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Louise Hudson has posted 441 annotations/comments since 9 November 2013.

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About Wednesday 21 November 1666

Louise Hudson  •  Link

“Here was Betty Michell with her mother. I would have carried her home, but her father intends to go with her, so I lost my hopes. . . . and after supper an hour reading to my wife and brother something in Chaucer with great pleasure, and so to bed.”

What, pray tell, would he have done with Betty Mitchell if he had been able to “carry her home” without her father going with her? His wife was home (he writes that she was home in the evening and he didn’t say she’d been out earlier). Would he have suggested a Ménage à Troi? And what about her brother? For all his supposed management abilities, Sam doesn’t seem to think ahead very well.

About Monday 29 October 1666

Louise Hudson  •  Link

“Sam today answers the question we were tossing around back when he bought the guineas. He bought 2,000 of them and paid the discount as a surcharge.“

Many thanks Paul Chapin for mentioning guineas. I couldn’t for the life of me figure out what ginnys were.

About Thursday 20 September 1666

Louise Hudson  •  Link

“. . . but am mightily troubled for my great books that I miss, and I am troubled the more for fear there should be more missing than what I find, though by the room they take on the shelves I do not find any reason to think it.“

It’s strange that Sam, with his proclivity for paperwork, hadn’t kept a catalog of all his books, especially since he’s so attached to them. If he had, he wouldn’t have had to wonder if any were missing.

About Friday 7 September 1666

Louise Hudson  •  Link

CGS wondered if Sam’s “drawers” were like today’s Boxers.

You won’t see men today wearing anything like the voluminous drawers worn in the 1600s. No elastic, either.

“Underneath their shirt or tunic they clothed their legs in braies or breeches. Braies were a loose fitting drawer-like garment which was attached at the waist with a drawstring and varied in length from upper-thigh to below the knee.”

See photos and more text here. http://www.fashionintime.org/history-mens-underga…

From what I hear, they were laundered once a year, whether they needed it or not.