Saturday 11 April 1668

News of Peace. Conning my gamut.


14 Annotations

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"News of peace."

"Lisbonne, Mart. 10. The 4th instant His Excellency the Earl of Sandwich Ambassadour Extraordinary from His Majesty of Great Britaine, with the Marquiss del Carpio, and the Portuguese Commissioners , met in the Convent of St. Elois, wher: they mutually exchanged the Ratification of the Peace between the Two Crowns of Spain and Portugal; and agreed that the 10th of this Month should be appointed for the publication thereof both at Madrid and Lisbonne, and the Ratification dispatch- away by an Express to Madrid.

"This day the Peace was accordingly solem.ly proclaimed here, to the infinite joy and satisfaction of the People-which they intend to demonstrate by three dayes continued Jubile.

"The Prince Regent having been frequently solieited by the Cortes or Parliament, to take upon himself the Title as well as the Authority of King, hat b given them his final answer and resolution never to accept of the Crown during the life of his Brother. -

"His Excellency the Earl Of Sandwich", intends in th ee er four days to depart from hence for Madrid."

http://www.london-gazette.co.uk/issues/251/pages/1

Terry Foreman  •  Link

Stricken-through lines this date prepared by Pepys for transfer to his accompt-book.

gloves 0 - 6 - 6
bacon and anchoves 0 - 13 - 0
Cicero 2 - 10 - 0
coach 0 - 1 - 0
play 0 - 4 - 0
coach home 0 - 2 - 0
letters 0 - 0 - 6

Terry Foreman  •  Link

Arlington to Ormond
Written from: London
Date: 11 April 1668

This day hath brought from France the good news of the concluding [of preliminaries] of peace between the two Crowns [ France and Spain ], "upon the terms offered & excepted, and the suspension of arms till the end of May. There will be yet sufficient time for concluding it formally at Aix [ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_of_Devolution#Tr… ], and getting the ratification from Spain. We, the Mediators, desiring it so much, that Crown must of necessity consent to it; and by this means my Lord of Ossory is not like to be a Colonel". ...

On Monday, the Adventurers' petition comes again before the House of Commons. ... Mrs Dempsey is very busy to introduce a petition, at the same time, against the writer. And this day the Parliament fell heavily upon my Lord of Sandwich. ...

http://www.rsl.ox.ac.uk/dept/scwmss/projects/cart…

Christopher Squire  •  Link

‘gamut n. Etym:  Contraction of medieval Latin gamma ut; < gamma n. . .
 1. The first or lowest note in the mediæval scale of music, answering to the modern G on the lowest line of the bass stave. Obs. exc. Hist.
. . 1597    T. Morley Plaine & Easie Introd. Musicke 4   The first note standeth in Gam-vt.
. . 1677    R. Plot Nat. Hist. Oxford-shire 12   [An Echo]‥which answers to no Note so clearly as to Gamut.

2. The ‘Great Scale’ (of which the invention is ascribed to Guido d'Arezzo), comprising the seven hexachords or partial scales, and consisting of all the recognized notes used in mediæval music. It extended from Γ ut (= G on the lowest line of the bass stave) to E-la (= E in the highest space of the treble). Obs. exc. Hist.
1654    J. Playford Breefe Introd. Skill Musick 3   The Gam-ut is drawne upon foureteene Rules, and their Spaces, which comprehend all Notes or sounds usual in Musicke.
. . 1825    J. F. Danneley Encycl. Music at Gamme,   This gamut comprised in all, twenty notes, viz. from G, first line bass clef, to the sixth of its double octave, or to the fourth space E, treble clef.

3. a. Hence in later use: The whole series of notes that are recognized by musicians. Sometimes also used for: The major diatonic scale, or the ‘scale’ recognized by any particular people, or at any period.

4. transf. and fig. The whole scale, range, or compass of a thing.’ [OED]

Robert Gertz  •  Link

Meanwhile, in Brampton...

"Captain Ferrers...So good of you to call..."

"Mrs.Pepys...You have brought light into our wretched darkness..." beam, kiss of extended hand. "Mr. Pepys, how are you? And you, Mrs. Jackson, let me offer my heartiest congratulations on your marriage."

