Monday 31 December 1666

Rising this day with a full design to mind nothing else but to make up my accounts for the year past, I did take money, and walk forth to several places in the towne as far as the New Exchange, to pay all my debts, it being still a very great frost and good walking. I staid at the Fleece Tavern in Covent Garden while my boy Tom went to W. Joyce’s to pay what I owed for candles there. Thence to the New Exchange to clear my wife’s score, and so going back again I met Doll Lane (Mrs. Martin’s sister), with another young woman of the Hall, one Scott, and took them to the Half Moon Taverne and there drank some burnt wine with them, without more pleasure, and so away home by coach, and there to dinner, and then to my accounts, wherein, at last, I find them clear and right; but, to my great discontent, do find that my gettings this year have been 573l. less than my last: it being this year in all but 2,986l.; whereas, the last, I got 3,560l.. And then again my spendings this year have exceeded my spendings the last by 644l.: my whole spendings last year being but 509l.; whereas this year, it appears, I have spent 1154l., which is a sum not fit to be said that ever I should spend in one year, before I am master of a better estate than I am. Yet, blessed be God! and I pray God make me thankful for it, I do find myself worth in money, all good, above 6,200l.; which is above 1800l. more than I was the last year. This, I trust in God, will make me thankfull for what I have, and carefull to make up by care next year what by my negligence and prodigality I have lost and spent this year. The doing of this, and entering of it fair, with the sorting of all my expenses, to see how and in what points I have exceeded, did make it late work, till my eyes become very sore and ill, and then did give over, and supper, and to bed. Thus ends this year of publick wonder and mischief to this nation, and, therefore, generally wished by all people to have an end. Myself and family well, having four mayds and one clerk, Tom, in my house, and my brother, now with me, to spend time in order to his preferment. Our healths all well, only my eyes with overworking them are sore as candlelight comes to them, and not else; publick matters in a most sad condition; seamen discouraged for want of pay, and are become not to be governed: nor, as matters are now, can any fleete go out next year. Our enemies, French and Dutch, great, and grow more by our poverty. The Parliament backward in raising, because jealous of the spending of the money; the City less and less likely to be built again, every body settling elsewhere, and nobody encouraged to trade. A sad, vicious, negligent Court, and all sober men there fearful of the ruin of the whole kingdom this next year; from which, good God deliver us! One thing I reckon remarkable in my owne condition is, that I am come to abound in good plate, so as at all entertainments to be served wholly with silver plates, having two dozen and a half.

20 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

John Evelyn's Diary

December 31. Blessed God for his Protection of me & mine this past yeare:

http://www.gyford.com/archive/2009/04/28/www.ge...

CGS   Link to this

He"...to pay all my debts..."
he then settles the score "...Thence to the New Exchange to clear my wife’s score,...".

Credit [tic, tab, chit, ticket, score, debt,IOU , sou,,,] by any other name is still makes one indebted.

Nate   Link to this

I wonder if he counts the value of his plate in his accounts? If so, I imagine that the resale value is less than was paid for it.

Nate   Link to this

BTW Happy New Year to all and all of yours. Live well and prosper in the new year.

Larry Bunce   Link to this

The 6,200 pounds Pepys is worths translates to 8.9 million today relative to average earnings. Not bad for a 33 year old. There was a time when having your age in thousands of dollars was considered doing well.
Happu New Year Sam and all.

cape henry   Link to this

"Thus ends this year of publick wonder and mischief to this nation, and, therefore, generally wished by all people to have an end."

Indeed. So Happy New Year to all who contribute so much to our understanding and all who read these pages.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"my brother, now with me, to spend time in order to [secure] his preferment"

preferment

Pronunciation: \pri-ˈfər-mənt\
Function: noun
Date: 15th century

1 a : advancement or promotion in dignity, office, or station b : a position or office of honor or profit
2 : priority or seniority in right especially to receive payment or to purchase property on equal terms with others
3 : the act of bringing forward (as charges) http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/prefe...

mary k mcintyre   Link to this

Happy New Year everyone -- like Sam, we have had a year of "publick wonder and mischief", let's hope 2010 brings us all better.

xoM

Michael Robinson   Link to this

Spoiler -- ODNB Entry -- the 350 anniversary of beginning the Diary is upon us.

Pepys, Samuel (1633–1703), naval official and diarist, was born at the family home, Salisbury Court, Fleet Street, London, on 23 February 1633, the second son of John Pepys (1601–1680), tailor, and his wife, Margaret, née Kite (d. 1667), daughter of a Whitechapel butcher. He was the fifth of their eleven children, and the oldest to survive into adulthood. He was baptized on 3 March in St Bride's Church by James Palmer. Although his immediate background was urban and modest, Pepys's family came from Cottenham, Cambridgeshire, and he had landed connections there and in Huntingdonshire. Among these was his father's brother Robert, who owned an estate at Brampton, Huntingdonshire, which Pepys eventually inherited. Of more immediate importance was the marriage of John Pepys's aunt Paulina to Sir Sydney Montagu of Hinchingbrooke; their son Edward Mountagu (later earl of Sandwich), who was to have a large place in the Commonweath regime and a larger one in its overthrow, was the agent for Pepys's advancement into public service.

