Wednesday 26 August 1668

Up, and to the office, where all the morning almost, busy about business against the afternoon, and we met a little to sign two or three things at the Board of moment, and thence at noon home to dinner, and so away to White Hall by water. In my way to the Old Swan, finding a great many people gathered together in Cannon Street about a man that was working in the ruins, and the ground did sink under him, and he sunk in, and was forced to be dug out again, but without hurt. Thence to White Hall, and it is strange to say with what speed the people employed do pull down Paul’s steeple, and with what ease: it is said that it, and the choir are to be taken down this year, and another church begun in the room thereof, the next. At White Hall we met at the Treasury chamber, and there before the Lords did debate our draft of the victualling contract with the several bidders for it, which were Sir D. Gawden, Mr. Child and his fellows, and Mr. Dorrington and his, a poor variety in a business of this value. There till after candle-lighting, and so home by coach with Sir D. Gawden, who, by the way, tells me how the City do go on in several things towards the building of the public places, which I am glad to hear; and gives hope that in a few years it will be a glorious place; but we met with several stops and new troubles in the way in the streets, so as makes it bad to travel in the dark now through the City. So I to Mr. Batelier’s by appointment, where I find my wife, and Deb., and Mercer; Mrs. Pierce and her husband, son, and daughter; and Knepp and Harris, and W. Batelier, and his sister Mary, and cozen Gumbleton, a good-humoured, fat young gentleman, son to the jeweller, that dances well; and here danced all night long, with a noble supper; and about two in the morning the table spread again for a noble breakfast beyond all moderation, that put me out of countenance, so much and so good. Mrs. Pierce and her people went home betimes, she being big with child; but Knepp and the rest staid till almost three in the morning, and then broke up. [Continued tomorrow. P.G.]


16 Annotations

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"it is strange to say with what speed the people employed do pull down Paul's steeple, and with what ease: it is said that it, and the choir are to be taken down this year, and another church begun in the room thereof, the next. "

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_St_Paul%27s_Cath…
Scroll down for "Remains of the Cathedral after the fire drawn by Thomas Wyck, c. 1673" ( Was this done from earlier sketches? )

Evidently, from what Pepys writes, the tear-down went quickly at first; then it was slowed by lead calking (see the link). Due to having to get a committee and the Dean approve a design, after two major plan alterations Sir Christopher Wren's church.would begin to be built in 1673 -- and because it was altered in many ways as it was built-- not be concluded until 1716.

Terry Foreman  •  Link

This day's entry gives a vivid sense of what a construction-zone London was at this time.

Chris Squire  •  Link

'There till after candle-lighting . . '

Sunset: 7 pm GMT. No British Summer Time in those days.

Robert Gertz  •  Link

There's a party going on at Batelier's...A celebration to last the remainder of the year. Sam, have some good times and some laughter too, we're gonna party vicariously with you...

Wild London party of the late 60's...Viol on, Sam. Gumbleton get down!

"Really, Gumbleton, get off that noble breakfast table." Gumbleton looks up from table...Ohhhh...

"Wild...Simply...Wild..."

"Ohhh...Am I out of countenance..." Sam groans. "Bess?..."

"Don't...Talk..." puts up hand, holding head. "Just get me a cab home."

"I'm Robin Leech of the London Gazette, here at the posh townhome of London's favorite provider of choice beverages, Mr. Will Batelier, where the night has just been violed away by some of London's brighter celebrites...I see our distinguished Clerk of the Acts and man-about-town, Sam Pepys, with his lovely wife on arm and a bevy of beauties beside him, heading out... Mr. P, a word for our readers on this evening's champagne wishes and caviar dreams?"

"Out of countenance...Going home now...Good night, all...Ohhh...Support your navy...Good night."

"Sam Pepys, staunch advocate of Britain's defense, and his lovely wife, Elisabeth...Dancing the night away here in London..."

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"At White Hall we met at the Treasury chamber, and there before the Lords did debate our draft of the victualling contract with the several bidders for it, which were Sir D. Gawden, Mr. Child and his fellows, and Mr. Dorrington and his, a poor variety in a business of this value."

