Saturday 27 December 1662

Up, and while I am dressing I sent for my boy’s brother, William, that lives in town here as a groom, to whom and their sister Jane I told my resolution to keep the boy no longer. So upon the whole they desire to have him stay a week longer, and then he shall go. So to the office, and there Mr. Coventry and I sat till noon, and then I stept to the Exchange, and so home to dinner, and after dinner with my wife to the Duke’s Theatre, and saw the second part of “Rhodes,” done with the new Roxalana; which do it rather better in all respects for person, voice, and judgment, then the first Roxalana. Home with great content with my wife, not so well pleased with the company at the house to-day, which was full of citizens, there hardly being a gentleman or woman in the house; a couple of pretty ladies by us that made sport in it, being jostled and crowded by prentices. So home, and I to my study making up my monthly accounts, which is now fallen again to 630l. or thereabouts, which not long since was 680l., at which I am sorry, but I trust in God I shall get it up again, and in the meantime will live sparingly. So home to supper and to bed.

18 Annotations

Terry F   Link to this

"my monthly accounts,...which not long since was 680l."

Sam'l found himself worth 680l. on 30 September http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1662/09/30/ after having taken his wife to the Duke's House and seen "The Duchess of Malfi" co-starring his favorite "Ianthe," Mary Betterton.

Todd Bernhardt   Link to this

"not so well pleased with the company at the house to-day, which was full of citizens, there hardly being a gentleman or woman in the house"

Different times, when the word "citizen" was used as a slight...

in Aqua Scripto   Link to this

Oh! hoi polloi "... not so well pleased with the company at the house to-day, which was full of citizens, there hardly being a gentleman or woman in the house; a couple of pretty ladies by us that made sport in it, being jostled and crowded by prentices. ..." These be the Carlofian Fab concursi discipularum, having time between merry and happy, no Maifter to curb their enthufiasm. The graffes of Finfbury be a wee bit soggy, good for mud pies.

Jesse   Link to this

"I trust in God I shall get it up again"

Sorry. Anyway I assume many of us might see a drop in the monthly accounts this time of year. Though our drop be not for the same reason(s), we (at least I) still have the same trust.

Wim van der Meij   Link to this

So Wayneman overstepped the line a bit too often. He has been beaten eight times by Sam these last two years.

jeannine   Link to this

"So Wayneman overstepped the line a bit too often"...still, sort of sad to see him go, as he's probably still just a "kid". The household help turnover of late has given a new cook (Sarah's replacement) who is hardly ever mentioned, and no replacement for Gosnell. Hopefully the trend for good quiet repectable help won't continue. We need a replacement with some spunk to give us something to write about next year.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Something tells me it's the Wrath of sister Jane Wayneman needs to fear.

A. De Araujo   Link to this

"Wayneman"
His brother the Groom will have a saying also.

celtcahill   Link to this

We see now too, that Sam is in the way of no longer regarding himself as a mere 'citizen'.

Terry F   Link to this

Sam's regarded himself as a "gentleman" for a while.

October 30: "So I went; and the guard at the Tower Gate, making me leave my sword at the gate, I was forced to stay so long in the ale-house hard by, till my boy run home for my cloak"

L&M noted that when out and about a gentleman was properly dressed only if he carried a sword or wore some outerware.

Australian Susan   Link to this

I think it is to Sam's credit that he went to some trouble over Wayneman. Although we as 21st century people dislike the beatings which Sam inflicted on the boy (he's 12), it was normal practice for the time. Never specified, Wayneman misbehaved himself very badly when at Brampton, but Sam seems to have put that down to being in the country and Elizabeth's poor managing of him. He gives Wayneman another chance, but now seems to think he can do no more. Sam makes sure there is some kind of family conference over this: ensuring the facts (as Sam lays them down of course!) are known to the family before Wayneman is sent back to his parents. Do we ever know what happened to him? Did he turn out bad?

Bradford   Link to this

Neither we nor Pepys have seen the last of Wayneman yet, Susan; and it will be November 1663 before he passes out of the story (at least according to the index in "The Shorter Pepys").

A. De Araujo   Link to this

"Do we ever know what happened to him"
I thought about that also, thinking if I were in his shoes I would have emigrated to America,but (SPOILER) methinks with the catastrophes to come it would be difficult to trace him.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Rhodes II! Bigger and better than Ever!

This preview is rated PG-13...

The fiendish Archenemy of all Christendom...Backed by the greatest fleet and army of all time.

"Rhodes has not yet fallen?!" Suleyman the Magnificent fumes with narrow look at trembling Admiral of the Fleet.

"You've failed me for the last time, Admiral." Sound of whizzing swords, plunk of falling head.

***

The virtuous, wronged Christian heroine, Ianthe...

***
The courageous, if dim-witted Duke, Defender of Christendom...

***
The sly and treacherous betrayer would lead the Duke and his forces to disaster...
(Hey there always is one...)

***
And the usual comic relief frightened soldiers and idiot peasants...

***
The fate of all Christian Europe hangs in the balance. Don't miss "Siege of Rhodes, II!"
***

dirk   Link to this

"making up my monthly accounts, which is now fallen again to 630l. or thereabouts, which not long since was 680l."

Just for the record:
£630 in 1662 would now be £51,579.58
£680 in 1662 would now be £55,673.20

[based on historical retail price index data, calculation for the year 2002 -- later years not available]
http://eh.net/hmit/ppowerbp/

dirk   Link to this

the above index calculations

To convert the calculated value for 2002 to the year 2005, multiply by 1.09

This gives
£630 = 56221.74
£680 = 60683.79

Why?
191.8 = average r.p.i. for 2005 (11 months)
176.2 = average r.p.i. for 2002
This gives a factor of 1.09
[Based on data found on:
http://www.devon.gov.uk/dris/economic/retprice.... ]

As has been mentioned on earlier occasions, these figures should be taken as a reasonable approximation only -- as retail price index (r.p.i.) data from the 17th century are not up to modern standards -- and even if they were, the r.p.i. is only one way to put a average value on income and expenses...

in Aqua Scripto   Link to this

Remember this 630 quid be 185 % of his annual income, the bonus be?
How many can accomplish all of this, purchases, have Maids, entertainment and more, own thy income.

Patricia   Link to this

Re Pepys' household accounts: he eats at M'Lord's and others' houses so often, that should be saving him a pretty penny.

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