Friday 9 October 1668

[In this part of the “Diary” no entry occurs for thirteen days, though there are several pages left blank. During the interval Pepys went into the country, as he subsequently mentions his having been at Saxham, in Suffolk, during the king’s visit to Lord Crofts, which took place at this time (see October 23rd, host). He might also probably have gone to Impington to fetch his wife. The pages left blank were never filled up. — B.]

[Either this day or the previous one, Pepys visited his wife, Mercer, Deb. and Will Hewer, who had all been staying with his cousin Roger Pepys in Impington. — P.G.]


8 Annotations

Terry Foreman  •  Link

9 Oct. 1668 John Bunyan -- though a prisoner now in Bedford's County gaol -- is recorded as present in church for the first time since Oct. 1661.

"Bunyan, in Dr. Brown's words, "had an amount of liberty which in the case of a prisoner nowadays would be simply impossible." But the mistake has been made of extending to the whole period an indulgence which belonged only to a part, and that a very limited part of it. When we are told that Bunyan was treated as a prisoner at large, and like one "on parole," free to come and go as he pleased, even as far as London, we must remember that Bunyan's own words expressly restrict this indulgence to the six months between the Autumn Assizes of 1661 and the Spring Assizes of 1662. "Between these two assizes," he says, "I had by my jailer some liberty granted me more than at the first." This liberty was certainly of the largest kind consistent with his character of a prisoner. The church books show that he was occasionally present at their meetings, and was employed on the business of the congregation. Nay, even his preaching, which was the cause of his imprisonment, was not forbidden. "I followed," he says, writing of this period, "my wonted course of preaching, taking all occasions that were put into my hand to visit the people of God." But this indulgence was very brief and was brought sharply to an end. It was plainly irregular, and depended on the connivance of his jailer. We cannot be surprised that when it came to the magistrates' ears - "my enemies," Bunyan rather unworthily calls them - they were seriously displeased. Confounding Bunyan with the Fifth Monarchy men and other turbulent sectaries, they imagined that his visits to London had a political object, "to plot, and raise division, and make insurrections," which, he honestly adds, "God knows was a slander." The jailer was all but "cast out of his place," and threatened with an indictment for breach of trust, while his own liberty was so seriously "straitened" that he was prohibited even "to look out at the door." The last time Bunyan's name appears as present at a church meeting is October 28, 1661, nor do we see it again till October 9, 1668, only four years before his twelve years term of imprisonment expired. "

*The Life of John Bunyan* by Edmund Venables, Chapter 6
http://www.web-books.com/Classics/ON/B0/B340/Buny…

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Bunyan

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"*The Pilgrim's Progress from This World to That Which Is to Come* is a Christian allegory written by John Bunyan and published in February, 1678. It is regarded as one of the most significant works of religious English literature, has been translated into more than 200 languages, and has never been out of print. Bunyan began his work while in the Bedfordshire county gaol for violations of the Conventicle Act, which prohibited the holding of religious services outside the auspices of the established Church of England. Early Bunyan scholars like John Brown believed The Pilgrim's Progress was begun in Bunyan's second shorter imprisonment for six months in 1675, but more recent scholars like Roger Sharrock believe that it was begun during Bunyan's initial, more lengthy imprisonment from 1660-1672 right after he had written his spiritual autobiography, *Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners.*"
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Pilgrim%27s_Prog…

Terry Foreman  •  Link

Nov. 9.

Port Royal, Jamai ca. Richard Browne to Williamson. Arrived in Jamaica the 14th Oct. with the Oxford frigate. Nothing of news since, only Capt. Costing, a small privateer of this place, with two or three guns, four days since brought in a Spanish vessel of 200 tons, eight guns, and 12 "peturders," the cargo, as they report, worth 40,000l. or 50,000l. She came in a fleet of 14 sail, and this Spaniard bore up and said he would hoist Costing in, but he was much deceived. About the middle of August last the fleet of privateers returned from taking Porto Bello : hears it thus, that six captains with 500 men took the town and three castles and kept them 30 days, and redelivered them for 100,000 pieces of eight, besides what they plundered the town of, which was very rich. They are all gone out again, on what design he cannot tell, but one Capt. Morgan is their admiral. The Oxford is victualling for six months to cruise by herself as a private ship of war on the Spanish coasts : what her further design is he cannot say, but if he likes it not this bout he shall by the first return. Has delivered Lord Arlington's "letter of recommendation" to Sir Thos. Modyford, who has promised to do anything that offers. Indorsed, Rec. Feb. 10, 1668-9. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXIII., No. 76.]
https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-paper…

Terry Foreman  •  Link

Nov. 9.

