Thursday 18 October 1666

Up, and to the office, where we sat all the morning. The waters so high in the roads, by the late rains, that our letters come not in till to-day, and now I understand that my father is got well home, but had a painful journey of it. At noon with Lord Bruncker to St. Ellen’s, where the master of the late Pope’s Head Taverne is now set up again, and there dined at Sir W. Warren’s cost, a very good dinner. Here my Lord Bruncker proffered to carry me and my wife into a play at Court to-night, and to lend me his coach home, which tempted me much; but I shall not do it. Thence rose from table before dinner ended, and homewards met my wife, and so away by coach towards Lovett’s (in the way wondering at what a good pretty wench our Barker makes, being now put into good clothes, and fashionable, at my charge; but it becomes her, so that I do not now think much of it, and is an example of the power of good clothes and dress), where I stood godfather. But it was pretty, that, being a Protestant, a man stood by and was my Proxy to answer for me. A priest christened it, and the boy’s name is Samuel. The ceremonies many, and some foolish. The priest in a gentleman’s dress, more than my owne; but is a Capuchin, one of the Queene-mother’s priests. He did give my proxy and the woman proxy (my Lady Bills, absent, had a proxy also) good advice to bring up the child, and, at the end, that he ought never to marry the child nor the godmother, nor the godmother the child or the godfather: but, which is strange, they say that the mother of the child and the godfather may marry. By and by the Lady Bills come in, a well-bred but crooked woman. The poor people of the house had good wine, and a good cake; and she a pretty woman in her lying-in dress. It cost me near 40s. the whole christening: to midwife 20s., nurse 10s., mayde 2s. 6d., and the coach 5s. I was very well satisfied with what I have done, and so home and to the office, and thence to Sir W. Batten’s, and there hear how the business of buying off the Chimney-money is passed in the House; and so the King to be satisfied some other way, and the King supplied with the money raised by this purchasing off of the chimnies. So home, mightily pleased in mind that I have got my bills of imprest cleared by bills signed this day, to my good satisfaction. To supper, and to bed.

8 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

John Evelyn's Diary

October 18 To Lond: Star-Chamber: thence to Court, it being the first time of his Majesties putting himselfe solemnly into the Eastern fashion of Vest, changing doublet, stiff Collar, [bands] & Cloake &c: into a comely Vest, after the Persian mode with girdle or shash, & Shoe strings & Garters, into bouckles, of which some were set with precious stones, resolving never to alter it, & to leave the French mode, which had hitherto obtained to our greate expense & reproch: upon which divers Courtiers & Gent: gave his Ma[jesty] gold, by way of Wager, that he would not persist in this resolution: I had some time before indeede presented an Invectique against that unconstancy, & our so much affecting the french fashion, to his Majestie in which [I] tooke occasion to describe the Comelinesse & usefullnesse of the Persian clothing in the very same manner, his Majestie clad himselfe; This Pamphlet I intituled Tyrannus or the mode, & gave it his Majestie to reade; I do not impute the change which soon happn’d to this discourse, but it was an identitie, that I could not but take notice of: This night was acted my Lord Brahals Tragedy cal’d Mustapha before their Majesties &c: at Court: at which I was present, very seldom at any time, going to the publique Theaters, for many reasons, now as they were abused, to an atheisticall liberty, fowle & undecent; Women now (& never ’til now) permitted to appeare & act, which inflaming severall young noble-men & gallants, became their whores, & to some their Wives, witnesse the Earle of Oxford, Sir R: Howard, Pr: Rupert, the E: of Dorset, & another greater person than any of these, who fell into their snares, to the reproch of their noble families, & ruine both of body & Soule: I was invited to see this Tragedie, exceedingly well writ, by my Lord Chamberlain, though in my mind, I did not approve of any such passe time, in a season of such Judgements & Calamitie:

http://www.geocities.com/Paris/LeftBank/1914/ed...

Australian Susan   Link to this

"...the ceremonies many, and some foolish. The priest in a gentleman’s dress,..."

Sam is probably referring to anointing with oil of catechumens on the chest and oil of chrism on forehead, ears, eyes, lips and giving of white garment. The Catholic rite is quite elaborate. Sam, not understanding the implications of all the parts would think it all rather silly. He also does not understand about the use of vestments as he seems surprised at the priest's dress - though I had to smile at Sam's little, revealing aside: "more than my owne". Although he had to have a proxy as he was not Catholic, he then took on all the godfatherly responsibilities once the child is baptised which could mean being expected to advance little Samuel's career once he is a teenager - a cultural expectation which Sam is anxious to avoid in the case of Mrs Martin's offspring!

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"to Sir W. Batten’s, and there hear how the business of buying off the Chimney-money is passed in the House; and so the King to be satisfied some other way, and the King supplied with the money raised by this purchasing off of the chimnies."

House of Commons Journal for today

Chimney Money.

Resolved, &c. That it be referred to the Committee appointed to bring in an Estimate of the yearly Value of Chimney Money, to prepare and bring in a Bill for the Purchasing off of Chimney Money:....

Resolved, &c. That the House be resolved into a Committee of the whole House, To-morrow Morning, Ten of the Clock, to consider of a Compensation to his Majesty, in lieu of Chimney Money; and of the effectual raising Eighteen hundred thousand Pounds Supply for his Majesty. http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?co...

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"(in the way wondering at what a good pretty wench our Barker makes, being now put into good clothes, and fashionable, at my charge; but it becomes her, so that I do not now think much of it, and is an example of the power of good clothes and dress)"

"Again..."

"The...rain in...Spain stays mainly in the...plain."

To Bess... "I think she's got it. I think she's got it."

"The rain in Spain stays mainly in the plain." Barker singing, proudly.

"If you don't get...Your hand off...Her waist, you'll get it..." Bess, glaring.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"what a good pretty wench our Barker makes, being now put into good clothes, and fashionable...and is an example of the power of good clothes and dress"

L&M note this passage from Daniel Defoe's *Everybody's Business*

"The apparel of our women-servants should be next regulated, that we may know the mistress from the maid. I remember I was once put very much to the blush, being at a friend’s house, and by him required to salute the ladies, I kissed the chamber-jade into the bargain, for she was as well dressed as the best. But I was soon undeceived by a general titter, which gave me the utmost confusion; nor can I believe myself the only person who has made such a mistake." http://www.gutenberg.org/files/2052/2052-h/2052...

Paul Chapin   Link to this

"another greater person than any of these, who fell into their snares" (from Evelyn's diary, as provided by Terry)
Presumably he's talking about Charles II and Nell Gwyn.

I like Evelyn a lot, but he sounds like somebody you wouldn't want to invite to a party.

Tony Eldridge   Link to this

"but, which is strange, they say that the mother of the child and the godfather may marry."
And Mrs Lovett is "a very beautiful woman" - no Sam, don't let your mind start wandering there.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"I like Evelyn a lot, but he sounds like somebody you wouldn’t want to invite to a party."

Oh, I dunno...He'd be interesting as to political/scientific and if he's a bit prudish, any detected hypocrisy at the party (he is, after all, friend to Sam Pepys) would be vastly entertaining in its own way. Procopius is never so much fun as when he's sanctimoniously denouncing his imperial mistress, the Empress Theodora, she of the somewhat checkered past...Behind poor Theo's imperious back of course.

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