6 Annotations

Phil  •  Link

Toilet, latrine, etc.

Cumgranissalis  •  Link

A popular ref. to the privy be jakes, a term used by the betters centuries later.
"...stretching W to a jakes standing there. The viewers say that above the same jakes, the party [sic] ought to have 8 ft. 8 in. E and W and 2 ft. N and S for the fall of his jakes in a vault lying there between the parties as it was at the time of his purchase....."
more for the enquiring mind.
From: 'Misc. MSS Box 91 [C]: 1550-51 (nos 267-316)', London viewers and their certificates, 1508-1558: Certificates of the sworn viewers of the City of London (1989), pp. 104-18. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.asp?compi…. Date accessed: 11 August 2005.

cgs  •  Link

lifted from the OED
1652 in Rec. Early Hist. Boston (1877) II. 109 It is ordered that noe house of Office..shall stand within twentie foot of any high way.

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

The Guardian has an article today on -- well, you read it -- but the part that caught my interest was this:

"The recorded history of human defecation can be read as a series of attempts at differentiation: how do we separate our excrement from our bodies, our sewage from our homes and cities? How do we keep the sounds and smells of our bodily functions from infesting other people’s senses? How do we enforce social hierarchies by dividing the bodies of the powerful from the bodies of the oppressed?

"To these questions, the bathroom with its seated water closet, or flush toilet, was a surprisingly recent but remarkably potent answer. Although sit-down privies and latrines have existed at least since Egyptian antiquity, for almost all of history the vast majority of Homo sapiens defecated squatting, in the open. As the planet filled up and humans clustered together in cities over the second half of the previous millennium, open defecation became a scourge, leading to rising rates of diseases such as dysentery – still a major problem in parts of the world without modern sanitation.

"It’s generally held that the water closet was invented by an English nobleman at the end of the 16th century. But it wasn’t until the industrialisation of Britain’s potteries and ironworks in the mid-19th century that water closets ceased to be the preserve of the wealthy. As they spread to homes across northern Europe, toilets led to revolutions in sanitation, medicine, social relations and even psychology.

"With more and more people going to the bathroom at home and in private, defecation became a solitary and almost unspeakably vulgar act. Some wrongly believe that other people’s bowel movements elicit universal disgust. But as recently as the 16th century, a treatise on etiquette scolded well-to-do Europeans not to flaunt the stinking cloth with which one wipes one’s arse. For several hundred years, into the 18th century, English monarchs did their business in front of literal privy councils while enthroned upon an upholstered box containing a chamber pot. Indeed, “social defecation” has been observed across times and cultures. In the 1970s, the anthropologist Philippe Descola documented it among the previously uncontacted Achuar people in the Amazon; open-plan, ni-hao (“hello”) bathrooms are still common in many parts of China."

https://www.theguardian.com/news/2018/nov/30/bowe…

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

It's well documented that Louis XIV built Versailles with no bathroom facilities. However, I just found out that in the Parisian code of laws, called the “Costume de Paris,” in 1513, it is expressly ordered, that every house should have a privy. More severe punishments for failure to obey were added in 1533. In 1538 the under officers of police were required to inspect houses and to report the names of those who had not complied with the regulation.

I suspect this means that there had to be a room in the house, but if there were no sewers, what good is the room? The chamber pot needs to be emptied, regardless of where it is kept.

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References

Chart showing the number of references in each month of the diary’s entries.

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1668