Saturday 31 October 1668

Up, and at the office all the morning. At noon home to dinner with my people, and afternoon to the office again, and then to my chamber with Gibson to do more about my great answer for the Duke of York, and so at night after supper to bed well pleased with my advance thereon. This day my Lord Anglesey was at the Office, and do seem to make nothing of this business of his suspension, resolving to bring it into the Council, where he seems not to doubt to have right, he standing upon his defence and patent, and hath put in his caveats to the several Offices: so, as soon as the King comes back again, which will be on Tuesday next, he will bring it into the Council. So ends this month with some quiet to my mind, though not perfect, after the greatest falling out with my poor wife, and through my folly with the girl, that ever I had, and I have reason to be sorry and ashamed of it, and more to be troubled for the poor girl’s sake, whom I fear I shall by this means prove the ruin of, though I shall think myself concerned both to love and be a friend to her. This day Roger Pepys and his son Talbot, newly come to town, come and dined with me, and mighty glad I am to see them.

6 Annotations

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"Pepys?"

"Your Grace...What an honor for you to come to us here at the office..."

"Right..." closes closet door, pulls out Great Reply. "Pepys, about this reply of yours..."

"Your Grace?"

"'I know I can never hope to atone in your heart for the sorrow I have caused...But, my devotion to us and you remains unyielding, and the love I bear in my heart towards you...'" Folds letter...

Ummn...

Ooops...Never should have had Gibson do both letters.

"Pepys? I don't know what to say...None under me...Except perhaps in heat of battle...Has ever addressed such tender devotion and care to me..."

Uh...

"I can only say it's truly from the heart, your Grace." brightly.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"This day my Lord Anglesey was at the Office, and do seem to make nothing of this business of his suspension, resolving to bring it into the Council, where he seems not to doubt to have right, he standing upon his defence and patent, and hath put in his caveats to the several Offices: so, as soon as the King comes back again, which will be on Tuesday next, he will bring it into the Council."

I dunno Anglesey...As Fearless Leader once said "Laws are for the honest people." But good luck...

Of course if everyone on the Council has also received a rather large token of your esteem...Luck may not be necessary.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Arlington to Ossory
Written from: London
Date: 31 October 1668

The present post will carry to Lord Ossory the news of the suspension of Lord Anglesey "from the execution of his place of Treasurer of the Navy, and of the giving it to Sir Thomas Littleton, & Sir Thomas Osborne".

Lords Orrery and Berkeley are desirous to prevail on the King to keep the Duke of Ormond in England, and to appoint Lords Justices for Ireland; a proposition which the Duke dislikes. There has been much talk of the thing, and it may take effect; but, as yet, no resolution has been arrived at.
_____

Ormond to Ossory
Written from: Hampton Court
Date: 31 October 1668

... What has befallen Lord Anglesey renders it the more difficult to separate the writer & his place, without some reflection upon him; which, he hopes, is considered & will be avoided. ...

Notices some matters of military service; a question arising concerning the extent of Lord Orrery's commission as Governor of the Castle of Limerick; and a report which has reached the writer of the existence of a Jesuit school at Kilkenny, over against that founded by himself. ...

http://www.rsl.ox.ac.uk/dept/scwmss/projects/ca...

Andrew Hamilton   Link to this

What has befallen Lord Anglesey renders it the more difficult to separate the writer & his place, without some reflection upon him; which, he hopes, is considered & will be avoided. …

Would anyone care to elucidate? I assume "the writer" is Ormond and he is referring to the plot to deny him power in Ireland ("his place") and hopes the King will consider the proposal a slight to himself, Ormond, and will therefore avoid it.

Probably time for a walk along the Thames in the manner of Edmund Spenser (Prothalamion) "whom sullein care,
Through discontent of my long fruitlesse stay
In Princes Court, and expectation vayne
Of idle hopes, which still doe fly away,
Like empty shaddowes, did afflict my brayne."

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Anglesey and Ormond

The Anglesey link above to a Wikipedia article helps explain: "His public career was marked by great independence and fidelity to principle. On 24 July 1663 he alone signed a protest against the bill "for the encouragement of trade", on the plea that owing to the free export of coin and bullion allowed by the act, and to the importation of foreign commodities being greater than the export of home goods, "it must necessarily follow ... that our silver will also be carried away into foreign parts and all trade fail for want of money."[2] He especially disapproved of another clause in the same bill forbidding the importation of Irish cattle into England, a mischievous measure promoted by the Duke of Buckingham, and he opposed again the bill brought in with that object in January 1667. This same year his naval accounts were subjected to an examination in consequence of his indignant refusal to take part in the attack upon Ormonde;[3] and he was suspended from his office in 1668, no charge, however, against him being substantiated." http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/887/

Don't cross Buckingham.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

NB: The attacks on Ormond and Anglesey are attacks on the Duke of York.

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