L&M note the Board was now directed to alter certain details of their draft contract and again meet with the Treasury Commissioners and the merchants named.

"Much ado about nothing," says Pepys to himself, but faintly recalling the play he had seen 6 1/2 years ago. http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/5448/#wiki…

***

Mary  •  Link

"bad to travel in the dark now through the City"

Anyone who recalls the risky nature of picking one's way through heavily blitzed areas of London in the years after WW2 will appreciate this sentiment.

Robert Gertz  •  Link

I note Sam rarely speaks much about James Pierce these days. He once quoted him fairly routinely as to Court gossip but it almost seems as if they avoid each other even at these functions. You'd think with his curiosity on all things, including natural philosophy and Court doings he and James would be spending much time putting heads together.

LKvM  •  Link

Gumbleton

What a great Dickensian name for a "good-humored, fat young gentleman . . . that dances well."

Carl in Boston  •  Link

about two in the morning the table spread again for a noble breakfast beyond all moderation, that put me out of countenance, so much and so good.
I don't see why Sam has any reason for complaint, when Batelier is putting on the spread.
Gumbleton is a great Dickensian name, right up there with Sam Weller.

Background Lurker  •  Link

"that put me out of countenance"

Rather than meaning that he was unhappy with the spread, I think Sam was indicating that he overindulged.

"Sam rarely speaks much about James Pierce these days"

Sam is on jocular terms with HM the King himself and is the DoY's (current) fairhaired boy. What need of Pierce (and his rather unattractive painted wife) for inside information?

Mary  •  Link

"that put me out of countenance"

To put someone out of countenance generally means to cause them to lose face. Pepys regards the provided breakfast as so extraordinarily generous that it makes his own standards of hospitality seem inadequate. He is not complaining, he is confessing to feeling abashed at the thought of the more modest meals that he has offered to members of this same company on other occasions.

pepfie  •  Link

OED I.6.b ... to put out of countenance: to disconcert. Also fig.

...1668 Pepys Diary IV. 11 The table spread‥for a noble breakfast‥that put me out of countenance, so much and so good.

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"Thence to White Hall, and it is strange to say with what speed the people employed do pull down Paul’s steeple, and with what ease: it is said that it, and the choir are to be taken down this year, and another church begun in the room thereof, the next."

L&M: On 25 July 1668 a royal warrant had been issued for the demolition of what remained of the old East end, choir and Tower down to the line of the foundations, on which a temporary choir was to be built: Sir W. Dugdale, Hist. St Paul's (ed. Ellis, 1818), p. 129; J. Lang, Rebuilding St Payls's , p. 41. The building of Wren's church was begin in 1673 and ended in 1716.

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

'Charles II: August 1668', in Calendar of State Papers Domestic: Charles II, 1667-8, ed. Mary Anne Everett Green (London, 1893), pp. 516-565. British History Online http://www.british-history.ac.uk/cal-state-papers…

@@@
Aug. 26. 1668
"Reports of the several members of the Board,
justifying their answer of this date to the letter of
the Commissioners of the Treasury, of 12 June 1668,
touching the charge of the summer's fleet,"
containing abstracts of the following letter:
Treasury Commissioners to the Navy Commissioners.

Request separate accounts to be kept of the moneys employed in setting out
this summer's fleet, including pay of workmen, &c., in the yards,
victuals, wages and stores, that the King may reimburse himself what he has
expended or shall expend, from the moneys which shall come in by this Act.
– 5 May 1668.
@@@

Treasury Commissioners to the Navy Commissioners.

Want a distinct account how much of the 58,500/.
furnished to the Earl of Anglesey in and since March last has been employed
for this year's fleet,
so as to know what money remains due to his Majesty out of the Act, and also how remainder has been disposed of.
– 12 June 1668.

@@@
Navy Commissioners to the Duke of York.

Request an explanation of [what is meant by] the summer's fleet.
– 23 June 1668.

@@@
Navy Commissioners to the Treasury Commissioners.

