Wednesday 5 December 1660

This morning the Proposal which I wrote the last night I showed to the officers this morning, and was well liked of, and I wrote it fair for Sir. G. Carteret to show to the King, and so it is to go to the Parliament.

I dined at home, and after dinner I went to the new Theatre and there I saw “The Merry Wives of Windsor” acted, the humours of the country gentleman and the French doctor very well done, but the rest but very poorly, and Sir J. Falstaffe as bad as any.

From thence to Mr. Will. Montagu’s chamber to have sealed some writings tonight between Sir R. Parkhurst and myself about my Lord’s 2000l., but he not coming, I went to my father’s and there found my mother still ill of the stone, and had just newly voided one, which she had let drop into the chimney, and looked and found it to shew it me.1 From thence home and to bed.


14 Annotations

vincent  •  Link

"..I went to the new Theatre and there I saw 'The Merry Wives of Windsor' acted, the humours of the country gentleman and the French doctor very well done, but the rest but very poorly, and Sir J. Falstaffe t as bad as any…”
For those that have had the pleasure , here are two reading sites:
http://www.literaturepage.com/read/shakespeare-...
http://www.shakespeare-literature.com/The_Merry...
for A synopsis
http://www.sparknotes.com/shakespeare/merrywive...

z…Their main point is that wives can be merry and faithful at the same time—that is, that they can lead boisterous, vivid lives without betraying their duties to their husbands—…” not my review.

vincent  •  Link

I missed the "...have NOT had ..."

vincent  •  Link

Good hard work appears to have paid off. I beleive it always does, when you save the "CO." money. The reward was to see some pointers in Female logic.

steve h  •  Link

Playgoing afternoons

Note that plays were performed in the afternoon after the mid-day dinner, not in the evening, and that Pepys willoften go back to work after. It's sort like us sneaking out to a movie in the middle of the work day, except without guilt.

Mary  •  Link

Matinee performances

These apparently began at 3 p.m. In summer, the whole play would have been performed during hours of daylight, but in mid-winter, with sunset before 4 p.m., it must have been very difficult for spectators at the rear of the theatre to see much of what was happening on stage, even with the beneit of wax, rather than tallow, candles.

Mary House  •  Link

It appears that Pepys attends these plays without his wife. Was it not customary at the time for women to attend the theater? Or is it simply the case that she would have been otherwise occupied in the middle of the day.

J A Gioia  •  Link

had just newly voided one, which she had let drop into the chimney, and looked and found it to shew it me

i think we can file this one under: Mother; too much information.

vincent  •  Link

"..into the chimney...." the fireplace and [grate] I presume.

Charlezzzzz  •  Link

"..into the chimney".- the fireplace and [grate] I presume.

There was a time (I forget the date) when Pepys found no chamber pot in his room. He reported that he pissed in the chimney.

Aqua  •  Link

new info to help "into the chimney"
From Ian Evans http://www.pepysdiary.com/about/archive/2006/08...

The corrected portion of the text for 5 December 1660 is as follows:
…..I went to my father’s. And there found my mother still ill of the stone and hath just voided one, which she hath let drop into the Chimny; and could not find it to show it me. From thence home and to bed.

Phil Gyford  •  Link

I've now added a note to the entry pointing out this discrepancy.

meech  •  Link

A very late response to Mary House regarding SP not taking his wife to the play...

I think it is more that it is either the lifestyle at this point in time or at least Sam's lifestyle not to take his wife with him. As I'm sure you've noticed he takes her very few places. He goes to taverns and drinks with men, (although a few times there's been a wife present), to people's homes, including his family, and dines with them without her, to plays, to promenade Westminster Hall and get the latest gossip, etc., while Elizabeth is presumably at home. As I've said before, he lives as if he were single most of the time, and goes and does as he pleases. I can only hope she also has another life going for her. Or is she at home doing the wash and other household chores all the time?

meech  •  Link

AND...although he does sometimes take her with him, he often leaves her somewhere, like his or her parents, and then goes off on his own. But there may be a perfectly good reason for all this. Just not sure what it could be.

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