jeannine   Link to this

"Wayneman is a pain, man."

Stolzi, I know, but I have a soft spot for him...he makes such good reading! How boring if Sam had a well behaved servant as we'd never hear him mentioned.

Todd, yes I believe Ashwell is going with Elizabeth. With the "shift in the wind" these days it may make for an interesting trip. I think that they may be getting on each other's nerves (or at least Ashwell seems to be on Elizabeth's). Also, interesting is the change in Sam's thoughts about Ashwell. Actually living with someone is so different than just having them visit.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"I cannot blame my wife to be now in a worse humour than she used to be, for I am taken up in my talk with Ashwell, who is a very witty girl, that I am not so fond of her as I used and ought to be, which now I do perceive I will remedy..."

Gotta be a good husband... Homer Simpson.
***

"...but I would to the Lord I had never taken any, though I cannot have a better than her."

So is Sam regretting taking on a lady's companion (Ashwell)...Or a wife?

in Aqua scripto   Link to this

Oh 'wot ' an under statement
"Actually living with someone is so different than just having them visit"

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Hard to "remedy" paying too little attention to Bess if she's off to Brampton shortly, Sam. Unless you plan to do another salmon dinner or cough up some decent dress money.

***
“…but I would to the Lord I had never taken any, though I cannot have a better than her.”

Yes, I know the feeling...(whack, whack. "But honey, you yourself said the other day that some days when I'm really a pain...")

I'm sure if faced with the offer Sam would retract and properly grovel to keep his Bess...He already did, after all, pre-Diary.

***

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"Mrs. Pepys seemed happy to be off to Brampton, sir."

"Aye, Will. Lets hope she and Ashwell left to themselves can last out the time without killing my father."

"Well, she was singing a merry tune when I left them on the coach."

Bess eyes the sleeping Ashwell across the coach...

"Little bird, jaunty little bird...Gonna ring your neck and throw you down the well. Throw you down the well, Sam's pet. Throw you down the well, Sam's pet. Break your neck, my Sammy's pet. Break your neck, oh you bet. Little bird, gonna throw you down Father Pepys' well."

in Aqua scripto   Link to this

Spelling difference :girl L&M 'witty girle'; staid- L&M'stayed'
"have a better than her" L&M 'then'
visit L&M 'visitt'
Just comparing and it shows that tho minor but can create semantic upsets for the purist:there be differing ways that the manuscript be read.

Benvenuto   Link to this

"she and I did jangle mightily about her cushions"
Nothing like a bit of jangling about the cushions to put a smile on the marital face!

A. De Araujo   Link to this

"and she and I did jangle mightilly"
I wonder if Jangle has anything to do with Yack or Jive; I mean are the latter derived from the former.

Sjoerd   Link to this

"jangle mightily about her cushions"

Beginners' mistake there, in my opinion, starting a discussion with the wife about the practical use of cushions. Wasn't there an epsiode of the BBC series "Coupling" about that ?

Australian Susan   Link to this

For those who don't know - homepage for Coupling.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/comedy/coupling/
Although I can imagine it, I couldn't actually find a Cushions Episode.......

Patricia   Link to this

Sam is a pain! He has to correct everyone's work. We've seen this over & over--the portraitist, the workmen, the musician, and now he's finding fault with Mrs. P's cushions.
Make your own damn cushions next time, Sam!

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