Monday 11 January 1668/69

Up, and with W. Hewer, my guard, to White Hall, where no Committee of Tangier met, so up and down the House talking with this and that man, and so home, calling at the New Exchange for a book or two to send to Mr. Shepley and thence home, and thence to the ‘Change, and there did a little business, and so walked home to dinner, and then abroad with my wife to the King’s playhouse, and there saw “The Joviall Crew,” but ill acted to what it was heretofore, in Clun’s time, and when Lacy could dance. Thence to the New Exchange, to buy some things; and, among others, my wife did give me my pair of gloves, which, by contract, she is to give me in her 30l. a-year. Here Mrs. Smith tells us of the great murder thereabouts, on Saturday last, of one Captain Bumbridge, by one Symons, both of her acquaintance; and hectors that were at play, and in drink: the former is killed, and is kinsman to my Lord of Ormond, which made him speak of it with so much passion, as I overheard him this morning, but could not make anything of it till now, but would they would kill more of them. So home; and there at home all the evening; and made Tom to prick down some little conceits and notions of mine, in musique, which do mightily encourage me to spend some more thoughts about it; for I fancy, upon good reason, that I am in the right way of unfolding the mystery of this matter, better than ever yet.

18 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"in Clun's time, and when Lacy could dance. "

4 August 1664: "Clun, one of their best actors, was, the last night, going out of towne (after he had acted the Alchymist, wherein was one of his best parts that he acts) to his country-house, set upon and murdered "
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1664/08/04/

L&M note Lacy was ill this day.

Chris Squire   Link to this

‘Hector, n. Etym: < Latin Hectōr , Greek Ἕκτωρ , son of Priam and Hecuba, husband of Andromache, ‘the prop or stay of Troy’; in origin, as adj. ἕκτωρ = holding fast, . .
2. (Now usu. with lower-case initial.) A swaggering fellow; a swash-buckler; a braggart, blusterer, bully. Frequent in the second half of the 17th c.; applied spec. to a set of disorderly young men who infested the streets of London.
1655 Sir E. Nicholas in N. Papers (Camden) II. 256 The Earle of Anglesie and his two Hectors upon Sunday morning last fought a duell with Collonel Dillan‥and two Irishe Captains‥His Lordships Hectors had no hurt, and ye Irishe came of untoucht.
. . 1693 N. Luttrell Diary in Brief Hist. Relation State Affairs (1857) III. 2 On Sunday night last 3 hectors came out of a tavern in Holborn, with their swords drawn, and began to break windows . . ‘ [OED]

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...my guard..." ? Sounds like Sam is getting restive under the benevolent dictatorship of Elisabeth St.Michel Pepys.

Mary   Link to this

"the pair of gloves which, by contract...."

So, there were undertakings on both sides.

john   Link to this

"and made Tom to prick down some little conceits and notions of mine, in musique"

Lovely that he seeks the guidance of his betters who are not his elders.

languagehat   Link to this

"and there saw “The Joviall Crew,” but ill acted to what it was heretofore, in Clun’s time, and when Lacy could dance."

Sam's becoming a curmudgeon!

Dorothy   Link to this

Several online sources say giving gloves was often part of sealing a bargain. I think the gloves were part of their agreement about the allowance, emphasizing it was a serious contract.

Todd Bernhardt   Link to this

re: "my guard"

Funny how Sam tends to insert phrases like this in the Diary after he's had a fight with Elizabeth (see yesterday) and is (presumably) feeling the weight of her yoke a bit more...

Michael L   Link to this

Robert: I also thought at first that "my guard" was an ironic comment on feeling imprisoned. Is it possible that it might mean that Will is a bodyguard of sorts? It may be that with all the wealth Pepys is flaunting, he feels the need for personal security in public. Is there any other reason to think this?

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Gloves

They served as wedding and funeral tokens for favored friends, were a sign of gentility and status or rank.

In Tudor times gloves were substituted by "Glove Money."
"A bribe, a perquisite; so called from the ancient custom of presenting a pair of gloves to a person who undertook a cause for you. Mrs. Croaker presented Sir Thomas More, the Lord Chancellor, with a pair of gloves lined with forty pounds in “angels,” as a “token.” Sir Thomas kept the gloves, but returned the lining." http://www.bartleby.com/81/7266.html

Glove money
"A tip or gratuity to servants, professedly to buy gloves with.
"(Eng. Law.) A reward given to officers of courts; also, a fee given by the sheriff of a county to the clerk of assize and judge's officers, when there are no offenders to be executed." http://www.thefreedictionary.com/Glove+money

Here are some other ways that gloves -- the very hands themselves -- served as items of value, http://books.google.com/books?id=RdUNAAAAQAAJ&p...

Mary   Link to this

gloves as gifts.

There is still a tradition (though I suspect not much observed these days) that if gloves are given as a gift, then the receiver should give a small coin to the giver in return.

A similar tradition applies to the giving of a knife or scissors.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"made Tom to prick down some little conceits and notions of mine, in musique, which do mightily encourage me to spend some more thoughts about it; for I fancy, upon good reason, that I am in the right way of unfolding the mystery of this matter, better than ever yet. "

This is a vision Pepys has pursued for over a year.

See 20 March 1667/68: "at my chamber all the evening pricking down some things, and trying some conclusions upon my viall, in order to the inventing a better theory of musique than hath yet been abroad; and I think verily I shall do it "
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1668/03/20/ and 10 December 1667: "Here met Mr. Hinxton, the organist, walking, and I walked with him; and, asking him many questions, I do find...that it is only want of an ingenious man that is master in musique, to bring musique to a certainty, and ease in composition." http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1667/12/10/

Australian Susan   Link to this

Mary - in our household, if you gave someone a handbag or purse, you always had to put a silver coin in it.

Paul Chapin   Link to this

In mid-20th century America, at least in some places such as New York City, a small bribe to an official or a policeman was referred to as "giving (someone) a hat", on the basis that the amount involved,$25, was about the cost of a hat. There are references to this in detective novels from the period. Same sort of usage as the glove money Terry cites.

Todd Bernhardt   Link to this

"Is it possible that it might mean that Will is a bodyguard of sorts?"

Michael L, based on the past several months, I think that if Will is playing the role of bodyguard, it's only on Elizabeth's bidding, to prevent other women from touching -- or, more precisely, being touched by -- Sam's body.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"the great murder thereabouts, on Saturday last, of one Captain Bumbridge, by one Symons"

L&M note the murder had been committed in the Bear on Drury Lane http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/12175/ Symonds (who served in the Queen Mother's household) fled abroad with his two accessories. The victim had served in the Spanish army and was visited on his death-bed by the Spanish ambassador.

Jim   Link to this

Captain Francis Bromwich had been in street battles prior to the one that claimed his life.

In 1662 Bromwich received a pardon from Charles II for his participation in a fatal brawl. This is the site that lists the pardon > >
http://books.google.com/books?id=YB4XAQAAMAAJ&p...

William Hepworth Dixon recounts, in the 4th volume of his book “Her Majasty’s Tower”, another fatal fight, this one in 1665, in which Captain Bromwich was involved. The story can be found at this site > >
http://books.google.com/books?id=B40LAAAAYAAJ&p...

pepfie   Link to this

"W. Hewer, my guard" "who goes up and down with me like a jaylour"

Regarding self-esteem, feeling guarded would be a lighter yoke than feeling jailed.
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1668/11/20/
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1668/11/23/

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