Saturday 10 November 1660

Up early. Sir Wm. Batten and I to make up an account of the wages of the officers and mariners at sea, ready to present to the Committee of Parliament this afternoon. Afterwards came the Treasurer and Comptroller, and sat all the morning with us till the business was done.

So we broke up, leaving the thing to be wrote over fair and carried to Trinity House for Sir Wm. Batten’s hand. When staying very long I found (as appointed) the Treasurer and Comptroller at Whitehall, and so we went with a foul copy to the Parliament house, where we met with Sir Thos. Clarges and Mr. Spry, and after we had given them good satisfaction we parted.

The Comptroller and I to the coffee-house, where he shewed me the state of his case; how the King did owe him about 6000l.. But I do not see great likelihood for them to be paid, since they begin already in Parliament to dispute the paying of the just sea-debts, which were already promised to be paid, and will be the undoing of thousands if they be not paid.

So to Whitehall to look but could not find Mr. Fox, and then to Mr. Moore at Mr. Crew’s, but missed of him also. So to Paul’s Churchyard, and there bought Montelion, which this year do not prove so good as the last was; so after reading it I burnt it.

After reading of that and the comedy of the Rump, which is also very silly, I went to bed. This night going home, Will and I bought a goose.

11 Annotations

Bullus Hutton   Link to this

A rare insight into the actual workings of Sam's day (apart from networking, gambling and drinking) he spends all this morning doing some heavy duty number-crunching with a couple of high-level bean-counters, assists with the formalities of presentation-quality accounts, but makes sure a rough copy gets over to the Parliament buildings, where there is a need to know the bottom line figure as quickly as possible.
His work done, and any explanations completed to the clients satisfaction, he can relax in a coffee-house (presumably chosen by the Comptroller, who is unwilling to muddle his accounting brain with strong ale) and indulge in phlosopical discussion as to the ramifications of the king's failure to pay the required 6,000l.
Business having been taken care of, it's off to the bookstore for some entertaining reading!

James Cridland   Link to this

Montelion appears to be entertaining reading, certainly.

It's mentioned here: http://35.1911encyclopedia.org/P/PH/PHILLIPS_ED...
...I can't work out whether John Phillips is supposed to the author of this book, or whether, more likely, it is a 1660 annual equivalent of Private Eye. It seems to be "full of co(a)rse royalist wit", and the 1661 and 1662 editions are not by the same author.

language hat   Link to this

"and there bought Montelion":
From the 1911 Britannica:
JOHN PHILLIPS (1631-1706), in 1652 published a Latin reply to the anonymous attack on Milton entitled Pro Rege et populo anglicano. He appears to have acted as unofficial secretary to Milton, but, disappointed of regular political employment, and chafing against the discipline he was under, he published in 1655 a bitter attack on Puritanism entitled a Satyr against Hypocrites (1655). In 1656 he was summoned before the privy council for his share in a book of licentious poems, Sportive Wit, which was suppressed by the authorities but almost immediately replaced by a similar collection, Wit and Drollery. In Montelion (1660) he ridiculed the astrological almanacs of William Lilly. Two other skits of this name, in i661 and 1662, also full of course royalist wit, were probably by another hand.

Eric Walla   Link to this

Just a reminder about the rise of coffee, which had just percolated up into England within the previous ten years. If you haven't read them, the posts on coffee are particularly stimulating:

http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/361/

Even if you don't care beans about the subject I would suggest imbibing.

vincent   Link to this

Promises promises until the deed is done
"...since they begin already in Parliament to dispute the paying of the just sea-debts, which were already promised to be paid, and will be the undoing of thousands if they be not paid...." Always get the money up Front. " Remember the great cheering by the Tars.
SP is right, there could be great undoing if that bunch get loose in London town and no Ale money, forget the perculator, the bung could be go sky high, there being no Militia around to help out the night watchmen. There is nothing worse than unsatisfied old Salts that cannot get a mouth on a pint of ale and and arm around a wench.

Peter   Link to this

The Comptroller's £6,000….According to L&M, Slingsby had delivered a petition to the King in May 1660 (he certainly got in early!) “referring, among other things, to £5,800 owed him by the late King ‘for arms delivered’” He died in October 1661 according to the background note on this site. Presumably Sam’s assesment that he would never be paid was correct…..

Bill   Link to this

"there bought Montelion, which this year do not prove so good as the last was; so after reading it I burnt it."

"Montelion, the Prophetical Almanac for the year 1660, 8vo, with a frontispiece, by John Phillips." The Montelions for 1661 and 1662 were written by Thomas Klatman. It would appear that Pepys bought the Montelion for 1661, as there had not been one for 1659.—See Watt's Bibliotheca.
---Diary and correspondence of Samuel Pepys, the diary deciphered by J. Smith. 1854.

Bill   Link to this

"the comedy of the Rump"

"The Rump, or the Mirror of the late Times," a comedy, by John Tatham.
---Diary and correspondence of Samuel Pepys, the diary deciphered by J. Smith. 1854.

Matthew Moppett   Link to this

"there bought Montelion, which this year do not prove so good as the last was; so after reading it I burnt it."

This seems to be a fairly extreme reaction. Was the (private) burning of books one took a dislike to a common practice in the 17th Century?

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"After reading...the comedy of the Rump, which is also very silly, I went to bed."

L&M note this was "The Rump, or the Mirror of the late Times," a satirical comedy of the Cromwellian régime by John Tatham, acted at Dorset Court, printed in 1660 and 1661, and it is not in the Pepysian Library.

http://books.google.com/books?id=oBNxJ0S-VVAC&p...

Chris Squire UK   Link to this

MM: I suggest that he burnt it to be rid of it because it contained subversive and rude, perhaps lewd, comments about some of those now in power which he, as a rising respectable civil servant, would be embarrassed to be found to have purchased and read if he disposed of the book some other way or kept it and it came to public notice. So burning it was not extreme - it was a quick and practical and untraceable way of disposing of something which was only intended as ephemera.

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