Monday 5 February 1665/66

Up, and with Sir W. Batten (at whose lodgings calling for him, I saw his Lady the first time since her coming to towne since the plague, having absented myself designedly to shew some discontent, and that I am not at all the more suppliant because of my Lord Sandwich’s fall), to my Lord Bruncker’s, to see whether he goes to the Duke’s this morning or no. But it is put off, and so we parted. My Lord invited me to dinner to-day to dine with Sir W. Batten and his Lady there, who were invited before, but lest he should thinke so little an invitation would serve my turne I refused and parted, and to Westminster about business, and so back to the ‘Change, and there met Mr. Hill, newly come to town, and with him the Houblands, preparing for their ship’s and his going to Tangier, and agreed that I must sup with them to-night. So home and eat a bit, and then to White Hall to a Committee for Tangier, but it did not meet but was put off to to-morrow, so I did some little business and visited my Lord Sandwich, and so, it raining, went directly to the Sun, behind the Exchange, about seven o’clock, where I find all the five brothers Houblons, and mighty fine gentlemen they are all, and used me mighty respectfully. We were mighty civilly merry, and their discourses, having been all abroad, very fine. Here late and at last accompanied home with Mr. J. Houblon and Hill, whom I invited to sup with me on Friday, and so parted and I home to bed.

11 Annotations

cape henry   Link to this

"...but lest he should thinke so little an invitation would serve my turne I refused and parted." This passage got my attention, too, TF. It indicates to me the confidence that has been building in Pepys, especially lately. I think that a year ago he would have been reluctant to refuse. I imagine we can all recall an entry in which he grouses loudly about the "company at dinner" who ever they might have been at the time.

Margaret   Link to this

"My Lord invited me to dinner to-day to dine with Sir W. Batten and his Lady there..."

I was puzzled by this at first, because I thought "My Lord" (without any qualifying name) always meant Sandwich--but I suppose Pepys meant Lord Bruncker in this case.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"I thought “My Lord” (without any qualifying name) always meant Sandwich—but I suppose Pepys meant Lord Bruncker in this case."

Pepys has been doing that lately, esp. since he's been hangin' w/ Brouncker a lot.

cgs   Link to this

My Liege it be, follow the money trail.
The kin' be 'ded' long 'liv' the kin'

Mary   Link to this

to serve one's turn.

OED turn (noun) 30b

To answer one's purpose or requirement; to suffice for or satisfy a need; to suit, answer, serve, avail; to be useful or helpful in an emergency.

The expression is still in use.

Todd Bernhardt   Link to this

"and that I am not at all the more suppliant because of my Lord Sandwich’s fall"

So, the only reason Sam has put up with Batten and his lady to the extent that he has is because Batten is also Sandwich's man, and Sam doesn't want to offend Sandwich by being rude to Batten?

Mary   Link to this

"all five brothers Houblons"

L&M has a delightful footnote here, to the effect that the Houblon brothers were a by-word for mutual affection.

All were merchants engaged in trade with Portugal, Spain and North Africa.

Jesse   Link to this

“and that I am not at all the more suppliant"

I read this as Pepys confidence in asserting himself, i.e. "designedly shew[ing] some discontent" despite rather than because of "Lord Sandwich's fall."

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Critical time for Sam...He must now stand or fall on his own and that bit of rumor earlier regarding Monke and his unhappiness over Sam's getting the CoA job, true or not, has put him on notice that he must make a "proud show" of his independence. Were he to seem nervous by fawning over Batten for protection now he'd likely forever be considered a lesser man in the office. Of course he has the Duke of York's and Coventry's favor (not to mention Charles' consideration) to back him up but it's still a brave face. In his way, Batten is no doubt likewise trying to see where the wind blows and if Sam seems flustered and anxious.

If the Duke and King had chosen to frown and ask questions about his involvement in the prize goods, things might be very different.

"Drool-bucket carrier to Lady Batten when not handling your affairs at the office, Sir Will? Oh, you are too good, Sir Will."

cgs   Link to this

Bagwell, where be thou; Samuell wishes to be A suppliant on thy lap, no longer he be Me Laud's humble petitioner.
And to boot Samuell may even agree with the Quakers and not doff his top hat.

Samuell no longer hoping for scraps of.... from me LAUD.

"...and that I am not at all the more suppliant because of my Lord Sandwich’s fall..."

suppliant
[a. F. suppliant (superseding older so(u)pleiant, -oiant), pr. pple. of supplier SUPPLY v.2
In early use sometimes stressed su{sm}ppliant.]

A. n. One who supplicates; a humble petitioner.
1429...

supplicate, A. n. = SUPPLIANT n.

JonTom in Massachusetts   Link to this

"So, the only reason Sam has put up with Batten and his lady to the extent that he has is because Batten is also Sandwich’s man, and Sam doesn’t want to offend Sandwich by being rude to Batten?"

Actually, Terry, I read it the opposite way: that Pepys is snubbing Batten because of his hostility to Sandwich and the bad reports Batten spread about Sandwich's conduct in battle. I read "I am not at all the more suppliant because of .." as "I am even less suppliant because of ..." rather than "I am no longer so suppliant because of ..."

I'm not positive of that reading, though.

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