Friday 29 May 1663

This day is kept strictly as a holy-day, being the King’s Coronation. We lay long in bed, and it rained very hard, rain and hail, almost all the morning. By and by Creed and I abroad, and called at several churches; and it is a wonder to see, and by that to guess the ill temper of the City at this time, either to religion in general, or to the King, that in some churches there was hardly ten people in the whole church, and those poor people. So to a coffee-house, and there in discourse hear the King of France is likely to be well again. So home to dinner, and out by water to the Royall Theatre, but they not acting to-day, then to the Duke’s house, and there saw “The Slighted Mayde,” wherein Gosnell acted Pyramena, a great part, and did it very well, and I believe will do it better and better, and prove a good actor. The play is not very excellent, but is well acted, and in general the actors, in all particulars, are better than at the other house. Thence to the Cocke alehouse, and there having drunk, sent them with Creed to see the German Princess, at the Gatehouse, at Westminster, and I to my brother’s, and thence to my uncle Fenner’s to have seen my aunt James (who has been long in town and goes away to-morrow and I not seen her), but did find none of them within, which I was glad of, and so back to my brother’s to speak with him, and so home, and in my way did take two turns forwards and backwards through the Fleete Ally to see a couple of pretty [strumpets] that stood off the doors there, and God forgive me I could scarce stay myself from going into their houses with them, so apt is my nature to evil after once, as I have these two days, set upon pleasure again. So home and to my office to put down these two days’ journalls, then home again and to supper, and then Creed and I to bed with good discourse, only my mind troubled about my spending my time so badly for these seven or eight days; but I must impute it to the disquiet that my mind has been in of late about my wife, and for my going these two days to plays, for which I have paid the due forfeit by money and abating the times of going to plays at Court, which I am now to remember that I have cleared all my times that I am to go to Court plays to the end of this month, and so June is the first time that I am to begin to reckon.

17 Annotations

dirk   Link to this

John Evelyn's diary today:

"Dr. Creighton preached his extravagant Sermon at St. Margarits before the house of Commons: 3. Cant: ult: [see note] I dined at Mr. Treasurers his Majesties joyfull Anniversarie & Restauration:"

[note]: Cant. 3:11 -- Song of Solomon -- "Go forth, O ye daughters of Zion, and behold king Solomon with the crown wherewith his mother crowned him in the day of his espousals, and in the day of the gladness of his heart."

Australian Susan   Link to this

Service as published in the Book of Common Prayer, 1662
"A FORM OF PRAYER with THANKSGIVING to Almighty God, for having put an end to the Great Rebellion, by the Restitution of the King and Royal Family, and the Restoration of the Government after many years interruption: which unspeakable mercies were wonderfully completed upon the Twenty-ninth of May, in the year 1660; and in memory therof, that day in every year is by Act of Parliament appointed to be for ever kept holy."

The service consisted of Morning Prayer with additional prayers. The readings were 2 Samuel 19 verse 9
and The Epistle of St Jude.

TerryF   Link to this

"a couple of pretty whores that stood off the doors there"

So L&M.

Today is consumed with *seing* and the sins of the eyes, of which Samuel is aware, and about which Matt. 5:29 says: "And if thy right eye offend thee, pluck it out, and cast [it] from thee: for it is profitable for thee that one of thy members should perish, and not [that] thy whole body should be cast into hell."

TerryF   Link to this

The L&M Companion has Winifred Gosnell as the actress.
http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/5618/
rather than her sister "Ms. Gosnell", who is linked here.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...but I must impute it to the disquiet that my mind has been in of late about my wife, and for my going these two days to plays..."

Women and the media...Always handy targets of blame.

in Aqua Scripto   Link to this

"and prove a good actor;" I wonder? what was the word written?????
Was this word be actor or actress? translated and/or edited, I wonder how many other words were made to fit the usage at the period of time of the transcription.

in Aqua Scripto   Link to this

Temptation. Looks dothe raise the the lower brain.
"...and in my way did take two turns forwards and backwards through the Fleete Ally to see a couple of pretty [strumpets] that stood off the doors there, and God forgive me I could scarce stay myself from going into their houses with them, so apt is my nature to evil after once, as I have these two days, set upon pleasure again...."
anquis in herbe.

TerryF   Link to this

L&M also have "actor", but good Q., i.A.S.

I wonder whether the gender distinctiom was not yet made because women were so recently onstage?

Wonder what the OED says about "actress"?

in Aqua Scripto   Link to this

If all else fails, look it up in the OddED. Sam does it again.
2. a. A female player on the stage. (ACTOR was at first used for both sexes.)
1666 PEPYS Diary 27 Dec., Doll Common doing Abigail most excellently, & Knipp the widow very well, & will be an excellent actor, I think. 1700 DRYDEN Epil. to Pilgrim 40 To stop the trade of love behind the scene, Where actresses make bold with married men.
Actress : [full circle]

A1. A female actor or doer. Obs. repl. by ACTOR.
1589 WARNER Albion's Eng. (1612) 335 Opportunitie, the chiefe Actresse in all attempts, gaue the Plaudite in Loue. 1596 C. FITZGEFFREY Sir F. Drake (1881) 25 Tasking your pens to pen a womans praise, And she the actresse of your owne disease. 1626 COCKERAM, Actresse, a woman doer. 1670 Lond. Gaz. cccclxviii. 1 A principal Lady of the Island who was proved to be an Actress or Accomplice in the assassinate.
At first used only in the general sense, not in the dramatic; now only in the dramatic, not in the general.
as the actress said to the bishop (or as the bishop said to the actress): a catch-phrase mischievously implying a sexual innuendo in a preceding innocent remark.

TerryF   Link to this

Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose.

Actor (F) 17c > Actress > late 20c Actor (F)

Lurker   Link to this

Why exactly...

"a couple of pretty [strumpets] that stood"

So, why the brackets ([]) ? Was this Weatley's doing, or DWs?

andy   Link to this

I could scarce stay myself from going into their houses with them,...
I must impute it to the disquiet that my mind has been in of late about my wife

it's Bess' fault, then..?!?

TerryF   Link to this

"So, why the brackets ([]) ? Was this Weatley’s doing, or DWs?"

They are in the Wheatley text, are characteristic of his taste; the euphemism is better than ". . . ." in serving the sense of what follows; usually a DW contribution is noted; so methinks Wheatley's.

* * *

"Plus ça change, &c" is an application of which I've come to have some Q's and of which I've repented as at least unnecessary.

TerryF   Link to this

"I have cleared all my times that I am to go to Court plays to the end of this month"

How many days are left in this month?!
Is this repentance or chicanery?

in Aqua Scripto   Link to this

The word [] used by Sam in his encounter of 'thems' that stand in doorways.
Was it the most common, that be the hore [whore]
[ 'wh' 16C addition] hore OE from the baltic surrounds. from Rhine to the Oder. known from 11 C on.

A Strumpet, be one that strums a a fiddle, sometimes known for extra curricula activities.
A prostitute was used for political types that sell their souls for gain.
Harlot more of the rogue, vagabond
the Latin prostituo -uere ui, -utum, to put up for sale, to prostitute. Prostibulum -i nt. prostitute.

in Aqua Scripto   Link to this

Yesterday in exchange alley "to purchase a book?" to-day it be Fleete Alley, for a fleeting glimpse of some ankles. Yet I was told never go down a blind alley.

Patricia   Link to this

It's amusing and so human to see Sam making deals with himself about plays and penalties.

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