Annotations and comments

Mary K has posted 1,141 annotations/comments since 9 March 2007.

9 Dec 2007, 6:16 p.m. - Mary K

'and it raining hard' No wonder Aunt Wight is out of humour. If her fine clothes are made of silk, plush or velvet the chances are that they have 'spotted' badly in the rain. The plush or velvet will have to be carefully steamed and brushed to bring it back into good condition and the silk will need careful sponging and pressing. Moreover, there are likely to be mud-stains (or worse) from the dirty streets. In an age when most people expected their clothes to do service for many years, this sort of running maintenance was a time-consuming business.

8 Dec 2007, 8:03 a.m. - Mary K

"my boy and I to music" We've heard no more of that diagnosis of 'the stone' for the lad. Perhaps it was just a touch of colic?

6 Dec 2007, 5:09 p.m. - Mary K

Sorry for repetition; glitch somewhere.

6 Dec 2007, 5:08 p.m. - Mary K

Mrs. The Sam not infrequently abbreviates the daughter, Theophila's, name in this way. The 'Mrs.' is purely a courtesy title, indicating that the girl is not a mere wench, but more important than that. It does not necessarily have anything to do with age or marital status in a context such as this.

6 Dec 2007, 3:31 p.m. - Mary K

Mrs. The Sam not infrequently abbreviates the daughter, Theophila's, name in this way. The 'Mrs.' is purely a courtesy title, indicating that the girl is not a mere wench, but more important than that. It does not necessarily have anything to do with age or marital status in a context such as this.

3 Dec 2007, 4:06 p.m. - Mary K

"commissioners for the sick and wounded took over the Savoy hotel" (Pedro's quote above). The old Savoy Palace had long been used as a hospital for wounded members of the military. It was not a hotel!

1 Dec 2007, 4:56 p.m. - Mary K

"this time of mixing monies and confusion" Oh dear, oh dear. Dangerous waters ahead for our friend, if he's not careful.

27 Nov 2007, 7:50 a.m. - Mary K

"can't be all that sad, Sam" Eh? Being big with child doesn't necessarily contribute to the happiness of the family. Nor does it necessarily imply that the family was happy several months ago when the child was conceived. Sad, here, may indeed mean 'unhappy, dreary, distressed etc.' In earlier entries Sam has expressed the opinion that Mrs. Lane's marriage is proving far from contented, at least as far as she is concerned.

24 Nov 2007, 9:47 p.m. - Mary K

Mea culpa. Apologies to all. Just shows that you shouldn't rush to annotate just before dashing off to catch a train.

23 Nov 2007, 9:54 p.m. - Mary K

Peg Penn This Peg Penn is surely Margaret Penn, the daughter of Marie and John Jasper of Ballycase, County Clare. She married, firstly, Nicasius van der Schuren and then, after his death, William Penn (knighted 1660) in 1643. L&M Companion does not give her date of birth, but notes that she died in Walthamstow in 1672. Notable Quaker, William Penn, was her eldest son, born 1644,

16 Nov 2007, 7:15 a.m. - Mary K

"hard looks and sooth" L&M amend this reading to - 'hard looks and sithes' sithes=sighs.

14 Nov 2007, 8:25 a.m. - Mary K

"getting ..... without book" i.e. learning it by heart.

1 Nov 2007, 7:19 a.m. - Mary K

Poor Bess. Sam no doubt expects the housekeeping money to be accounted for down to the last penny. Unless Elizabeth is to keep minutely detailed accounts of every deal that she makes in the markets day by day, this is going to be very difficult for her - not least because many deals will have involved a process of chaffering and bargain-making. Stall-holders are unlikely to give out written receipts.

30 Oct 2007, 7:45 a.m. - Mary K

The Dutch fleet remains in The Straights. According to an L&M footnote, this was a false rumour. de Ruyter was actually en route to Guinea.

30 Oct 2007, 7:43 a.m. - Mary K

A barrel of oysters for late supper? Not sure that my digestive system would welcome this. Let's hope that our man manages to sleep well tonight.

21 Oct 2007, 7:43 a.m. - Mary K

two silver tumblers I'm willing to bet that these were comparatively unadorned and so represent relatively greater intrinsic value than the magnificent flagons that were valued yesterday.

16 Oct 2007, 3:03 p.m. - Mary K

ORA The 'grotto' interpretation is very attractive. Grottos had become fashionable in Italy during the 17th century and the fashion had spread to France by the middle of the century. Perhaps Montagu was making a landscape fashion-statement. Various websites mention the extensive works that were done at Hinchingbroke in Edward's time, but I can find no details of any landscape projects.

12 Oct 2007, 6:57 a.m. - Mary K

the taking of Gigery. L&M give some interesting information here. At Jijelli the French were trying to establish a base that would act as a counterbalance to Tangier and sent a force of 8000 men in 63 vessels (including one battalion of English troops!) to take the fort. The attack was successful not least because the defenders had already withdrawn from the place before the fleet arrived. SPOILER: however, they will be back in October and drive the French occupiers out again.

10 Oct 2007, 6:40 a.m. - Mary K

Just looking? Well, no. Strictly speaking he's stalking the woman. And why should he want to know where she lives if he has not at least half a mind to 'bump into her in the street' at some point in the future?

8 Oct 2007, 6:20 a.m. - Mary K

Mr. Cocker's 'globe' There was speculation on this article in the entry for August 10th 1664. Some variation on the 'shoemaker's window' now sounds even more likely, since we have reference to a globe. I too see the frame of oiled paper as something separate from the globe itself.