Port Royal, Jamai ca. Richard Browne to Williamson. Arrived in Jamaica the 14th Oct. with the Oxford frigate. Nothing of news since, only Capt. Costing, a small privateer of this place, with two or three guns, four days since brought in a Spanish vessel of 200 tons, eight guns, and 12 "peturders," the cargo, as they report, worth 40,000l. or 50,000l. She came in a fleet of 14 sail, and this Spaniard bore up and said he would hoist Costing in, but he was much deceived. About the middle of August last the fleet of privateers returned from taking Porto Bello : hears it thus, that six captains with 500 men took the town and three castles and kept them 30 days, and redelivered them for 100,000 pieces of eight, besides what they plundered the town of, which was very rich. They are all gone out again, on what design he cannot tell, but one Capt. Morgan is their admiral. The Oxford is victualling for six months to cruise by herself as a private ship of war on the Spanish coasts : what her further design is he cannot say, but if he likes it not this bout he shall by the first return. Has delivered Lord Arlington's "letter of recommendation" to Sir Thos. Modyford, who has promised to do anything that offers. Indorsed, Rec. Feb. 10, 1668-9. 1 p. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXIII., No. 76.]
https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-paper…

Terry Foreman  •  Link

Nov. 9.

Boston. [M. De Morillon Du Bourg] to the Western Company of France. According to his commission from the King and the orders of the King of England he has attended M. de Belle Isle all along the coast of Acadie to see the places marked in his instructions, but as he could not establish himself there without conferring with Sir Thos. Temple, he has come to Boston to do so. Sir Thos. has received the King of England's letter and the Articles of the Treaty very well, but he makes a great difference between Acadie and Nova Scotia, which he says belongs to him, and which he makes to lie from Mirliguesche to Pentagoet, and Acadie from Mirliguesche along Cape Breton to the river of Quebec, so that Pentagoet, St. Jean, Port Royal, Cap de Sable, and La Heve, specified in his orders, are not in Acadie, but in Nova Scotia ; besides, he says that M. de Belle Isle ought not to remain in Port Royal, and complains of some violence done by him to some of his people. And, turning to the Treaty, he maintains that the French ought to have first surrendered St. Christopher's, Antigua, and Montserrat, which is far from being done, for there is certain news that the English Governor-General having been twice to M. De la Barre to tell him what ought to be done by the Treaty, he replied he would put to the sword all who should come to re-establish themselves, without regard to age or sex ; on which Sir Thos. wishes to be enlightened before concluding anything with him. This is very vexatious, for the season is very advanced, the country rough, and he has no place of security, but he will not give in at the first obstacles. Indorsed, Copie de la lettre crite a Messrs. De la Compagnie d'Occident par le Sieur De Morillon Du Bourg, Commissaire Deput par le Roi de France pour l'execution du Trait de Breda en l'Acadie. French, 3 pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXIII., No. 77.]
https://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-paper…

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

The volume of Domestic State Papers covering correspondence from Oct. 1668 to Dec. 1669 is at
https://play.google.com/books/reader?id=vik5AQAAM…
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Oct. 9 1668.
Letter Office, London
James Hickes to Rob. Francis.

Thanks for the book sent by Charles (Perrot).
Encloses 20s. from Hen. Barnard for half a year's intelligence.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 247, No. 132.]

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Oct. 9 1668.
Yarmouth
Rich. Bower to Williamson.

A letter from Secretary Morice was read in the assembly of Aldermen and Common Council, intimating that his Majesty took notice that several persons were taken into offices without taking the prescribed oaths, and warning them to take care for the future, as this, if neglected, would create great mischief.

There have already crept into the Common Council some who frequently keep the greatest conventicles in the town.
Since Mr. Bridge's coming, the Independent faction is grown so high that the Minister will be forced to lay aside the performing of his duty in the burial of the dead, their rudeness being such that they not only jeer and laugh at him, but make a noise, that he may not be heard;
some have been so impudent as to lay their hands on his book.
Others, more modest, have buried their dead by stealth.

The prayers and the thanksgiving for his Majesty's restoration was torn out of the Common Prayer as it lay in the church.

Their ringleader, Mr. Bridge, is grown so high that he threatens his members with excommunication if they go to hear our ministers.
He has seduced several of late, and made them members of his congregation, and takes upon himself to baptize their children.
Were our ministers, as I fear too many others are, of an evil life and conversation, or anyways turbulent, they might pretend some colour for their madness;
but as the ministers have applause for their sober carriage, courteous behaviour, and sound doctrine, the grief and trouble must be at the ordinance.
If some care is not taken to stop their madness, it may be divined what will ensue.
A gentleman has been sent down by the King to take a survey of the town which has bred the belief that his Majesty will be soon here.

