Friday 17 November 1665

[Continued from yesterday. P.G.] Sailed all night, and got down to Quinbrough water, where all the great ships are now come, and there on board my Lord, and was soon received with great content. And after some little discourse, he and I on board Sir W. Pen; and there held a council of Warr about many wants of the fleete, but chiefly how to get slopps and victuals for the fleete now going out to convoy our Hambro’ ships, that have been so long detained for four or five months for want of convoy, which we did accommodate one way or other, and so, after much chatt, Sir W. Pen did give us a very good and neat dinner, and better, I think, than ever I did see at his owne house at home in my life, and so was the other I eat with him. After dinner much talke, and about other things, he and I about his money for his prize goods, wherein I did give him a cool answer, but so as we did not disagree in words much, and so let that fall, and so followed my Lord Sandwich, who was gone a little before me on board the Royall James. And there spent an houre, my Lord playing upon the gittarr, which he now commends above all musique in the world, because it is base enough for a single voice, and is so portable and manageable without much trouble. That being done, I got my Lord to be alone, and so I fell to acquaint him with W. Howe’s business, which he had before heard a little of from Captain Cocke, but made no great matter of it, but now he do, and resolves nothing less than to lay him by the heels, and seize on all he hath, saying that for this yeare or two he hath observed him so proud and conceited he could not endure him. But though I was not at all displeased with it, yet I prayed him to forbear doing anything therein till he heard from me again about it, and I had made more enquiry into the truth of it, which he agreed to. Then we fell to publique discourse, wherein was principally this: he cleared it to me beyond all doubt that Coventry is his enemy, and has been long so. So that I am over that, and my Lord told it me upon my proposal of a friendship between them, which he says is impossible, and methinks that my Lord’s displeasure about the report in print of the first fight was not of his making, but I perceive my Lord cannot forget it, nor the other think he can. I shewed him how advisable it were upon almost any terms for him to get quite off the sea employment. He answers me again that he agrees to it, but thinks the King will not let him go off: He tells me he lacks now my Lord Orrery to solicit it for him, who is very great with the King. As an infinite secret, my Lord tells me, the factions are high between the King and the Duke, and all the Court are in an uproare with their loose amours; the Duke of Yorke being in love desperately with Mrs. Stewart. Nay, that the Duchesse herself is fallen in love with her new Master of the Horse, one Harry Sidney, and another, Harry Savill. So that God knows what will be the end of it. And that the Duke is not so obsequious as he used to be, but very high of late; and would be glad to be in the head of an army as Generall; and that it is said that he do propose to go and command under the King of Spayne, in Flanders. That his amours to Mrs. Stewart are told the King. So that all is like to be nought among them. That he knows that the Duke of Yorke do give leave to have him spoken slightly of in his owne hearing, and doth not oppose it, and told me from what time he hath observed this to begin. So that upon the whole my Lord do concur to wish with all his heart that he could with any honour get from off the imployment. After he had given thanks to me for my kind visit and good counsel, on which he seems to set much by, I left him, and so away to my Bezan againe, and there to read in a pretty French book, “La Nouvelle Allegorique,” upon the strife between rhetorique and its enemies, very pleasant. So, after supper, to sleepe, and sayled all night, and came to Erith before break of day.

13 Annotations

cgs   Link to this

"...how to get slopps..." sloppy joes and jeans are still the slopps of the day along with the dregs of a cuppa, reminds me that for us old sweats, they be called denims.
As me olde Sgtmajor would indicate that I be like a stuffed sack of old junk tied in the middle.

jeannine   Link to this

"As an infinite secret, my Lord tells me, the factions are high between the King and the Duke, and all the Court are in an uproare with their loose amours; the Duke of Yorke being in love desperately with Mrs. Stewart”

From “La Belle Stuart” by Hartmann p. 89

“It is quite possible that the Duke had fallen in love with Frances, but it is difficult to believe that his advances to her would have greatly alarmed the King, who knew well that so vivacious a young lady was not likely to be attracted by anyone of so solemn and serious a character as His Grace of York. The brief coolness between the King and his brother was due to a different cause –His Majesty’s refusal to make Sir George Savile a viscount at the Duke’s request. It was true enough that the factions were high at Court; for Clarendon’s enemies had been active of late, and had almost succeeded in engineering a quarrel between him and the Treasurer”

Bryan M   Link to this

"saying that for this yeare or two he hath observed him so proud and conceited he could not endure him."

How very fortunate that Sam was not such a one.

language hat   Link to this

"it is base enough for a single voice"

This is presumably OED's definition 4: "Of sounds: Low, not loud; deep, bass."
c1450 Merlin xxviii. 572 He seide in bas voice: I am Monevall. c1500 Partenay 945 Ful gret mynstracy; Bothe hye and bas instrumentes sondry. 1596 SPENSER F.Q. III. ii. 50 Sad words with hollow voice and bace, Shee to the virgin sayd.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"“saying that for this yeare or two he hath observed him so proud and conceited he could not endure him.”

How very fortunate that Sam was not such a one."