Have written to the Duke of York for an explanation of the summer's fleet,
and on his reply, will answer their.
– 25 June 1668.

@@@
Duke of York to the Navy Commissioners.

The whole charge for fitting, victualling, manning and keeping abroad the ships set forth, or which were prepared to set forth since 1 Jan. last, is to be borne on the 300,000/. granted to the King by the late Act of Parliament,
except the 11 ships for the winter guard,
the charge of which is to be defrayed out of the 200,000/. appointed for the
ordinary yearly expense of the Navy.
– 25 July 1668.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 245, No. 62.]
---
Enclosing,
List [by Lord Brouncker]
of 62 ships, 8 fire ships, and 11 hired ships in service for 1668,
besides the winter guard and yachts, and of 27 ships of last year,
continued in pay part of this.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 245, No. 62i.]

CONTINUED BELOW

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

Memorandum by Lord Brouncker, to be certified to the Treasury Commissioners,
of the charge of this summer's fleet,
not including the winter guard and yachts,
nor ships to be discharged, amounting to 85,530/. 12s. 6d.

Delivered to the Board 11 Aug. 1668.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 245, No. 62ii.]

Estimate
of the charge of fitting out 26 vessels at Deptford,
17 at Woolwich,
13 at Chatham,
and 29 at Portsmouth,
for this summer's expedition, according to estimates made by the officers of each yard, between 1 Jan. 1668 and 31 July 1668.

Delivered to the Navy Commissioners by the Surveyor's clerk
15 Aug. 1668.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 245, No. 62iii.]

Estimates
of sea and harbour provisions spent by 105 ships named,
between 1 Jan. 1668 and 31 July 1668,
excepting ships of the winter guard and his Majesty's yachts;
amounting to 4,386/. 14s.

Delivered to the Board by Sir Wm. Penn 26 Aug. 1668.
[2 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 245, No. 62iv.]
Aug. 26. 1668

Folding sheet of the above papers, noted
"A copy of the accounts sent to the Committee of Accounts,
in answer to their letter dated 20 July 1668, about moneys due to the King on goods sold, lent, &c.,
to which the Board gave answer in their letter of 26 Aug. 1668."
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 245, No. 63.]

Enclosing,

Account
of the sale of ships named by order of his Royal Highness,
the amount realised by each, and to whom sold,
between 22 Oct. 1667 and 29 July 1668.
[3-½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 245, No. 63i.]

Conditions to be observed in the sales of the King's ships and
stores, which have been made from 1 Sept. 1664 to 31 July 1668.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 245, No. No. 63ii.]

Memorandum
of sums due or owing by or to the Sea Ruyter and Zealand,
and by or to John Lanyon or Thos. Streaton.
[2 pages, S.P. Dom., Car. II. 245, No. 63iii.]

Account by Sir Wm. Penn
of provisions taken in a prize by Sir Rob. Holmes,
and delivered to 6 ships named.
– 18 Aug. 1668.
[3 pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 245, No. 63iv.]

Debtor and creditor account by Sir Wm. Penn,
of provisions delivered to or supplied by Sir Denis Gauden.
[2 sheets. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 245, No. 63v.]

Account by Col. Thos. Middleton
of goods that have been lent out of the King's ships and stores since he has been Surveyor,
with the names of the persons who received the same,
from Dec. 1667 to Aug. 1668.
[Copy. 1-½ pages. S.P. Dom., Car. II. 245, No. 63vi.]

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

Aug. 26. 1668
Billing.
J. W[illiamson] to Rob. Francis.

I am glad to hear from you and Swaddell that there is no great business;
I pray your diligent attendance at the office, and on Lord Arlington.

I will be at home on Monday, if required;
you and Father Patrick will let me know Lord Arlington's mind thereupon.

Thank Mr. Chiffinch for the warrant, but I cannot discreetly use it,
Sir John Robinson having already obliged me not to procure any warrants upon his woods.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 245, No. 66.]
---
Williamson is staying at the Earl of Thurmond’s manor house at Billing, Northamptonshire.

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