Great quantities of herrings have been brought in lately.
[14 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 247, No. 133.]
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Mr. Bridge was a local minister (1600 - 1670) who preached against King Charles I. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Bridge
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According to wiki, Charles Ii had plans for Yarmouth:
In 1668 Charles II incorporated Little Yarmouth into the borough by a charter with one brief exception remaining in force until 1703, when Queen Anne replaced the two bailiffs by a mayor.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Yarmouth

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

Oct. 9 1668.
Audley Inn
Lord Arlington to Williamson.

Arrival and despatch of letters.
I wonder anybody should imagine there needed the formality of entering Secretary Trevor into all the Committees of the Council where Secretary Morice sat, as secretaries have always sat ex officio;
notwithstanding, I moved his Majesty, who laughed at me for the doubt.

The Lord Chamberlain has arrived; I will speak to him concerning their Majesties' going to Cambridge, but they have both promised that the University shall have six days' warning at least, for the preparation of their speeches.

I have written to the Lord General, by his Majesty's command, concerning the disposal of the men come from Portugal.

The French Ambassadress must have been misinformed, else she could not possibly have taken ill her Majesty's refusal to see her.

Let the Prince of Ligny's papers be looked out, that I may see whether it will be fit for his Majesty to move anything in it, or what kind of answer to make to the Prince.
[S.P. Dom., Car.II. 247, No. 134.]

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Oct. 9 1668.
Chapter House, Chester
Hen. Bridgeman, dean, and the chapter to the King.

Signify their election of Dr. John Wilkins as bishop.
(Latin, parchment. [S.P. Dom., Car.II. 247, No. 135.]
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Archbihop George Hall, deceased

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Oct. 9 1668.
Licence
to John, Viscount Mordaunt, to travel beyond seas for the benefit of his health.
Minute. [S.P. Dom., Entry Book 30, f. 85.]

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Oct. 9. 1668
Bonadventure, Ockamness, Chatham
Capt. John Narbrough to Sam. Pepys.

Is waiting for a fair wind, the pilot being unwilling to remove without it.

The guns are nearly out, but vessels are here wanting for that business.

Desires them to give 120 tickets to his purser, Thos. Smith, who has written that they require the captain's hand for them.
[S.P. Dom., Car.II. 247, No. 137.]

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Oct. 9 1668.
[Navy] Treasurer’s Office
R. Waith to the Navy Commissioners.

Received their commands by a woman, with a list of 8 persons' names; she was busy inquiring whether their tickets were paid or not;
his books not being made up, could not answer her till today.

Needed not so sharp a provocation to despatch, as of all people busied with tickets, no one is less subject to indulge corrupt interests than himself.

Gives a list of tickets of 8 seamen, with the amount due to each, &c.
[S.P. Dom., Car.II. 247, No. 138.]

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Oct. 9 1668.
Return by Benj. Boate of 6 calkers who were pressed for the yard at Portsmouth, but have not appeared at the carrier's who was to be at Portsmouth yard on the 15th.
[S.P. Dom., Car.II. 247, No. 139.]

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

Oct. 9 1669.
Navy Office
T. Hayter to Mr. Reynolds.

Pray certify the names of the surgeons put in bills for the Eagle and Roe ketches.

With note by R . Reynolds:
Thos. Stanford removing to the Newcastle at sea,
Thos. Robson's name was put into the bill, but he not at tending,
and John Hoybin coming into the ship, he and Mr. Selby for him received the free gift and imprest;
also that Rob. Stylots, of the Roe ketch, is to receive the money on the bills of
29 November, 1666.
[S.P. Dom., Car.II. 247, No. 140.]

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Oct. 9 1668.
Certificate by J. Wren,
that Nich. Hill, commander of the Spy sloop, has cleared his victualling account,
from 31 May to 20 July 1668,
and was allowed no extra necessary money thereon.
[S.P. Dom., Car.II. 247, No. 141.]

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Oct. 9. 1668
The Harp, Dublin
Capt. Robert Hooper to the Navy Commissioners.

By Sir G. Carteret's order, has had the ship surveyed;
she is found weak and worse than he took her to be;
supposes the survey has come to their hands.

Received their orders to sail to Kinsale, and lay the ship up there, but she is not in a condition to go without repair, and her victuals are expended.
The purser has supplied provisions hitherto, for which he is not yet satisfied, and thereby they are now obstructed.

With note that the book was sent to Lord Brouncker's office the 31st.
[S.P. Dom., Car.II. 247, No. 142.]

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