Pall nervously beaming, smoothing dress, eyeing John Sr's harsh stare.

T'ain't fittin'...John's narrow stare at Bess.

T'ain't fittin'...Grim look at Ferrers.

Knock at door...

"Ah, Mrs. Pepys...How good to find you here..." eager young voice.

"Lord Hinchingbroke, what a joy." beaming smile, hand extended. Pall mentally attempting to copy the manner of hand extension, awaiting miyounglord's greeting...

'ere, I am, waitin'...The new bride...She begins to quietly fume as Hinchingbroke hangs on to Bess' hand.

Door slam as John leaves room...

Terry Foreman  •  Link

I wonder, who are the gloves for? and what was the play?

JWB  •  Link

I wonder, what were the bacon & anchovies for? and did he carry them with him at the play? Too bad qualtities not given so that we could get some idea of the relative prices.

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"Cicero 2--26--)"

L&M: All copies of Cicero in the PL are of editions later than 1668.

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

From the in-coming mail:

April 11. 1668
Capt. John Perriman to [the Navy Commissioners].
Summoned several masters of ketches and hoys, and took up the Hopewell at Greenwich and others named, and ordered the masters to attend their Honours;
but they have neglected, and several have refused and abused him.

Has taken up 2 vessels; wants better encouragement.

Mr. Mares has goods for Portsmouth, and wants the Golden Hand, that lies doing nothing at Chatham, for the work.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 238, No. 77.]

###

April 11. 1668
Harwich.
Capt. Ant. Deane to the Navy Commissioners.
I cleaned the muster boat and fitted her with guns, powder, and shot;
she went out with a small crew of 6 seamen and 6 soldiers, but got 13 able seamen, taking 1 out of each vessel;

I demanded 2 of Capt. Jackson of Ipswich, now gone for Norway, who, seeing me so weakly manned, called his men, and bid them take up their handspikes and resist the power, which they soon did, and would have spoiled the gunner and men, if they had not left them, although he showed the Duke's commission.

I thought good to let your Honours know this affront against his Royal Highness's power, so that the captain may answer it on his return from Norway.
I am going our again to see if any more men can be had.

The men you ordered down have not appeared;
the pressed men will rebel and get away, as my only support lies in some soldiers who watch night and day.

Pray despatch the ketch and men, and order 94l to Wm. Hewer, and I shall charge a bill on him, and discharge all these men the day the ship departs.

I hope you allow the victuals for the men pressed, though your order only specifies 80.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 238, No. 78.]

###

April 11. 1668
Rochester.
Certificate by Chris. Wade, mayor of Rochester,
that Thomas Bond, boatswain of the Royal Katherine,
has made complaint of a smith living at Eastgate Bridge,
about iron belonging to that ship. and he brought 2 persons named, to take oath that the smith confessed that he bought it.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 238, No. 79.]

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

And in Rome, the Pope must be rubbing his hands:

In the register of the House of Novices of the Jesuits at Rome there is the following entry:
"Jacobus de la Cloche ingressus 11 Aprilis 1668."

From another list, which is signed by the novice himself, we learn that he came from the island of Jersey, and was a subject of the King of England; that his age was about 24; and that he presented himself for admission in the dress of an ecclesiastic, with scarcely any luggage but the clothes he wore.

This youth, whose name never again appears in the books of the Order, and has never been acknowledged by history, was the eldest of the sons of Charles II, the older brother of the Duke of Monmouth, and destined to be -- for a moment -- his rival in the fanciful schemes of his father.

So well was the secret of Jacobus de la Cloche’s birth preserved that throughout the long intrigue to save the Protestant succession, and to supplant the Duke of York by the son of Lucy Walters, the public never knew there was another who, by his age and by his mother’s rank, had a better claim than the popular favorite, and who voluntarily renounced the dazzling fortunes which were legitimately within his grasp.

The obscurity which Jacobus de la Cloche preferred has endured ..., and even now is not entirely dispelled; but the facts add an interesting episode to the checkered history of the Stuarts, and clarify Charles II’s attachment to the Catholic Church.

