Saturday 9 March 1666/67

Up, and to the office, where sat all the morning busy. At noon home to dinner, where Mrs. Pierce did continue with us and her boy (who I still find every day more and more witty beyond his age), and did dine with us, and by and by comes in her husband and a brother-in-law of his, a parson, one of the tallest biggest men that ever I saw in my life. So to the office, where a meeting extraordinary about settling the number and wages of my Lord Bruncker’s clerks for his new work upon the Treasurer’s accounts, but this did put us upon running into the business of yesterday about Carcasse, wherein I perceive he is most dissatisfied with me, and I am not sorry for it, having all the world but him of my side therein, for it will let him know another time that he is not to expect our submitting to him in every thing, as I think he did heretofore expect. He did speak many severe words to me, and I returned as many to him, so that I do think there cannot for a great while, be, any right peace between us, and I care not a fart for it; but however, I must look about me and mind my business, for I perceive by his threats and enquiries he is and will endeavour to find out something against me or mine. Breaking up here somewhat brokenly I home, and carried Mrs. Pierce and wife to the New Exchange, and there did give her and myself a pair of gloves, and then set her down at home, and so back again straight home and thereto do business, and then to Sir W. Batten’s, where [Sir] W. Pen and others, and mighty merry, only I have got a great cold, and the scolding this day at the office with my Lord Bruncker hath made it worse, that I am not able to speak. But, Lord! to see how kind Sir W. Batten and his Lady are to me upon this business of my standing by [Sir] W. Batten against Carcasse, and I am glad of it. Captain Cocke, who was here to-night, did tell us that he is certain that yesterday a proclamation was voted at the Council, touching the proclaiming of my Lord Duke of Buckingham a traytor, and that it will be out on Monday. So home late, and drank some buttered ale, and so to bed and to sleep. This cold did most certainly come by my staying a little too long bare- legged yesterday morning when I rose while I looked out fresh socks and thread stockings, yesterday’s having in the night, lying near the window, been covered with snow within the window, which made me I durst not put them on.

13 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Brodrick [ http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/9461/ ] to Ormond
Written from: London
Date: 9 March 1667

The Dutch make greater naval preparations than ever. ... From the Caribbee Islands nothing, very lately, is heard, but there is a belief that all are lost except the Barbadoes, which will be able to repel the invaders, if the ammunition arrive before they attack the place. ...

http://www.bodley.ox.ac.uk/dept/scwmss/projects...

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"I perceive [ my Lord Brouncker ] is most dissatisfied with me, and I am not sorry for it, having all the world but him of my side therein, for it will let him know another time that he is not to expect our submitting to him in every thing, as I think he did heretofore expect."

William 2nd Viscount Brouncker is indeed used to being very much in charge.

"He did speak many severe words to me, and I returned as many to him, so that I do think there cannot for a great while, be, any right peace between us, and I care not a fart for it"

A phrase to revive.

"but however, I must look about me and mind my business, for I perceive by his threats and enquiries he is and will endeavour to find out something against me or mine."

Semper vigilo.

cape henry   Link to this

"...a great cold, and the scolding this day at the office with my Lord Bruncker hath made it worse." This appears to have been a toe-to-toe verbal brawl of the first order, with Pepys resorting to *high* words in the Diary. One gets the feeling that Pepys thinks that he won decisively, but understands that a Duke can be a powerful adversary right or wrong. I wonder how much effect this row had on the *mighty* merriment with Sirs WB and WP, and how much of it he might have recounted word for word to the gathering?

mary mcintyre   Link to this

OK, I'll bite... what's the difference between socks and stockings (the looking out for same being Sam's excuse for catching cold).

C.J.Darby   Link to this

It's no wonder Sam is getting cold feet after his dispute with Lord Bruncker.

Bradford   Link to this

"looked out fresh socks and thread stockings, yesterday’s having in the night, lying near the window, been covered with snow within the window":

Yes, if one's immune system has been emotionally compromised due to office politics, sleeping in a room where the snow can drift in won't improve your health much.

