Tuesday 8 May 1666

Up, and to the office all the morning. At noon dined at home, my wife’s cheek bad still. After dinner to the office again and thither comes Mr. Downing, the anchor-smith, who had given me 50 pieces in gold the last month to speake for him to Sir W. Coventry, for his being smith at Deptford; but after I had got it granted to him, he finds himself not fit to go on with it, so lets it fall. So has no benefit of my motion. I therefore in honour and conscience took him home the money, and, though much to my grief, did yet willingly and forcibly force him to take it again, the poor man having no mind to have it. However, I made him take it, and away he went, and I glad to have given him so much cause to speake well of me. So to my office again late, and then home to supper to a good lobster with my wife, and then a little to my office again, and so to bed.

10 Annotations

Terry Foreman   Link to this

John Evelyn's Diary

8 To Queenborow where finding the Richmond fregate I sailed to the B[o]uy of the Noore to my L: Gen: & Prince Rupert where was the Rendezvous of the most glorious Fleete in the World, now preparing to meete the Hollander: having received orders & settled my buisinesse there, I return’d on the 9th to Chattham at night: next day I went to visit my Co: Hales at a sweetely watred place near Bochton at Chilston: The next morning to Leeds-Castle, once a famous hold &c. now hired by me of my Lord Culpeper for a Prison: here I flowed the drie moate and made a new draw bridge, brought also Spring Water into the Court of the Castle to an old fountaine, & tooke order for the repaires:

http://www.geocities.com/Paris/LeftBank/1914/ed...

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Decent (and no doubt, wise) thing to do, Sam.

Lawrence   Link to this

That's a lot of money?

"month to speake for him to Sir W. Coventry, for his being smith at Deptford; but after I had got it granted to him, he finds himself not fit to go on with it, so lets it fall. So has no benefit of my motion. I therefore in honour and conscience took him home the money, and, though much to my grief, did yet willingly and forcibly force him to take it again, the poor man having no mind to have it. However, I made him take it, and away he went, and I glad to have given him so much cause to speake well of me"

How much money? does Sam keep in his House, and

where? well they never had paper money, so I wonder what that weighed when he pushed it on to him?

Paul Chapin   Link to this

George Downing was a man of many parts, but being an anchor-smith was surely not one of them. The link between this Mr.Downing and Sir George is unwarranted.

cgs   Link to this

"...Mr. Downing, the anchor-smith..."
Downing be not the one of street no 10 but another character, THE Downing , a, be a tight wad, b, knows the ways and means of discretion, also Sam be still in Awe of Sir George. This guy be one that wroughts iron for ships to weigh anchor.
A smithy of the old forge, not the forger of documents secret.

Mark Peaty [aka Xodarap]   Link to this

"A smithy of the old forge, not the forger of documents secret."

lol ... Mr Salty does it again ...

A. De Araujo   Link to this

"and I glad to have given him so much cause to speake well of me"
soliloquy
Mr Downing: Samuel Pepys is the nicest kickback taker that I have seen in all my life.

JWB   Link to this

From "The Big Anchor Project":

"16th-17th century anchors
The earliest drawings of an anchor with details of its weight and dimensions appears in “Fragments of Ancient Shipwrightry” attributed to Matthew Baker, dated to the late 16th or early 17th Century. Most anchors during this period had curved arms, but as larger anchors were required the straight arm anchor was introduced to English vessels. The flukes were generally the shape of equilateral triangles and half the length of the arms. The anchor ring was slightly smaller diameter than the fluke. The anchor stock was roughly the same length as the shank, made from timbers bound with iron hoops. Wooden pegs or treenails were used to secure the timbers in the stock, which was straight on the top and tapered on the other three sides.

In 1627 Captain John Smith published “A Sea Grammer2 which provided a list of the different types of anchors carried by ships at that time. It listed:

•The kedger anchor - the smallest of the anchors used in calm weather
•The stream anchor – only a little larger used in an easy tide/stream
•The bow anchor – larger - 4 in total
•The sheet anchor – the largest and heaviest of all used in emergencies
Anchor weight was in proportion to the size of the ship. A ship of 500 tons would have a sheet anchor weight 2000 pounds of 907 kg’s."

http://www.biganchorproject.com/index.php?optio...

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Parliamentary Investigating Committee...

"So, Mr. Downing...?"

"Mr. Speaker! Motion to note this is not me." Sir George rises.

"So noted, Sir George. This is not you, sir."

"Mr. Downing. As to your dealings with Mr. Samuel Pepys."

"Generous and fair, sir. An ever-upright man..."

Phew...Sam mops brow. Another bullet dodged...God bless Dennis Gauden and my favorite smithy...

"Why do you know, sir...He actually returned the 50 pieces I'd given him."

Ummn...Ok, ok...Still not disaster...Sam moves in chair...

"He refused a bribe from you, sir?"

"Oh, no. But when he couldn't do anything for me, he returned the money. Can you imagine?"

Dryly...Eye to the newly sweating Pepys. "No, Mr. Downing. Honesty in bribery is something rare."

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