Annotations and comments

Scube has posted 19 annotations/comments since 14 September 2015.

The most recent first…

Comments

About Friday 13 September 1667

Scube  •  Link

"It vexed me to hear how Sir W. Pen, who come alone from London, being to send his coachman for his wife and daughter, and bidding his coachman in much anger to go for them (he being vexed, like a rogue, to do anything to please his wife), his coachman Tom was heard to say a pox, or God rot her, can she walk hither? These words do so mad me that I could find in my heart to give him or my Lady notice of them."
I read this a bit differently. It sounds like Sir W. has lost his temper at his wife, being angry that the coach must be sent back to pick her up. It may be that the coachman is defending the wife here, despite the "god rot her." If it way too far to walk, his question may be to make the point that of course he needs to go back for her.
BTW, as a late comer to this site, I am frequently impressed and always grateful for all of the insights back in 2010 (as well as the fewer but no less excellent observations on the second time around.

About Sunday 2 June 1667

Scube  •  Link

What a wonderful entry. Much work done. No skirt chasing. Interesting as others point out, that there appears to be no great expectation of keeping sabbath and no consequence for failing to do so. I wonder what his accounts look like. Are they ledgers? Are there any adopted accounting conventions or rules?

About Wednesday 22 May 1667

Scube  •  Link

I too am curious about the "lifts up the whites of his eyes" comment. Any insight?

About Saturday 18 May 1667

Scube  •  Link

Do any of you more knowledgeable folks have a sense of how many servants Sam and Bess keep at any one time, and what their respective roles and duties are?

About Friday 26 April 1667

Scube  •  Link

This is one of the longer entries we have seen in a while. Wonder what the longest entry is. Be fun to rank them by length. As to Pepys intentions on others reading his diary, he probably wrote it initially for himself, then as men often do in later years, decided to preserve it for posterity.

About Tuesday 23 April 1667

Scube  •  Link

We so rarely hear of Bess visiting her mother or where she lives or her financial condition. Wonder if that is because Bess doesn't visit her often, or perhaps so often that it is unremarkable.

About Saturday 6 April 1667

Scube  •  Link

"up and down, to pay all my scores occasioned by this mourning for my mother; and emptied a 50l. bag, " Wonder what the 50l was for? Appears to be all related to mourning. As SDS points out, doesn't appear that he went to a funeral. Would have been interesting to learn a bit more about his custom there.

About Tuesday 5 March 1666/67

Scube  •  Link

Spot on SDS - I think you summed up what Sam is thinking. But on his immoral carrying ons. I am still not clear how much Bess knows, cares, or accepts, and whether this simply was accepted (at least by the men) back then.

About Mustapha (Roger Boyle, Earl of Orrery)

Scube  •  Link

Interesting that in 1665, our critic Mr. Pepys found the play not good, but two years later in his January 5, 1667 entry, he declared Mustapha "a most excellent play for words and design as ever I did see." He admitted to seeing but not remembering the play from the last go round. Guess it was much improved!

About Wednesday 3 October 1666

Scube  •  Link

Good point Martin. Was backgammon played in England at that time? Interesting to see that Sam has formed an alliance with Penn on the privateer. Seems that aligns their interest against Batten.

About Friday 13 July 1666

Scube  •  Link

SDSarah - thanks for that observation! Remain in suspense on how the next round with the Dutch will turn out.

About Saturday 7 April 1666

Scube  •  Link

Yes! Wholeheartedly agree with Colin. San Diego Sarah, please carry on. Enjoy (and am enlightened by) your observations.

About Saturday 13 September 1662

Scube  •  Link

Does anyone know if Sam loses his access to the leads? The suspense is killing me, but I don't want to read ahead.