Sunday 21 October 1666

(Lord’s day). Up, and with my wife to church, and her new woman Barker with her the first time. The girle will, I think, do very well. Here a lazy sermon, and so home to dinner, and took in my Lady Pen and Peg (Sir William being below with the fleete), and mighty merry we were, and then after dinner presently (it being a mighty cool day) I by coach to White Hall, and there attended the Cabinet, and was called in before the King and them to give an account of our want of money for Tangier, which troubles me that it should be my place so often and so soon after one another to come to speak there of their wants — the thing of the world that they love least to hear of, and that which is no welcome thing to be the solicitor for — and to see how like an image the King sat and could not speak one word when I had delivered myself was very strange; only my Lord Chancellor did ask me, whether I thought it was in nature at this time to help us to anything. So I was referred to another meeting of the Lords Commissioners for Tangier and my Lord Treasurer, and so went away, and by coach home, where I spent the evening in reading Stillingfleet’s defence of the Archbishopp, the part about Purgatory, a point I had never considered before, what was said for it or against it, and though I do believe we are in the right, yet I do not see any great matter in this book. So to supper; and my people being gone, most of them, to bed, my boy and Jane and I did get two of my iron chests out of the cellar into my closett, and the money to my great satisfaction to see it there again, and the rather because the damp cellar spoils all my chests. This being done, and I weary, to bed. This afternoon walking with Sir H. Cholmly long in the gallery, he told me, among many other things, how Harry Killigrew is banished the Court lately, for saying that my Lady Castlemayne was a little lecherous girle when she was young … This she complained to the King of, and he sent to the Duke of York, whose servant he is, to turn him away. The Duke of York hath done it, but takes it ill of my Lady that he was not complained to first. She attended him to excute it, but ill blood is made by it. He told me how Mr. Williamson stood in a little place to have come into the House of Commons, and they would not choose him; they said, “No courtier.” And which is worse, Bab May went down in great state to Winchelsea with the Duke of York’s letters, not doubting to be chosen; and there the people chose a private gentleman in spite of him, and cried out they would have no Court pimp to be their burgesse; which are things that bode very ill. This afternoon I went to see and sat a good while with Mrs. Martin, and there was her sister Doll, with whom, contrary to all expectation, I did what I would, and might have done anything else.

12 Annotations

Michael L   Link to this

"I did get two of my iron chests out of the cellar into my closett, and the money to my great satisfaction to see it there again"

Visions of Scrooge McDuck throwing gold pieces in the air -- "I'm rich! Rich!"

Jesse   Link to this

"no Court pimp to be their burgesse"

On first thought why not, maybe it'd be a good vehicle to get the King's ear. On second thought it's probably a nascent form of checks and balances.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"This afternoon I went to see and sat a good while with Mrs. Martin, and there was her sister Doll, with whom, contrary to all expectation, I did what I would, and might have done anything else."

Speaking of Court pimps, Sam...How is Bagwell these days? Not to mention the Mitchell campaign...

Michael Robinson   Link to this

" ... Stillingfleet’s defence of the Archbishopp, ...

'A rational account of the grounds of Protestant religion: being a vindication of the Lord Archbishop of Canterbury’s relation of a conference, &c ... (1665)'
http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/10460/#d...

Michael Robinson   Link to this

"... which troubles me that it should be my place so often and so soon after one another to come to speak there of their wants — the thing of the world that they love least to hear of, and that which is no welcome thing to be the solicitor for ..."

HM Clerk of the Acts and Treasurer of Tangier having a 'low man on the totem-pole' problem.

Michael Robinson   Link to this

"... was a little lecherous girle when she was young … "

" ... and used to rub her thing with her fingers, or against the end of forms, and that she must be rubbed with something else. This she complained to the King of -- ..." continues L&M's text.

Ruben   Link to this

“… was a little lecherous girle when she was young … “

” … and used to rub her thing with her fingers, or against the end of forms, and that she must be rubbed with something else. This she complained to the King of — …” continues L&M’s text.
Pure Pepys

Robert Gertz   Link to this

One of the very few times one is inclined to sympathize with Castlemaine.

djc   Link to this

", Bab May went down in great state to Winchelsea "

Text link to '2nd Earl of Winchelsea' should be to Winchelsea, a town in Sussex. ie Bab May was sponsored by the Duke to be MP for Winchelsea but the electorate decided otherwise.

Rex Gordon   Link to this

Harry (and Thomas) Killegrew

This bad apple didn't fall far from the tree. His father, Thomas Killegrew, had left England for the European continent during the Civil Wars. He roamed from capital to capital and on at least one occasion was expelled from a court (Venice) for some grotesque debaucheries. One of his diversions during his wandering was writing pornography, like one story called "The Possessing and Dispossessing of Several Nuns in the Nunnery at Tours in France." It is said that on a visit to the Louvre, seeing a painting of the Crucifixion between a portrait of Pope Innocent X and Louis XIV, he remarked, "Though I have often heard that our Saviour was hanged between two thieves, yet I never knew who they were until now." Charles welcomed Thomas into his entourage in exile and enjoyed his ribald humor and outrageous behavior. (Charles also enjoyed the behavior of Thomas' sister, Elizabeth, Lady Shannon, who spent many a night with him.)

On their return to England Thomas became groom of the bedchamber and later, chamberlain to Catherine of Braganza, while his wife was appointed first lady of the queen's privy chamber. He opened the Theatre Royal in what is now Drury Lane in 1663. In 1664 he put on one of his own plays called The Parson's Wedding, with an all-female cast, and explained its advantages:

When boys played women's parts, you'd think the stage
Was innocent in that tempting age.
No: for your amorous fathers then, like you,
Amongst those boys had playhouse misses, too.
They set those bearded beauties on their laps,
Men gave 'em kisses and the ladies claps.
But they, poor hearts, could not supply our room,
While we, in kindness to ourselves, and you,
Can hold our women to our lodgings, too.

A. De Araujo   Link to this

"and used to rub her thing with her fingers"
but she grew up unto serious pleasures!

A. Hamilton   Link to this

Harry Killigrew

As Rex Gordon points out, this Harry is the son of Thomas, not the Harry in the link.

Log in to post an annotation.

If you don't have an account, then register here.