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Batch has posted 26 annotations/comments since 23 October 2019.

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About Sunday 24 November 1667

Batch  •  Link

Yes, Hewer is a true friend, and an intelligent one, to tell Pepys that his argument won't "hold water" and then convince him to alter his statement. He has certainly moved up from having been one of Pepys' early "boys."

About Thursday 3 October 1667

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"we went with [the coachman] into a nasty end of all St. Giles’s, and there went into a nasty room, a chamber of his, where he hath a wife and child."
"Nasty." That's how the other half lives. Shame on him.

About Monday 2 September 1667

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In the US a (non-imperial) gallon of water weighs 8 pounds. In a gallon there are eight pints, so each one weighs a pound.
One sunny, blazing-hot summer day I weighed myself and then mowed both of my two yards, one large and one medium-large, with an ordinary "push" power mower. It was quite a job.
Then, just out of curiosity, I weighed myself again and was shocked to discover that I had lost three pounds, so I must have sweated out three pints.
How surprising it is to me to find that King Charles II had the same curiosity I had.

About Wednesday 14 August 1667

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Elizabeth is truly an impressive housewife. She not only manages all the laundry (surely several maids/boys must be doing the heavy lifting on her trips to and from the whitster) and supervises the purchasing for the kitchen and the cooking (when she can't ever be certain how many will be there for dinner [lunch]), but she also hires and fires as necessary for the efficient staffing of the household. Pepys scored a prize when he married her.

About Tuesday 16 July 1667

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Many of the people who helped Charles escape after Worcester, like Jane Lane and the Pendrells, received pensions in perpetuity. Jane Lane's lapsed because she was childless, but the Pendrell brothers' pensions are still being paid to a number of their descendants.

About Friday 21 June 1667

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sbt: "Pepys is becoming Nautical - the ladies are consuming 'victuals' and Carteret and Fenn are 'aground'." Pepys is like an armchair quarterback.

About Saturday 15 June 1667

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Compass, verb:
to attain or achieve;
to accomplish;
to contrive;
to plot or scheme:
"to compass a treacherous plan"

About Monday 3 June 1667

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"and one of them, a brisk young fellow, with his hat cocked like a fool behind, as the present fashion among the blades is" -- reminds me of the present fashion among the blades in the US of wearing their baseball caps backwards.
Years back I saw a column by George Will in which he noted that Holden Caulfield already wore his cap this way in "Catcher in the Rye."

About Wednesday 29 May 1667

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So Sam's dearly beloved father is visiting him, and yesterday Elizabeth (his hostess) left Dad to go with Hewer and Jane overnight to Woolwich to gather dew for her complexion, and Sam (his son and host) left him to go meandering through Vauxhall to enjoy the sights and sounds of nightingales and musicians.
And today Dad is ignored again. Elizabeth heads for la Pierce's party wearing an outfit that so incenses Sam (unjustifiably, since he agreed to it) that he stays home in a sulk and works on accounts.
No mention of Dad at all. Strange.

About Monday 13 May 1667

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Pepys saw mirrors used this way in a house he visited a while back and made mention of admiring the effect at that time.

About Sunday 5 May 1667

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". . . to pass the bridge at standing water" -- "slack water" is what the still phase between the tides is called in the US (and "standing water" is a puddle). I wonder if they still call the phase between tides "standing water' in the UK.

About Saturday 27 April 1667

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JWB, thanks for the note about the publication of "Paradise Lost." It's strange to picture these two men, Pepys and Milton, living in the same London and simultaneously toiling away at very different projects that would make them both famous even 350 years later.

About Friday 19 April 1667

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Further in an operatic vein, Sam's remarks about Penn and Wanstead conjure up the home Wagner built in Bayreuth, Wahnfried ("delusion of peace").

About Friday 19 April 1667

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Sam would have absolutely loved Verdi's opera "Macbeth," especially with the sultry Anna Netrebko as Lady Macbeth. My favorite version, however, is the one made at Glyndbourne in 1972 with Josephine Barstow as Lady Macbeth (an Englishwoman herself, she's perfect, especially in the sleepwalking scene, even if she doesn't have the low notes), Kostas Paskalis as a splendidly macho Mediterranean Macbeth, and the young James Morris as Banquo.

About Thursday 11 April 1667

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"he received about 253l. in pieces of eight at a goldsmith’s there hard by, which did puzzle me and him to tell; for I could not tell the difference by sight, only by bigness, and that is not always discernible, between a whole and half-piece and quarterpiece."

"Tell" meaning "count," as in the work of a bank teller -- i.e., it was very hard to CALCULATE the VALUES of the gold pieces because of their odd shapes.