Tuesday 4 December 1660

To Whitehall to Sir G. Carteret’s chamber, where all the officers met, and so we went up to the Duke of York, and he took us into his closet, and we did open to him our project of stopping the growing charge of the fleet by paying them in hand one moyety, and the other four months hence. This he do like, and we returned by his order to Sir G. Carteret’s chamber, and there we did draw up this design in order to be presented to the Parliament. From thence I to my Lord’s, and dined with him and told him what we had done to-day. Sir Tho. Crew dined with my Lord to-day, and we were very merry with Mrs. Borfett, who dined there still as she has always done lately. After dinner Sir Tho. and my Lady to the Playhouse to see “The Silent Woman.” I home by water, and with Mr. Hater in my chamber all alone he and I did put this morning’s design into order, which being done I did carry it to Sir W. Batten, where I found some gentlemen with him (Sir W. Pen among the rest pretty merry with drink) playing at cards, and there I staid looking upon them till one o’clock in the morning, and so Sir W. Pen and I went away, and I to bed. This day the Parliament voted that the bodies of Oliver, Ireton, Bradshaw, &c.,1 should be taken up out of their graves in the Abbey, and drawn to the gallows, and there hanged and buried under it: which (methinks) do trouble me that a man of so great courage as he was, should have that dishonour, though otherwise he might deserve it enough.

  1. [Latham & Matthews show a blank space here and suggest it should be filled by the name Pride. P.G.]

31 Annotations

dirk   Link to this

Maps of London

This is something which belongs in the background info, but I couldn't find the right place for it. Since it may be of general interest I just put it here.

A beautiful map of London 1642:
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~genmap...

Dito, after 1666:
http://www.library.yale.edu/MapColl/lonfire.htm

vincent   Link to this

"..This day the Parliament voted .....should have that dishonour, though otherwise he might deserve it enough..."
Falsum etiam est verum quod consuit superior [rex].
from Syrus, Maximus

A. De Araujo   Link to this

"the bodies.....should be taken up out of their graves....to the gallows and there hanged" The past is indeed a foreign country!!!

dirk   Link to this

"This day the Parliament voted..."

I vividly recall the scene from the BBC1 series "Charles II - The Power and the Passion" (part 2 went on TV last sunday)... And the comment of the narrator that whatever had been the faults of Cromwell, he (the narrator) regretted that there was no tomb one could go to, to contemplate on a man whose role in English history has been so vital.

language hat   Link to this

The Silent Woman:
A play by Ben Jonson; description (on a site for a 2003 production) here:
http://www.shakespearedc.org/pastprod/silent.html

You can read the play here:
http://www.knowledgerush.com/paginated_txt/etex...

dirk   Link to this

Maps of London

The map references are now where they should be. I had looked for a place to put them under "Places", and overlooked "General Reference".

vincent   Link to this

"...our project of stopping the growing charge of the fleet by paying them in hand one moyety, and the other four months hence..."
brilliant, sack them ['tis redundancy time ]{Lay off} then give half, so no more running up the tab [bills] then pay of the ballance off latter[no interest of course?].
one moyety [moiety-one half or equal shares}
ME moite,

vincent   Link to this

"...we returned by his order to Sir G. Carteret's chamber, and there we did draw up this design in order to be presented to the Parliament…” “got ’ SGC’s moniker on the plan”
“…I home by water, and with Mr. Hater in my chamber all alone he and I did put this morning�s design into order, which being done I did carry it to Sir W. Batten,…” then all the nitty gritty had to be done , it is all in the details and fine print {then Kinkos}. It looks like business before pleasure {the play that is:”… With such we mingle neither brains nor breasts;
Our wishes, like to those make public feasts,
Are not to please the cook’s taste, but the guests..”’}

but he did get a little “fun”
“Aperte mala cum est mulier, tum demum est bona” Syrus , Maxims

helena murphy   Link to this

If I am not mistaken there is a fine imposing sculpture of Oliver Cromwell on horseback outside the Houses of Parliament in London for all those who wish to contemplate him and his role in the history of the three kingdoms.This is probably preferable to a tomb within the Abbey,of which many are so well buried beneath the Henry VII chapel that they cannot be seen at all.

Kevin S   Link to this

Forty years ago it was accepted, in Cambridge at least, that Oliver Cromwell's head was buried beneath the quad of Corpus Christi College. I have not been able to find any recent references to this. Another myth?

Ruben   Link to this

a Cromwell cum Parliament image

http://www.scholars.nus.edu.sg/landow/victorian...

PHE   Link to this

Greatest Briton?
Its interesting to note that despite Cromwell's fall from grace described here, he recently came within the top 10 of the 'Great Britons' public vote.

WGY   Link to this

I believe that Cromwell's head is somewhere in the precincts of Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge (where he had been a student, and whose portrait of him used to be curtained so that he could be hidden during the loyal toast)

Orrin   Link to this

Wow! Thanks for the map, Dirk. I had been noticing when I looked at the various map references given here how circumscribed the area that our Sam perambulates. It did seem a bit restricted. And yes, I knew that London was much smaller but *that* much smaller?! Wow!

A very nice addition to the site. Thanks again.

Brian G McMullen   Link to this

The other map that has proved very helpful is the Rocque 1746 map. You can find the link in the Maps area of the General Reference. Many of the locations mentioned in the diary are noted on the map. I have taken many a 'virtual' stroll with SP as he has decribed his commutes.

Tom Carr   Link to this

Oliver Cromwell's Head
Apparently Oliver's head has had quite a history itself.
http://www.historic-uk.com/HistoryUK/England-Hi...

