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LKvM has posted 140 annotations/comments since 5 November 2015.

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Second Reading

About Wednesday 30 December 1668

LKvM  •  Link

I come from the American "Deep South" (Mississippi), which was mostly settled by people from the British Isles. My name is Dutch, and I was surprised to discover (thanks to Ancestry) that I'm 55% Scottish, 33% English, 5% Irish, only 4% Dutch, and 3% Welsh.
Down here we have the expression " I didn't know him from Adam's all fox," meaning "I didn't know him at all."
It never made any sense whatsoever, but everyone knew what it meant, so making sense didn't matter. It turns out that "Adam's all fox" is a corruption of "Adam's off ox," i.e., the right-side ox of Adam's pair of oxen.
(Adam's near ox has no fame at all.)

About Monday 21 December 1668

LKvM  •  Link

Such a great entry! I can see it all in my mind's eye.
I do wish he had said more about "Macbeth," my favorite play and opera, but it sounds as if there were rivals enough in the audience for Lady Macbeth's vehemence.

About Friday 18 December 1668

LKvM  •  Link

"and so by hackney coach to Brooke House . . . . " Coach-owner Sam had to hop a common hackney. Had Elizabeth commandeered the coach to track Deb?
Liked the ubi Hewer poem, but Hewer would have been in big trouble if he had "stayed at home behind me and was fast asleep in bed."

About Friday 4 December 1668

LKvM  •  Link

"I fear that Sam's physical fitness will decline, now that he's riding instead of walking."
AnnieC, I also wondered if that might happen, but because of his daily schedule it probably won't.
I feel sure Sam was very fit, not only because he walked a lot, but also because he lived on what we today would call an "intermittent fasting" regimen.
He still had, perhaps, a "morning draught" (something we haven't heard of since the early years of the diary) but no food in the morning.
Then he breaks his fast by "dining" around noon and "supping" around 6:00pm.
That means he doesn't eat from 6:00pm one day until 12:00pm the next day, resulting in a "fast" of eighteen hours, which is the intermittent fasting routine that I and many others have adopted to lose weight, and I believe it would have kept him trim too, whether he walked or rode in his coach.

About Monday 23 November 1668

LKvM  •  Link

"That he do think that the Duke of Buckingham hath a mind rather to overthrow all the kingdom, and bring in a Commonwealth, wherein he may think to be General of their Army, or to make himself King, which, he believes, he may be led to, by some advice he hath had with conjurors, which he do affect."
Shades of "Macbeth." Sam has seen it and liked it, so maybe Buckingham has too.

About Tuesday 10 November 1668

LKvM  •  Link

IMHO, Elizabeth is caught up in misdirected anger. The person she is really mad at is herself, because she could have had flings with Lord Sandwich, or the dashing Captain Ferrers, or maybe young Lord Hinchinbroke, and probably countless others, because of her beauty, but didn't.
Over the years her consequent resentment has so eaten away at her that now, with it brought to a head by the Deb incident, she shall "never sleep more" and raves like Lady Macbeth.

About Saturday 7 November 1668

LKvM  •  Link

"Does anyone have any insight as to why our hero never became Sir Sam?"
Kelvin:
It was suggested somewhere (I can't recall where) that he probably wouldn't have wanted that honor because of the expense (or "charge," in his era's usage).
I think he should be awarded a knighthood posthumously.

About Tuesday 27 October 1668

LKvM  •  Link

"Was Samuel a typical man of his time and status or was he a rake?"
I believe he was typical precisely BECAUSE he was a rake.
But not all men were. For example, his contemporary Isaac Newton died a virgin.

About Sunday 20 September 1668

LKvM  •  Link

In case I'm not the only one who wondered about "turner," it's someone who forms articles on a lathe, and "turnery" consists of those articles, of which there are many on a ship, such as belaying pins, and Mrs. Turner's husband's occupational surname indicates he had a turner long ago in his family tree.

About Wednesday 16 September 1668

LKvM  •  Link

"Work took more than 200 years . . . ."
I'm surprised it didn't take longer than that. The book "Sarum" is a good read about how long it took to build a cathedral, and "Secrets of the Castle" on Amazon Prime Videos shows what went into construction in early times.
Sad to hear about poor Fancy.

