Wednesday 8 January 1667/68

Up, and it being dirty, I by coach (which I was forced to go to the change for) to White Hall, and there did deliver the Duke of York a memorial for the Council about the case of Tangiers want of money; and I was called in there and my paper was read. I did not think fit to say much, but left them to make what use they pleased of my paper; and so went out and waited without all the morning, and at noon hear that there is something ordered towards our help, and so I away by coach home, taking up Mr. Prin at the Court-gate, it raining, and setting him down at the Temple: and by the way did ask him about the manner of holding of Parliaments, and whether the number of Knights and Burgesses were always the same? And he says that the latter were not; but that, for aught he can find, they were sent up at the discretion, at first, of the Sheriffes, to whom the writs are sent, to send up generally the Burgesses and citizens of their county: and he do find that heretofore the Parliament-men being paid by the country, several burroughs have complained of the Sheriffes putting them to the charge of sending up Burgesses; which is a very extraordinary thing to me, that knew not this, but thought that the number had been known, and always the same. Thence home to the office, and so with my Lord Brouncker and his mistress, Williams, to Captain Cocke’s to dinner, where was Temple and Mr. Porter, and a very good dinner, and merry. Thence with Lord Brouncker to White Hall to the Commissioners of the Treasury at their sending for us to discourse about the paying of tickets, and so away, and I by coach to the ‘Change, and there took up my wife and Mercer and the girl by agreement, and so home, and there with Mercer to teach her more of “It is decreed,” and to sing other songs and talk all the evening, and so after supper I to even my journall since Saturday last, and so to bed. Yesterday Mr. Gibson, upon his discovering by my discourse to him that I had a willingness, or rather desire, to have him stay with me, than go, as he designed, on Sir W. Warren’s account, to sea, he resolved to let go the design and wait his fortune with me, though I laboured hard to make him understand the uncertainty of my condition or service, but however he will hazard it, which I take mighty kindly of him, though troubled lest he may come to be a loser by it, but it will not be for want of my telling him what he was to think on and expect. However, I am well pleased with it, with regard to myself, who find him mighty understanding and acquainted with all things in the Navy, that I should, if I continue in the Navy, make great use of him.


6 Annotations

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"he do find that heretofore the Parliament-men being paid by the country, several burroughs have complained of the Sheriffes putting them to the charge of sending up Burgesses; which is a very extraordinary thing to me, that knew not this"

From the earliest days of the English parliament it had been an accepted premise that the representatives of the shires and boroughs of England should not have to attend at their own expense, but should be paid wages by the communities that [they represented].

In 1951 R.C. Latham commented that a definite history of the payment of parliamentary wages in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries could only be compiled "by the massed attack of some Wedgwood Committee of the future" (R.C. Latham, "Payment of Parliamentary Wages—the Last Phase" http://ehr.oxfordjournals.org/content/LXVI/CCLV... )

-- Parliamentary History, Vol. 26, pt. 3 (2007), pp. 281?300 "The Payment of Members of Parliament in the Fifteenth Century" Hannes Kleineke http://muse.jhu.edu/login?uri=/journals/parliam...

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"Up, and it being dirty, I by coach (which I was forced to go to the change for) to White Hall"

Evidently (unsurprisingly) the Royal Exchange had a hack-stand.

Robert Gertz  •  Link

Sam as considerate and thoughtful employer with an appreciation for talent, very nice.

I see Abigail's stock has fallen with Sam this week.

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"did ask him about the manner of holding of Parliaments, and whether the number of Knights and Burgesses were always the same? "

Number of Westminster MPs
Over the history of the House of Commons, the number of members of parliament (MPs) has varied for assorted reasons, with increases in recent years due to increases in the population of the United Kingdom.

In the 16th century there were around 310 members of parliament, including representation at various points from Calais and Wales.
In 1654 the First Protectorate Parliament included elected representation from Scotland and Ireland. After the Third Protectorate Parliament in 1659 the Scottish and Irish members disappeared from Westminster until the unions of 1707 and 1801 respectively.
In 1654 England and Wales saw its first systematic redistribution of parliamentary seats ever. However, in 1659 the representation of England and Wales reverted to the pre-Civil War pattern. When the Rump Parliament was recalled, later the same year, and the full Long Parliament was reinstated the following year its composition was exactly the same as before the Protectorate.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Number_of_Westmin...

Terry Foreman  •  Link

William Prynne, note L&M, was a lawyer and antiquarian; M.P. for Bath; author of what was then the primary book on the history of parliamentary elections, the Brief Register, Kalendar and Survey of the several Kinds, Forms of all Parliamentary VVrits (1659-64) :
The first part of a brief register, kalendar and survey of the several kinds, forms of all parliamentary vvrits comprising in 3. sections, all writs ... illustrated with choice, usefull annotations ... / by William Prynne ...
Prynne, William, 1600-1669.
London: Printed for the author, and sold by Edward Thomas ... and Henry Brome ..., 1659
Early English Books Online [full text]
http://quod.lib.umich.edu/e/eebo/A56164.0001.00...

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