The History Channel also did a story on this some time ago. The name of the program was "History's Lost & Found", but alas, I've been unable to find the episode.

Nix   Link to this

Paying off the balance later --

I believe the proposal included interest (if this is the same one discussed earlier). But of course the discharged sailors needed (or wanted) their money NOW, if only to go off on a bender. So some lively entrepreneurs undoubtedly step in to buy the notes for cash, at a substantial discount, and turn a nice profit. As ever through history, the working stiff gets stiffed.

Terry Downing   Link to this

John Bradshaw, Oliver Cromwell, Henry Ireton and Thomas Pride were all posthumously tried for high treason. They were found guilty and in January 1661 their corpses were exhumed and hung in chains at Tyburn.

Nix   Link to this

"a man of so great courage" --

Recall that Samuel's family (and Montague's) hail from Cromwell's home turf in Huntingdon, and as members of local gentry presumably have a long history with him on both the personal and the political levels.

Patrick Blake   Link to this

Another Cromwellian whose body was disinterred from the Abbey and reburied elsewhere was that of my ancestor, Admiral Robert Blake, whose efforts on behalf of both country and the Navy preceded Pepy's by only a few years.

vincent   Link to this

another source for Ben Jonson "The Silent Women".
title for your perusal
eotsw10.zip - 125 KB Plain text (zipped)
Jonson, Ben, 1573?-1637
from
http://gutenberg.net/cgi-bin/search/t9.cgi?ftps...

Kevin S   Link to this

WGY: I stand corrected. I misremembered my colleges - Sidney Sussex is adjacent to Corpus, if I remember rightly. As to Cromwell's head, it did indeed have an 'interesting' history. According to Britannica it was on display in London for 25 years(!?), after which it ended up in the hands of a 'private collector'. As A. De Araujo says: "The past is indeed a foreign country"

George Peabody   Link to this

Well, the past is perhaps not all that foreign - witness the recent post-mortem travels of Albert Einstein's brain!

Peter   Link to this

There is a very full description of the fate of Cromwell's head in the final chapter of Antonia Fraser's book "Cromwell Our Chief of Men", including photos ... (not for the faint-hearted!). As the entire body was embalmed before the original burial, the head was in good condition in spite of being at mercy of the elements for more than 20 years on a spike.
Apparently a whole series of legends grew up to the effect that the body disinterred was not really Cromwell's or that a different body had been substituted before the hanging and decapitation. Some apparently claimed that he had been secretly buried on the old battlefield of Naseby and that the tomb in the Abbey was empty.
Antonia Fraser says: "Recently (she wrote the book in the mid-1970's) in a correspondence in The Times on the subject of Cromwell's last resting place, Mr Reginald Paget MP, supporting the Naseby theory, produced an even more remarkable link with history: his father that his grandfather had known an old man in Naseby whose great uncle remembered as a boy the coach arriving in the night from London. Spades were collected; the coach then departed in the direction of the battlefield, and the next day a certain field had been freshly ploughed although it was not the ploughing season." An excellent story, although Antonia Fraser concludes that the head and the body hanged and decapitated were really those of Cromwell.

Laura K   Link to this

tried posthumously

Ah, nothing like a fair trial. A bit of history to make Joe Stalin proud.

vincent   Link to this

"aperte...bona."
a translation when a woman is shown to be bad she is at last good.

Mary Merivel   Link to this

The whole story about Oliver Cromwell's head is published here (with photos and all the things you want to know about the subject):
http://edweb.camcnty.gov.uk/serv/default.asp?ta...

I'd like to bless Mr. Pepys for his comment about "dishonour", because there was no thing so repulsive after Restoration than that barbarous punishment of dead. I think King Charles II was the man with a great lack of taste.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"John Bradshaw, Oliver Cromwell, Henry Ireton and Thomas Pride were all posthumously tried for high treason. They were found guilty and in January 1661 their corpses were exhumed and hung in chains at Tyburn.

This very day in Commons the exhumation plan was proposed:

Regicides Carcases to be taken up. http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?co...

Resolved, That the Carcases of Oliver Cromwell, Henry Ireton, John Bradshaw, and Thomas Pride, whether buried in Westminster Abbey, or elsewhere, be, with all Expedition, taken up, and drawn upon a Hurdle to Tiburne, and there hanged up in their Coffins for some time; and after that buried under the said Gallows: And that James Norfolke Esquire, Serjeant at Arms attending the House of Commons, do take care that this Order be put in effectual Execution.

Ordered, That the Lords Concurrence herein be desired: And Mr. Tytus is to carry it to the Lords.

Bill   Link to this

"the Parliament voted that the bodies of Oliver, Ireton, Bradshaw, &c.,1 should be taken up out of their graves in the Abbey..."

The names of Cromwell, Ireton, and Bradshaw are not found in the Registers of Westminster Abbey. Colonel Chester, in his edition of the "Registers" (p. 521), prints the royal warrant for a further exhumation of Commonwealth personages, dated September 9th, 1661. This warrant contains twenty-one names, and these bodies were re-interred on the green on the north side of the Abbey, between the north transept and the west end.
---Wheatley (1896).

Sasha Clarkson   Link to this

It's interesting that Cromwell was referred to as "Oliver", but the rest by their surnames.

Incidentally, he still has his fans here in Wales. There is a firm in Welsh-speaking Cardigan known as "O C Davies A'r Mab" (Oliver Cromwell Davies and son.)

Tonyel   Link to this

For UK listeners, a new series of extracts from the diary starts next week on BBC Radio 4.
Unfortunately, judging by the trailer, the readings are in a quiet, rather dull voice. My mental image of Sam's speech is that it would be lively and amusing as befits a man who was obviously very popular and sociable.

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