About Sunday 13 September 1668

LKvM  •  Link

JWB on 14 Sep 2011:
"Less than honorable behavior by Duke of York."
Mary on 14 Sep 2011:
"Politics and honour don't necessarily go together."
Me: They hardly ever do.

James the DoY obviously trusts and relies on Sam completely. In view of the fact that Sam sees this handover of material mainly as a way to protect himself, James is an innocent.

About Friday 11 September 1668

LKvM  •  Link

Samuel Pepys, ghost writer to the Duke of York, is required to reply to the duke's "great letter" which he (Sam) has written. It sounds like a plot line in a novel.

About Friday 28 August 1668

LKvM  •  Link

James Duke of York strikes me as a very conscientious and serious person, in contrast to his lax and lazy older brother, King Charles II, who is a slacker.
The pair remind me a bit of Prince of Wales Charles, the next king, who talks to plants, and his redoubtable and tireless younger sister the Princess Royal Anne, who is staunch like Prince Philip and has been described as the only child of Queen Elizabeth II who has "the right stuff" to be the next monarch.

About Friday 21 August 1668

LKvM  •  Link

Last night I watched a movie on Amazon that might interest Pepysians as a sort of prequel to the diary: "Cromwell" (1970, 2 hrs 19 mins).
Richard Harris is riveting as Oliver Cromwell, and Alec Guinness makes a wonderfully weak and mild-mannered King Charles I, with a very brief glimpse also of the young Charles II.
I had always heard of the "English civil war"; I never realized that there were actually THREE of them: the First Civil War, the Second Civil War, and the third Civil War, all crammed into about a decade.
The initial preparations for warfare against the king call to mind that the teenaged Edward Montagu, later the first Earl of Sandwich and "my lord" to Sam, rode through the countryside to round up local farmers and such to become soldiers.
Interesting scenes in Parliament make clear the reasons for the people's charge of treason against the king, who had attempted to ally foreign powers (Ireland and France) to fight against his subjects, the English.
The depiction of the execution of Charles I also calls up images of Sam's schoolboy attendance at the event. (One almost looks for him in the crowd.)
Some of the characters in the movie are the regicides who are hunted down in the early days of the diary and hanged, drawn, and quartered.
It was also a surprise to me that after the war was over, Cromwell, who had been offered the crown but refused it, waited six years before cirruption and anarchy led him to become the Lord Protector, and he was Lord Protector for only five years before his death.
It is all a very substantial preparation for the diary, and well worth watching.

About Roll Call. Say hello!

LKvM  •  Link

Greetings to all from retirement in the NOLA French Quarter. LKvM here, as Linda Kay van Marjenhoff, which is the older version of my name, Linda Kay Hoff. I have also commented occasionally as Batch, in memory of my husband, Jimmy Batchelor.
I have a Ph.D. in German literature (Northwestern Univ., 1980), but in my study of German I noted a certain 19th-century German obsession with Hamlet's indecision that blended with my abiding interest in all things Shakespearean and caused me to write a new historicism treatment of *Hamlet* called *Hamlet's Choice*.
It may have been a note referring to Sam's opinion of *Hamlet* that led me to discover this blog in about 2008. I followed it daily from then until October 2011, when I stopped because my husband committed suicide.
I didn't take the diary up again until its second iteration began, when I finally read the diary's exciting beginning, then re-read all through the middle, and now, in August 2021, am approaching the end for the first time.
It has been a delight. I second the motions to have Sam posthumously knighted and to have Phil knighted as well. Thank you, Phil and all the annotators, for a wonderful trip!
Linda: lindakayhoff@gmail.com

About Tuesday 28 July 1668

LKvM  •  Link

"The company being but little" -- the king, the DoY, Lady Castelmaine and her ilk were not there.
Sam goes to the theater not to be seen, but to see.

About Monday 27 July 1668

LKvM  •  Link

Re women walking alone, Elizabeth was angry at Sam and walked away alone at the beginning of the diary, when they were still living in Axe Yard.
The assumed guilt of a woman caught alone with a man is clear in "Vanity Fair" when Becky Sharp is surprised by the piano alone with a man: "I am innocent!" she says instantly.
Also, even today, it "trouble[s] me, to see the confidence of the vice of the age." You're right on, Sam.

About Monday 20 July 1668

LKvM  •  Link

The widowed Queen Victoria's Scottish ghillie and favorite, John Brown, died of erysipelas two days after he contracted it.