Thursday 26 November 1668

Up, and at the Office all the morning, where I was to have delivered the Duke of York’s letter of advice to the Board, in answer to our several answers to his great letter; but Lord Brouncker not being there, and doubtful to deliver it before the new Treasurers, I forbore it to next sitting. So home at noon to dinner, where I find Mr. Pierce and his wife but I was forced to shew very little pleasure in her being there because of my vow to my wife; and therefore was glad of a very bad occasion for my being really troubled, which is, at W. Hewer’s losing of a tally of 1000l., which I sent him this day to receive of the Commissioners of Excise. So that though I hope at the worst I shall be able to get another, yet I made use of this to get away as soon as I had dined, and therefore out with him to the Excise Office to make a stop of its payment, and so away to the coachmaker’s and several other places, and so away home, and there to my business at the office, and thence home, and there my wife to read to me, and W. Hewer to set some matters of accounts right at my chamber, to bed.

5 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

The Royal Society today at Arundel House — from the Hooke Folio Online

Nou. 26. Mr. [John] Lock[e] [ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Locke ] admitted.

The Expt. Deuised & made this Day by the Curator, was the impelling of wooden balls both against springy & not Springy bodys, wherby he did intend to evince that the Reflectio of Bodys Depends vpon the springnesse of bodys. soe that where there is noe spring there can be noe Reflection. But the expt. mode being not Satisfactory to the Company for the purpose Declared, the Curator proposd another to be made at the next meeting vizt. with a mettaline String made more or Lesse tense to see what the Return or Reflex of it will be, according to its seuerall degrees of tension. Dr Croon suggested tht it might be considerd whether the businesse of motion might not be made out without taking in the notion of springynesse of Bodys.

Mr. Old: produced a paper of Dr. Wallis written by him Nou. 15. 1668. in Oxford concerning the Generall Laws of motion. it was orderd to be registred with thanks to the author -- [ http://www.archive.org/details/philtrans01712567 ]

about Examining testicles. - -

it was also agreed vpon that on Saturday next at mr Hookes Lodging in Gresham colledge the Persons of the Comtee for anatomicall Expts. would meet to make a Cut in the kidney of a Dog to see if it would heal vp again.

Colpresse Letter about Red & Opall glasse. -

http://webapps.qmul.ac.uk/cell/Hooke/hooke_foli...

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"the Curator [ Mr. Hooke ] proposd another to be made at the next meeting vizt. with a mettaline String made more or Lesse tense to see what the Return or Reflex of it will be, according to its seuerall degrees of tension. Dr Croon suggested tht it might be considerd whether the businesse of motion might not be made out without taking in the notion of springynesse of Bodys. "

There seems to be a backlash against Hooke's concern with "springynesse."

Chris Squire   Link to this

‘tally, n.1 Etym: . . Latin tālea , cutting, rod, stick . .
. . 1.b. Such a cloven rod, as the official receipt formerly given by the Exchequer for a tax, tallage, etc. paid, or in acknowledgement of a loan to the sovereign.
. . 1697 J. Pollexfen Disc. Trade & Coyn 70 When any Tax or Imposition is granted by Parliament, Tallies, Exchequer Notes or Bills, issued out upon the same, for the supplying of the Government with Ready Money till the Duties be paid.’ [OED]

It was in modern terms a post-dated cheque on the Government, made out to Cash, so anyone who found it in the street could take it to the Exchequer and turn it into gold.

GrahamT   Link to this

Re: There seems to be a backlash against Hooke’s concern with “springynesse.”

Luckily the 'springyness' deniers were defeated and we have Hooke's law and not Croon's.

languagehat   Link to this

"a very bad occasion for my being really troubled, which is, at W. Hewer’s losing of a tally of 1000l., which I sent him this day to receive of the Commissioners of Excise."

Man, that could have been a very serious problem indeed. It's an impressive tribute to their friendship that it survived this potentially disastrous blunder.

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