Friday 7 December 1660

This morning the judge Advocate Fowler came to see me, and he and I sat talking till it was time to go to the office. To the office and there staid till past 12 o’clock, and so I left the Comptroller and Surveyor and went to Whitehall to my Lord’s, where I found my Lord gone this morning to Huntingdon, as he told me yesterday he would. I staid and dined with my Lady, there being Laud the page’s mother there, and dined also with us, and seemed to have been a very pretty woman and of good discourse.

Before dinner I examined Laud in his Latin and found him a very pretty boy and gone a great way in Latin.

After dinner I took a box of some things of value that my Lord had left for me to carry to the Exchequer, which I did, and left them with my Brother Spicer, who also had this morning paid 1000l. for me by appointment to Sir R. Parkhurst. So to the Privy Seal, where I signed a deadly number of pardons, which do trouble me to get nothing by. Home by water, and there was much pleased to see that my little room is likely to come to be finished soon.

I fell a-reading Fuller’s History of Abbys, and my wife in Great Cyrus till twelve at night, and so to bed.

12 Annotations

chris   Link to this

What are these deadly pardons that seem to trouble Sam today?

Alan Bedford   Link to this

"What are these deadly pardons that seem to trouble Sam today?"

I'd be inclined to think that Sam's troubled because there will be no money coming to him for signning and sealing these pardons. The money Sam earns from his Privy Seal position comes from those who are petitioning the King, or are having official papers registered. No money is generated from the acts of the King (such as these pardons.)

Paul Miller   Link to this

"and my wife in Great Cyrus till twelve at night"

Longest novel in French Literature, 10 volumes. Elizabeth will not need to browse the book stalls anytime soon.

Scudéry, Madeleine de [1656], Artamène ou le grand Cyrus

online text
http://www.artamene.org/

vincent   Link to this

"...So to the Privy Seal, where I signed a deadly number of pardons, which do trouble me to get nothing by..." I presume, from the on going trials of the lesser mortals. Those who signed the request and were disallowed?
But I do love the phrase "deadly number of pardons".
Again NO compensation for the waxing of the waning lives.

Larry Bunce   Link to this

Sam has used various forms of 'to bed' so far, but is this the first instance of the complete 'and so to bed?'

Pauline   Link to this

"...left them with my Brother Spicer, who also had this morning paid 1000l. for me by appointment to Sir R. Parkhurst."
I wonder if this box of jewels to the Exchequer brought in the 1000l and this is money to "settle the militia."

Mary   Link to this

The box of jewels

I'm not sure that the jewels and the sum of £1000 are so closely connected. The words “who ALSO had this morning” read as if the two matters are concurrent rather than consequent upon one another.

Yesterday Sam was asked to ‘lay up’ these valuables; to lay up usually means to store, put safely away, to save for future use. Sandwich is going to be out of town for a few days; he wants to be sure that these items will be in safe storage whilst he is away.

David Goldfarb   Link to this

>is this the first instance of the complete "and so to bed?"

Hardly. The first instance of the phrase was January 4, 1659/60; the first time it was the very end of the entry was February 10.

Bardi McLennan   Link to this

"and so to bed" has become SP's signature phrase, but "that I ever have seen in my life before" runs a close second. When I was 12 my English teacher told me I wrote a better run-on sentence than Pepys - and from that day he has been My Man!

Ruben   Link to this

"that I ever have seen in my life before" is an exalted way to remind the reader that life is a wonderful adventure.

Daniel Baker   Link to this

Pepys does not mention what he and Judge Advocate Fowler talked about. Fowler's visit comes soon after Pepys helped advance the plan to pay the seamen half their wages in cash and the other half in tickets at interest; perhaps Fowler has questions about the legality of this? Fowler either was or soon would be in charge of the Chatham Chest for disabled seamen, and thus was to some degree responsible for their welfare.

Bill   Link to this

"there being Laud the page’s mother’ there"

If Laud is really Laud Crisp http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/536/ , as Wheatley (1896) suggests, then his mother is Mrs. Crisp: http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/534/

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