Wednesday 17 February 1668/69

Up, and with W. Hewer with me to Lincoln’s Inn, by appointment, to have spoke with Mr. Pedley about Mr. Goldsborough’s business and Mr. Weaver’s, but he was gone out, and so I with Mr. Castle, the son-in-law of Weaver, to White Hall to look for him, but did not find him, but here I did meet with several and talked, and do hear only that the King dining yesterday at the Dutch Embassador’s, after dinner they drank, and were pretty merry; and, among the rest of the King’s company, there was that worthy fellow my lord of Rochester, and Tom Killigrew, whose mirth and raillery offended the former so much, that he did give Tom Killigrew a box on the ear in the King’s presence, which do much give offence to the people here at Court, to see how cheap the King makes himself, and the more, for that the King hath not only passed by the thing, and pardoned it to Rochester already, but this very morning the King did publickly walk up and down, and Rochester I saw with him as free as ever, to the King’s everlasting shame, to have so idle a rogue his companion. How Tom Killigrew takes it, I do not hear. I do also this day hear that my Lord Privy Seale do accept to go Lieutenant into Ireland; but whether it be true or no, I cannot tell. So calling at my shoemaker’s, and paying him to this day, I home to dinner, and in the afternoon to Colonel Middleton’s house, to the burial of his wife, where we are all invited, and much more company, and had each of us a ring: and so towards evening to our church, where there was a sermon preached by Mills, and so home. At church there was my Lord Brouncker and Mrs. Williams in our pew, the first time they were ever there or that I knew that either of them would go to church. At home comes Castle to me, to desire me to go to Mr. Pedly, this night, he being to go out of town to-morrow morning, which I, therefore, did, by hackney-coach, first going to White Hall to meet with Sir W. Coventry, but missed him. But here I had a pleasant rencontre of a lady in mourning, that, by the little light I had, seemed handsome. I passing by her, I did observe she looked back again and again upon me, I suffering her to go before, and it being now duske. I observed she went into the little passage towards the Privy Water-Gate, and I followed, but missed her; but coming back again, I observed she returned, and went to go out of the Court. I followed her, and took occasion, in the new passage now built, where the walke is to be, to take her by the hand, to lead her through, which she willingly accepted, and I led her to the Great Gate, and there left her, she telling me, of her own accord, that she was going as far as, Charing Cross; but my boy was at the gate, and so je durst not go out con her, which vexed me, and my mind (God forgive me) did run apres her toute that night, though I have reason to thank God, and so I do now, that I was not tempted to go further. So to Lincoln’s Inn, where to Mr. Pedly, with whom I spoke, and did my business presently: and I find him a man of very good language, and mighty civil, and I believe very upright: and so home, where W. Batelier was, and supped with us, and I did reckon this night what I owed him; and I do find that the things my wife, of her own head, hath taken (together with my own, which comes not to above 5l.), comes to above 22l.. But it is the last, and so I am the better contented; and they are things that are not trifles, but clothes, gloves, shoes, hoods, &c. So after supper, to bed.

10 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"to have spoke with Mr. Pedley about Mr. Goldsborough’s business and Mr. Weaver’s"

L&M note this was about Pepys's Brampton property. Pedley was a lawyer who handled several matters of this kind for him.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Rochester, Killigrew and the King

L&M note Lord Sandwich's Journal says that Killigrew had railed at Rochester for keeping his wife in the country; Rochester, forbidden the court, went off to France.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"I do also this day hear that my Lord Privy Seale do accept to go Lieutenant into Ireland; but whether it be true or no, I cannot tell."

This time the rumor is true: 14 February Lord Robartes had accepted the appointment while remaining Lord Privy-Seal and will be formally appointed Lord-Lieutenant of Ireland May 3. (L&M)

Robert Gertz   Link to this

I'd guess a dollop of guilt over his encounter with the woman in black helped eased Sam's annoyance with the French goods Bess purchased.

***
Tom Killigrew has taken a whack or two at Charles...I wonder if his pardon of Lord Rochester had something to do with that.

Dorothy Willis   Link to this

Today's little adventure with the pretty woman in mourning shows Sam still needs his "keeper." Or maybe a leash. And as for the things Bess bought, she surely needs them more than Sam needs another picture of the King of France!

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"in the afternoon to Colonel Middleton’s house, to the burial of his wife, where we are all invited, and much more company"

Would the body of the late Mrs. Middleton have been on view, as in what is called a "lying in"? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lying_in_repose

Mary   Link to this

Mrs. Middleton's funeral.

I haven't been able to find any references to the practice of "lying in repose" in 17th century England.

NB "lying-in" (without the 'repose') is different. That is what women do during and after childbirth. There used to be specifically named lying-in hospitals. In unfortunate cases lying-in may, of course, eventually lead to lying in repose.

languagehat   Link to this

"among the rest of the King’s company, there was that worthy fellow my lord of Rochester, and Tom Killigrew, whose mirth and raillery offended the former so much, that he did give Tom Killigrew a box on the ear in the King’s presence"

It's pretty funny that Rochester, of all people, would be offended by somebody else's mirth and raillery!

Australian Susan   Link to this

Sometimes, Sam you are a complete and utter prat

Andrew Hamilton   Link to this

"worthy fellow"-- nice touch of sarcasm.

Lying-in: reminds me of that rather indelicate undergraduate song, "Every day is labor day at the Boston Lying-in."

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