This attachment, which excited the curiosity of the world and influenced many of the actions during Charles II’s reign, has been admitted with greater unanimity by recent historians than by those who wrote from personal experience, and whom Charles succeeded in partially misleading.
“It was not,” says the ablest of the statesmen who approached him, “the least skillful part of his concealing himself to make the world think he leaned towards an indifference in religion.”1

[1 ] The Home and Foreign Review, July 1862.
[1 ] Halifax, Character of Charles II., p. 11.
[1 ] Clarendon, History of the Rebellion, x. 8.

https://oll.libertyfund.org/title/laurence-histor…

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

And in Ireland ...

Arlington to Ormonde
Written from: London
Date: 11 April 1668
Shelfmark: MS. Carte 46, fol(s). 624-625
Document type: Holograph

This day hath brought from France the good news of the concluding [of preliminaries] of peace between the two Crowns, "upon the terms offered & excepted, and the suspension of arms till the end of May. There will be yet sufficient time for concluding it formally at Aix, and getting the ratification from Spain. We, the Mediators, desiring it so much, that Crown must of necessity consent to it; and by this means my Lord of Ossory is not like to be a Colonel". ...

On Monday, the Adventurers' petition comes again before the House of Commons. ...
Mrs. Dempsey is very busy to introduce a petition, at the same time, against the writer.
And this day the Parliament fell heavily upon my Lord of Sandwich. ...

@@@

Petition of Roger Chamberlaine to the Duke of Ormonde
Written from: Dublin
Date: 11 April 1668
Shelfmark: MS. Carte 154, fol(s). 163v
Document type: Copies

Plaint of debt against Lieutenant John Price. [With the Order thereupon.]

@@@

[John Walsh] to Ormonde
Date: 11 April 1668
Shelfmark: MS. Carte 215, fol(s). 429-430
Document type: Holograph

Reports the condition of the forts, ammunition, & stores at Duncannon. The writer is fully "resolved to see this summer's service abroad", and therefore requests the Duke to grant him furlough and pass for three years. He was "never more weary of any of his prisons", than he is now of Ireland. ...

@@@

Warrant, by the Duke of Ormonde, Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, for the repair of Oliver St. George, Vice-Admiral of Connaught, into England
Written from: [Dublin]
Date: [11 April] 1668
Shelfmark: MS. Carte 36, fol(s). 281
Document type: Copy

Warrant, by the Duke of Ormonde, Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, for the repair of Oliver St. George, Vice-Admiral of Connaught, into England there to attend his Majesty's Privy-Council in relation to his proceedings in condemning as lawful prize the frigate Sacrifice of Abraham.

@@@

Like Warrants, addressed to Colonel John Spencer; to John Stepney esquire, and to Lewis Des Mynieres, merchant
Written from: [Dublin]
Date: [11 April] 1668
Shelfmark: MS. Carte 36, fol(s). 281
Document type: Breviates

https://wayback.archive-it.org/org-467/2019110714…

Stephane Chenard  •  Link

Possessed by a wandering Japanese spirit, or having mistaken a rare edition of long-lost master Matsuo Shishiro for a Cicero, Sam today wrote a very fine haiku:

平和のニュース
音楽を学ぶ

(Heiwa no nyūsu/ongaku o manabu, "peace news/learn music", the closest that Google Translate comes to the pure Pepys original, alas losing a bit of the cadence along the way. The OED clarifies that "conning" is, "Archaic: learning by heart", something master Shishiro would have approved too).

And, maybe he is having a Very Special Week in Bess' absence. The man buys gloves on his way to the theater, pays double fare on the way back. Hmmmm. Did he dismiss the servants and cook a romantic supper? His secret personal recipe, bacon sautéed with anchovies. One more memory he may not have wanted to write up a couple days later.

RSGII  •  Link

Conning is also the nautical term for directing the steering of a ship. “I have the Conn” is the Naval command that you are in charge of directing all others in steering the ship, i.e. the helmsman. So “conning my gamut” could mean that in response to peace, he is rethinking all his options.

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