Continued, for seven days only at:
http://www.oxforddnb.com/public/lotw/

Tony Eldridge   Link to this

all sober men there fearful of the ruin of the whole kingdom this next year; from which, good God deliver us!
Nothing changes, does it? Let's hope God, or someone, delivers all of us. Happy New Year!

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"Thence to the New Exchange to clear my wife’s score, and so going back again I met Doll Lane (Mrs. Martin’s sister), with another young woman of the Hall, one Scott, and took them to the Half Moon Taverne and there drank some burnt wine with them, without more pleasure..."

Heaven...

"So I can hope 1667 will be better in Diarytime?"

"Bess...I quote '...cleared my wife's (My wife's) score...without more pleasure...' Without...More...Pleasure, Bess."

"Gee...What a redemption. Did the Spirits of New Years Past, Present, and Future visit you that NYE?"

"Bess..."

"And this...
'...then to my accounts, wherein, at last, I find them clear and right; but, to my great discontent, do find that my gettings this year have been 573l. less than my last: it being this year in all but 2,986l.; whereas, the last, I got 3,560l.. And then again my spendings this year have exceeded my spendings the last by 644l.: my whole spendings last year being but 509l.; whereas this year, it appears, I have spent 1154l., which is a sum not fit to be said that ever I should spend in one year, before I am master of a better estate than I am. Yet, blessed be God! and I pray God make me thankful for it, I do find myself worth in money, all good, above 6,200l.; which is above 1800l. more than I was the last year. This, I trust in God, will make me thankfull for what I have, and carefull to make up by care next year what by my negligence and prodigality I have lost and spent this year.' ...all that and you don't even mention me in all this reckoning of blessing."

"Of course I do... '...myself and family...' See?"

" ...and family...?'

"Well...I don't talk about my health here."

"For which I'm sure we're all grateful..."

"But the spirit of my happiness is clearly wrapped around you. '...without more pleasure...' I remind you."

CGS   Link to this

Name Cottenham and Pepys dothe live on, 'twas in the daily read.
"One for the diary: a Pepys is to wed"
out of context.
"a descendant of Samuel Pepys (whose diaries were almost as admired as my own)"

Mary   Link to this

But, as far as we know, our Pepys had no direct descendants .... certainly none acknowledged as such. ... and brother John died unmarried at the age of 36.

This Pepys must be a collateral descendant of some kind. Any details given?

Fern   Link to this

When I was a youngster I used to attend a youth group in Raynes Park, SW London. I used to walk up Pepys Rd which led into Cottenham Park Rd. Perhaps the family owned land in that area too.

Australian Susan   Link to this

John's preferment: Sam is looking out for a living for him - presumably Sandwich does not have any livings in his gift (or they are all sold to or occupied by more immediate relatives) to help out here. We do not seem to have heard anything of Sam being diligent in this connection, unlike his recording of efforts to find Balty an office (muster master). He does not seem to have had a terribly high opinion of his brother.

CGS   Link to this

stop complaining Tars, yoall get thy fart[h]ings

H o C today
Seamen and Naval Stores.

AN ingrossed Bill, to prevent the Disturbances of Seamen, and others; and to preserve the Stores of his Majesty's Navy Royal; was read.

Resolved, &c. That the Bill do pass: And that the Title shall be, An Act to prevent the Disturbances of Seamen, and others; and to preserve the Stores of his Majesty's Navy Royal.

{All Atheist to be ...}
Atheism, &c.

An ingrossed Bill for punishing and preventing Atheism, Profaneness, and profane Cursing and Swearing, was read.

Resolved, &c. That the Bill do pass: And that the Title shall be, An Act for punishing and preventing Atheism, Profaneness, and profane Cursing and Swearing.

CGS   Link to this

Cottenham connection via wiki, lifted
"
The title of the earldom is derived from the village of Cottenham (pronounced "Cot-nam") in Cambridgeshire, birthplace of John Pepys, ancestor of the first Earl, and great-uncle of Samuel Pepys the diarist."

Paul Chapin   Link to this

So we've survived the plague, the fire, and (so far) the Dutch and the French, and are 1800L richer than last year, but still it was a year "generally wished by all people to have an end." Not a whole lot different from 2009, I'd say, with a few substitute nouns.

Happy New Year and New Decade to all on this blog, one of the good things of the year past and the year to come.

Paul Chapin   Link to this

"it being still a very great frost and good walking"

I guess the walking is better when the ground is frozen instead of muddy.

CGS   Link to this

'I guess the walking is better when the ground is frozen instead of muddy.'
Yep, Mother/Nanny does not cuss you out on those days for traipsing in the mud.

Log in to post an annotation.

If you don't have an account, then register here.