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LKvM has posted 176 annotations/comments since 5 November 2015.

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Third Reading

About Sunday 29 April 1660

LKvM  •  Link

Etymology of Jean-Paul Buquet's Fr. chirurgien, surgeon:
From Latin chirurgus (“surgeon”),
from Ancient Greek χειρουργός (cheirourgós, “surgeon”),
from χείρ (cheír, “hand”) + ἔργον (érgon, “work”).
A surgeon does manual work on a patient.

About Sunday 29 April 1660

LKvM  •  Link

Etymology of Jean-Paul Buquet's Fr. chirurgien, surgeon
From Latin chirurgus (“surgeon”),
from Ancient Greek χειρουργός (cheirourgós, “surgeon”),
from χείρ (cheír, “hand”) + ἔργον (érgon, “work”).
A surgeon does manual work on a patient.

About Friday 27 April 1660

LKvM  •  Link

For a glimpse into what it all was really like for these jacks and other staunch men and passengers, Byron's poem (noted above) 150 years later:
But, since life at most a jest is,
As philosophers allow,
Still to laugh by far the best is,
Then laugh on—as I do now.
9th
Laugh at all things,
Great and small things,
Sick or well, at sea or shore;
While we’re quaffing,
Let’s have laughing—
Who the devil cares for more?

About Saturday 21 April 1660

LKvM  •  Link

I live on the coasts of Mississippi and Louisiana (USA) and am horrified at the thought of pickled oysters.

About Friday 6 April 1660

LKvM  •  Link

Nice description of the quarterdeck by Rick Ansell. It might be appropriate here to note that the ride on a ship is much, MUCH smoother the farther aft one is. That's why Nelson and his ilk had their cabins way aft, under the quarterdeck. (On sailboats, the berths under the cockpit are called quarterberths.)
Re the rough ride at the bow end of a ship, see Richard Henry Dana's biographical novel *Two Years Before the Mast* about his 1834 two-year trip around Cape Horn as a low-ranking seaman who bunked in the plunging, uncomfortable area "before the mast," i.e., forward between the bow and the mast.
Also, I would like to know more about Balty's reason for showing up uninvited, not to mention his status as a Reformado and why it troubled Sam. Was Balty an embarrassment?

About Tuesday 3 April 1660

LKvM  •  Link

JudyB asked
"Are they at anchor?"
Yes, they are at anchor a little below Gravesend.

About Monday 26 March 1660

LKvM  •  Link

From Sandwich's (My Lord's) journal:
“26th. Monday. We fell down over against Northfleete.”
(Thank you, Jeannine.)
They had been anchored in Creekmouth by Barking. On this day Montagu apparently took advantage of wind blowing southeast to "fall down" (to sail easily downwind, as opposed to "beating" upwind) on Northfleet, positioning himself nearer to Gravesend and the channel.
On Google Maps there is a large indentation at Northfleet (which is actually on the south side of the Thames). Its predecessor in Sam's day have been a quasi-bay where Sam's ship is safely anchored now.
I just wonder why Sam didn't mention that the ship had been moved. I guess he was too much wrapped up in his anniversary of having survived "being cut for the stone."

About Friday 23 March 1659/60

LKvM  •  Link

Alter Kacker,
When he stands under the outstretched arms of an unusually tall woman who was in London as a celebrity, it is mentioned that he was 5'1".

About Tuesday 13 March 1659/60

LKvM  •  Link

Re Samuel's relationship to "my lord" --

As has been mentioned before, I think, Sam's great-aunt Paulina Pepys married Edward Montagu's ("my lord's) father, Sydney Montagu.
Sam was therefore "my lord" Edward Montagu's first cousin once removed.
Considering what short lives people had in those times, first cousin once removed is not really a terribly remote relationship.
They were cousins.

About Tuesday 6 March 1659/60

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"Overton at Hull do stand out, but can, it is thought, do nothing; and Lawson, it is said, is gone with some ships thither, but all that is nothing."

Overton stood out (sailed) from Hull to an unspecified location, and Lawson and other ships congregated there with Overton (where he had presumably anchored?) to comprise a little fleet.
It seems an orchestrated naval plan, but apparently, according to Sam, carried out to no purpose.

About Friday 24 February 1659/60

LKvM  •  Link

Regarding Bored's discussion of visibility at the time of Sam's early departure, he says that at that hour it was already light, but Sam was not "in sunshine." Bored uses the term "morning Nautical Twilight" for this interim condition.
In German it is the Morgendämmerung, or "morning twilight," and although I've been sailing for sixty years, I never knew until now that there was a British English equivalent, "morning Nautical Twilight," for this important period of the day for sailors.
In the States we just call it "first light," and when cruising that's when we get going.

About Saturday 11 February 1659/60

LKvM  •  Link

Grahamt:
"The same distinction in second person pronouns exists in modern French and German with tu/vous and du/sie."
The informal second person plural in German is "ihr," not "sie," which means either "she" or "they."*
To become the formal second person plural "you," "sie" must be capitalized, i.e., "Sie," and it is this "Sie" that is the formal German counterpart of Fr. second person plural "vous."
In English we now use "you" (the old second person plural) as both the second person singular AND the second person plural. The only other second person plural forms that I know of in English nowadays are "y'all" in the American South and "youse" in some Italian-immigrant neighborhoods (in movies and on TV, at any rate).
* Re German "sie," "Sie," and "ihr," to make matters even more confusing, "ihr" is not only the informal second person plural, but also "her."

About Tuesday 7 February 1659/60

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Re Rodney Fox:
"The City of London is probably about 5 miles from were Sam hung out. Whitehall, The Strand, Fleet St.,Ludgate hill, St. Pauls, and Cannon St to Mansion House,which is the seat of the Lord Mayor."
I've walked all of that, and it didn't seem like 5 miles at all, so I checked Google Maps. Walking from the center of Westminster ("where Sam hung out") to the Temple (to see brother John's apposition) is 1.1 miles, and from there on into the City of London is a total of only 2.6 miles.

About Sunday 5 February 1659/60

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Re tithes as expected Church of England income and Admiral Lord Nelson's daughter Horatia Nelson Ward, Mrs. Philip Ward:
"Philip Ward’s financial resources were quite limited [and] he was obliged . . . to embark on litigation [re] tithes which were an important part of his income. Horatia had an extremely strong and lively personality, and she, rather than her husband, took a major part in [the] legal negotiations [in London]. . . . The complex and lengthy law-suit lasted for 10 years and was only settled in 1842. [She] lost the suit . . . ."

About Monday 30 January 1659/60

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"... and so pretending to meet Mr. Shott ...”

Wouldn't this use of "pretending" mean that Sam was "claiming" to meet Mr. Shott, i.e., it was a ruse? After all, the "Old Pretender," the son of the deposed King James II, was so called because he "pretended" or "claimed" to be the rightful King of England. And his son, Bonnie Prince Charlie, was likewise the "Young Pretender," who also "claimed" to be the rightful King of England.

About Wednesday 18 January 1659/60

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Regarding Pepys's playgoing and Shakespeare's plays, Pepys liked "Macbeth" a lot and saw it several times. He also was "mightily pleased" with "Hamlet." In fact, it was Pepys's comments about "Hamlet," often quoted elsewhere, that led me to his diary.