GrahamT   Link to this

Re: "difference between socks and stockings "
socks short (below the knee) stockings long (over the knee)
Nowadys, men wear socks, women wear (nylon) stockings (and socks)
As Sam wore knee-breeches, he would wear stockings to keep his calves and knees warm and socks as extra warmth for his feet.
I see many be-skirted women on the commute doing exactly the same in this cold weather.

A. De Araujo   Link to this

"and I care not a fart for it"
nowadays"I don't give a f..."

Susan Scott   Link to this

More about socks vs. stockings:

In the middle ages, socks were low, leather foot coverings, more like slippers today. By Sam's time, they had evolved into knitted versions, tending to be low-cut on the foot and made from wool for warmth.

Stockings, on the other hand, were worn by both genders, and were long, over the top of the knee. Personal preference dictated whether you tied your garters over the knee or under it. By this time most stockings were commercially knitted on a knitting frame, and Sam was probably buying his at the Exchange on one those shopping junkets with his wife. Ladies and gentlemen wore silk, lesser folk thicker cotton thread, and lower classes wore wool. All colors were worn at this time, with most gentleman going for darker shades.

As status-conscience as Sam is, he's almost certainly wearing silk stockings when he goes to court. The silk stockings are thin and elegant, but not warm. Here he mentions the thread stockings, which would have been less stylish, but warmer. The socks are going over the stockings, and tucked inside his shoes. Can't blame him at all in this record cold!

A. De Araujo   Link to this

or to go one step further"I dont give a s..."

Terry Foreman   Link to this

A fart is so less substantial than a s....

cum salis grano   Link to this

stock vs stocking
lifted from the OED
Sock n1
9 classifications'

[OE. socc, ad. L. soccus a light low-heeled shoe or slipper: of the same origin are OHG. soch, soc (MHG. soc, socke, G. socke, socken), MLG. socke, MDu. socke, soc (Du. zok, WFris. sok), OIcel. sokkr (Icel. sokkur, Norw. sokk, Sw. sock, Da. sokke). Also F. soque (1611).]

1. a. A covering for the foot, of the nature of a light shoe, slipper, or pump. Now rare or Obs.

1613 PURCHAS Pilgrimage (1614) 621 Not being permitted to weare shooes, but in stead thereof vse sockes made of Rushes. 1663 WATERHOUSE Fortescutus Illustr. 430 A Shooe like a slipper with an heel, which we call a Sock. 1687 A. LOVELL tr. Thevenot's Trav. I. 30 Their Stockins are of Cloth the length of the leg, the feet whereof are socks of yellow or red Leather..sewed to the Stockins. 1799

b. [After It. zoccollo.] A sandal, patten, or clog. Obs. rare.
1691

2. a. A short stocking covering the foot and usually reaching to the calf of the leg; half-hose; also, = ankle sock.
1327 ...
1621 BURTON Anat. Mel. I. iii. I. ii. (1651) 184 One pulled off his socks, another made ready his bed. 1682 DRYDEN Medal Ep. to Whigs, Even Protestant Socks are bought up among you, out of veneration to the name. 1753

n2 plowshare
n3 1. Suck (given to a child). Obs.
n4 1. A blow; a beating. Chiefly in phr. to give (one) sock(s, to give a sound thrashing or beating. Also in phr. a sock in the eye (also fig.).
a1700 ..
n5 Eatables of various kinds, especially dainties.
1825
n6 A pet child or young animal.
1837
n7
[Of obscure origin: the senses have prob. no connexion with each other.]

1. ? A small coin. (Cf. RAG n.1 2c.) Obs.{em}1
1688 SHADWELL Sqr. Alsatia I. i, I went up to the Gaming Ordinary and lost all my Ready; they left me not a rag or sock.

n8 Abbrev. of SOCKET n.
1803

Stocking
f. STOCK v.1 (sense 3) + -ING1.]

