Saturday 16 May 1668

Up; and to the Office, where we sat all the morning; and at noon, home with my people to dinner; and thence to the Office all the afternoon, till, my eyes weary, I did go forth by coach to the King’s playhouse, and there saw the best part of “The Sea Voyage,” where Knepp I see do her part of sorrow very well. I afterwards to her house; but she did not come presently home; and there je did kiss her ancilla, which is so mighty belle; and I to my tailor’s, and to buy me a belt for my new suit against to-morrow; and so home, and there to my Office, and afterwards late walking in the garden; and so home to supper, and to bed, after Nell’s cutting of my hair close, the weather being very hot.


8 Annotations

Terry Foreman  •  Link

Ormond to Ossory
Written from: Whitehall
Date: 16 May 1668

The answer to Lord Ossory's letters of 4th and 5th instant is, in short, that the King resolves to keep to himself whatsoever shall hereafter fall to the Crown - at least till he be out of debt. ...

The retrenchment so long spoken of, & so much feared, in Ireland was, it is said, kept back for the writer to advise upon it. It would be reasonable that Ireland should bear its own charge ... whether by raising the revenue to the charge; or by sinking the charge to the revenue ... is matter for consideration. ...

Since writing thus far, Ossory's letter of the 9th came to hand. ... Without the imprest therein mentioned ... the Duke could not have made this voyage, which is as useful to the King, as it can be to private concernments. ...
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Petition for Thomas Deling, agent to Sir William Penn, to the Duke of Ormond
Written from: Dublin
Date: 16 May 1668

Recites the "chequing" of Sir William Penn's pay ... "since the last of March 1667", by the Muster-Master of the Army of Ireland.

Sir W. Penn is employed in his Majesty's service & by his Majesty's command in England. It is therefore prayed that the Cheque aforesaid may be taken off.

[With the Order of the Lord Deputy, Earl of Ossory, thereupon.]

http://www.rsl.ox.ac.uk/dept/scwmss/projects/cart…

Christopher Squire  •  Link

Re: ' . . and there je did kiss her ancilla, . . '

'ancilla'= maid

Gary J. Bivin  •  Link

Re: ’ . . and there je did kiss her ancilla, . . ‘

‘ancilla’= maid

Thanks for the translation. I had all sorts of provocative mental images!

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"saw the best part of “The Sea Voyage,” where Knepp I see do her part of sorrow very well."

L&M note she played Aminta. [The link to the play goes to a readable text.]

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"I to my tailor’s, and to buy me a belt for my new suit "

L&M note fashionable suits were now made up of vest and tunic: http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1666/10/15/#c5357… The shoulder-belt carried a sword, and went out of fashion ca. 1700. The bands were here presumably fastening-cord or 'points', not neck-bands, See Cunnington, Cecil Willett, and Phillis Cunnington. (1963) Handbook of English costume in the seventeenth century. London: Faber., pp. 136, 168. (L&M)

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

The link to Terry's annotation above concerning correspondence with Ormonde has changed. I was also amused by the Acting Lord Lt.'s efforts to get those rambunctious Tories under control (yes, the original use of the name of today's less rambunctious political party!):

https://wayback.archive-it.org/org-467/2019110714…

Ormonde to Ossory
Written from: Whitehall
Date: 16 May 1668
Shelfmark: MS. Carte 48, fol(s). 257
Document type: Copy

The answer to Lord Ossory's letters of 4th and 5th instant is, in short, that the King resolves to keep to himself whatsoever shall hereafter fall to the Crown - at least till he be out of debt. ...

The retrenchment so long spoken of, & so much feared, in Ireland was, it is said, kept back for the writer to advise upon it. It would be reasonable that Ireland should bear its own charge ... whether by raising the revenue to the charge; or by sinking the charge to the revenue ... is matter for consideration. ...

Since writing thus far, Ossory's letter of the 9th came to hand. ... Without the imprest therein mentioned ... the Duke could not have made this voyage, which is as useful to the King, as it can be to private concernments. ...
@@@

Ossory to Donegal
Written from: Dublin Castle
Date: 16 May 1668
Shelfmark: MS. Carte 144, fol(s). 120
Document type: Copy [in Letter Book]

Is informed that "loose and idle persons, commonly called Tories, do usually range up and down the country" ... [county of Antrim, & vicinity thereof] ... under the Earl's government. ... His Lordship is to give express orders to all officers under his command to use their utmost endeavours to apprehend, & bring to justice, all such offenders. ... And the Earl is to report progress of such efforts from time to time.

Ossory writes the same:
to Captain John Pigott, at Maryborough
Shelfmark: MS. Carte 144, fol(s). 120v

to Captain Robert Sandys, at Lanesborough
Shelfmark: MS. Carte 144, fol(s). 120v

to Captain Richard Lowther, at Longford
Shelfmark: MS. Carte 144, fol(s). 120v

to Colonel Thomas Cooke, at Belturbet
Shelfmark: MS. Carte 144, fol(s). 120v
Like directions, for the apprehension of "loose and idle persons, called Tories", to those contained in the letter to Captain Pigott, calendared above.

to Captain Conway Hill, at Hillsborough
Shelfmark: MS. Carte 144, fol(s). 120v
To like effect.

to Sir John Poyntz, at Charlemont
Shelfmark: MS. Carte 144, fol(s). 120v
To like effect.

to Captain John Chichester, at Enniskillen [in MS.: "Inniskillen"]
Shelfmark: MS. Carte 144, fol(s). 120v

to Colonel John Gorges, Governor of Derry
Shelfmark: MS. Carte 144, fol(s). 120v
To like effect, as in the letters, of same date, calendared immediately above.

to Colonel Vere Cromwell [afterwards, Earl of Ardglas], at Downpatrick
Shelfmark: MS. Carte 144, fol(s). 120v
To like effect.

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

to Sir Charles Hamilton, at Cavan
Shelfmark: MS. Carte 144, fol(s). 120v
To like effect.

to Sir George Rawdon, at Coleraine
Shelfmark: MS. Carte 144, fol(s). 120v
To like effect.

to Kingston
Shelfmark: MS. Carte 144, fol(s). 120v
Desires that Lord Kingston, as President of Connaught, will give like orders for apprehension of "loose and idle persons, called Tories", in that province, to those which have been already given, by the Lord Lieutenant, in Ulster, and in some other parts of the Kingdom.
Encloses:
Ossory to Pigott
Written from: Dublin Castle
Date: 16 May 1668
Shelfmark: MS. Carte 144, fol(s). 120
A copy of the letter already calendared above.

@@@

Ossory to Ormonde
Written from: [Dublin]
Date: 16 May 1668
Shelfmark: MS. Carte 220, fol(s). 364
Document type: Holograph

Has heard from Sir Robert Ward that the Duke desires to have a list of the Officers of Munster, with remarks on [the service of] each; which list is accordingly now transmitted.

The writer hears that a general peace is now considered to be certain, but cannot rejoice thereat so much as some others do, from his fear that there may be the inconvenience of war at home.
@@@

That last sentence is ominous ... the Acting Lord Lt. of Ireland, Thomas Butler, 6th Earl of Ossory MP (1623-1680) in the Irish tradition, Baron Butler of Moor Park in the English, must have been very worried about those Tories.

https://wayback.archive-it.org/org-467/2019110714…

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