1. a. A close-fitting garment covering the foot, the leg, and often the knee, usually made of knitted or woven wool, silk, or cotton; now spec. as a woman's usu. diaphanous leg-covering (esp. of silk or nylon) reaching to the thigh. Chiefly pl.
1583 STUBBES Anat. Abus
...
1603 [see JERSEY1 1]. 1607 E. H. Stow's Chron. 477 This yeare 1589 was diuised and perfected the Art of knitting or weauing of silke stockings,..and diuerse other things by engines or steele Loomes by William Lee.
1613 SHAKES. Hen. VIII, I. iii. 30 Renouncing cleane The faith they haue in Tennis and tall Stockings, Short blistred Breeches.
1648 SIR J. TURNER Mem. (Bannatyne Club) 59 Riseing nixt morning, I misd one linnen stockine, one halfe silke one and one boothose, the accoustrement under a boote for one leg.
1697 Lond. Gaz. No. 3269/4 [Stolen] out of a Bag, half a dozen pair of Roll Stockins, and 18 pair of short Stockins.

b. ? A kind of legging or long boot, a ‘boot-hose’ or ‘boot-stocking’. Obs.
1676 WOOD Life 21 Apr. (O.H.S.) II. 344 To Mr. Prince for a pair of riding leather stockings, 5s.

2. A stocking used a. as a purse or receptacle for storing one's money; hence, a store of money; also with qualifying word, as big, fat, long stocking. 1873

3. a. A surgical appliance resembling a stocking. elastic stocking, a covering of elastic webbing worn as a remedial support for the leg, esp. when affected with varicose veins. b. A bandage for the leg of a horse.
[1676 WISEMAN Chirurg. Treat. II. ii. 170 In stead of a Rowler I put on a laced Stocking.]

b. to throw the stocking: said with reference to an old custom according to which on the wedding night the bride's stocking was thrown among the guests; it was supposed that the person hit by it would be the first of the company to be married.
For other forms of this custom see Eng. Dial. Dict. s.v.
1694
stocking, vbl. n.
1. The action or process of fixing (a bell) to its stock, or furnishiing (a gun) with a stock.
1450
2. a. The uprooting of trees or plants. Also with up. Also pl. (see quot. 1851). b. (See quot. 1611.)
c1460

stocking-apple
[? f. STOCKING vbl. n. in the sense ‘keeping in stock’.]

A kind of cider-apple. local.
1629 PARKINSON Parad. (1904) 588 The Stoken apple is a reasonable good apple.
1656 BEALE Heref. Orchards (1657) 45 The apples we commend for grafts, are the Stockin-apple [etc.].
1676 WORLIDGE Cyder 163 The Stocken or Stoken-Apple is likewise in esteem there [in the cider countries], although not known by that name in many places.
3. The action of supplying with a stock or store; the furnishing (a farm) with cattle and implements or (a garden) with plants; also, keeping in stock.

1663 Act 15 Chas. II, c. 1 §15 All..Implements of Husbandry, and all other things whatsoever, imployed in the Husbanding Stocking and Manureing of their..Lands.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...for it will let him know another time that he is not to expect our submitting to him in every thing, as I think he did heretofore expect. He did speak many severe words to me, and I returned as many to him, so that I do think there cannot for a great while, be, any right peace between us, and I care not a fart for it; but however, I must look about me and mind my business, for I perceive by his threats and enquiries he is and will endeavour to find out something against me or mine."

Hmmn... "our submitting to him"... I see Sam has decided to turn to a "team Navy" pose, no doubt looking to Batten and even Penn for support against milord.

"...perceive by his threats and enquiries he is and will endeavour to find out something against me or mine..." Sam did do some business with Abigail a while back; I wonder if Bruncker is hinting that he has the goods on one Pepys.

The game of office politics goes on...Sides shift, new alliances are formed. No wonder poor Coventry wants out. It's a shame we don't have his diary, it would be fascinating to see his "above the battle" view of the office right now. I suspect he'd show some disappointment in Sam...That "bright young man"'s fever for reform degrading into self-aggrandizement and self-defence.

Though the future will prove Sir William chose the right protege.

Log in to post an annotation.

If you don't have an account, then register here.