One does imagine Sandwich giving Sam a rather careful stare during this conversation... (Thanks, Bryan)

"...so I fell to acquaint him with W. Howe’s business, which he had before heard a little of from Captain Cocke, but made no great matter of it, but now he do, and resolves nothing less than to lay him by the heels, and seize on all he hath...

("But my Lord, if you think Howe's behavior awful...Let me tell you about our friend, your protege, Pepys." Cocke shakes head.)

Seize on all he hath? Sam, pondering...

Vision of Sandwich's men storming through Seething Lane, those precious chests, the famed flagon, even the model of the Royal James in brute hands.

Hmmn...Perhaps a bit too much of a bad precedent...

"But though I was not at all displeased with it, yet I prayed him to forbear doing anything therein till he heard from me again about it, and I had made more enquiry into the truth of it, which he agreed to."

Phew...

Australian Susan   Link to this

"..many wants of the fleete, but chiefly how to get slopps .." The Navy were still having problems with slops at the sailing of The First Fleet in 1788 and there were many complaints about the poor quality of clothing issued to sailors and the convicts: either the material was so flimsy it came to bits or so rough that the trousers made of such material were called cockchafers. (this refers to a species of bird, of course).

My Lord's guitar: Lovely image of him playing "just one more melody" to Sam who stifles yawns. An hour of amateur musicianship can be infinitely tedious.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Aussie Sue, this Yank had to look up The First Fleet, which is the Down Under Mayflower plus.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Fleet

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"methinks that my Lord’s displeasure about the report in print of the first fight was not of his making"

L&M refer us to 23 June 1665: "[My Lord Sandwich] told me that he hath been with [the Duke of York and Mr Coventry] when they have made sport of the Prince and laughed at him: yet that all the discourse of the towne, and the printed relation, should not give him one word of honour my Lord thinks mighty strange; he assuring me, that though by accident the Prince was in the van the beginning of the fight for the first pass...." http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1665/06/23/

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"What do ye think, Pepys?"

"Excellent, my lord. Let me get my viol."

Uh...

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Seriously, I imagine the problem for Sandwich was that Howe had taken...Not waited for the benevolent patron to be bestow what he felt best. Creed and Pepys may grab whatever they can when not watched but Sam is (and I think Creed as well), careful to preserve the proper form.

A most sadde parting of the ways for Creed and Howe...

"Ah, Mr. Howe." shake of head. "I so regret that our days of good fellowship are at last at an end."

"Creed...I implore you...On the basis of our old association of long-time standing...As a comrade and a gentleman...Consider our days of fellowship and ask my Lord that he recollect my...unique...services."

"Howe, my dear fellow...To have forgotten the cardinal rule of our work. One does not steal...Openly...from these people."

"Hardly a theft, sir."

"My apologies, old friend... But it does amount to the same thing in the eyes of our dear superior. Indeed, tis most regretable. Ah, the Thames. Cab, stop!

I am sorry to say we must rush things along, Howe. Time and this tide, as you well know...Wait for no man."

"I must remind you...And my Lord...That I do know where the bodies are buried. Literally."

"Indeed, old friend. And, sadly, you are about to renew their acquaintance."

"Oh, John...Old friend...A moment to contemplate my past faults."

"Certainly, my friend."

"John, I dreamt a dream...Methinks I did think myself at liberty, at sea with my old friend Pepys and as we strolled the deck, discoursing on our sad exile, turning I did stumble and despite Pepys' endeavors to...Help me...I did fall in the billowing sea."

"Well, no fear of that on our quiet Thames..."

"Oh, what an agony methought twas to drown, to sink beneath the waves...And yet my dream was prolonged."

"Have I heard this...Somewhere...In longer form? What, did your dream continue even then?"

"Oh, yes. I did dream I sank beneath the waves and such sights as I saw..."

"Yes, yes...Well as I noted to you about time and tide..."

"Pepys!" Faint hopeful air...

"Ah, Pepys. About time."

"Pepys?...You can't wish to be a part of this..."

"Part of...?"

"Pepys, I do spy some kindness in thy face..."

"Ah, that's it. Very good, Howe. Pepys, just tell him to look behind him, would you? There's a good fellow. Sorry that we have no butt of good wine at hand, Howe."

"What?"

"'Look behind you, Howe.'"

"Look behind you, Howe? What the devil...? Isn't that from..."

Argggh...

"Trust ole Howe to go out with a touch of style. Do be a good chap and help me with this, Pepys."

Pedro   Link to this

“my Lord playing upon the gittarr, which he now commends above all musique in the world, because it is base enough for a single voice, and is so portable and manageable without much trouble.”

Ollard in his biography of Sandwich refers to this Diary entry and describes Sandwich’s sudden passion for the gittarr as fortunate if not trivial. He adds that his acquired taste for music, and some skill as an instrumentalist, probably entered his life from the society of bailiffs, and that Pepys had noted in 1662 that Sandwich had a preference for fiddler’s tunes and simple airs over the fantasies that they had been used to playing together.

He quotes Evelyn as saying that Sandwich was learned in mathematics, musique and sea affairs.

A. De Araujo   Link to this

"the Duke of Yorke being in love desperatly with Mrs. Stewart"
How was this love manifested?Giving her lots of attention?Stalking?Confiding to courtiers?

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"Your Grace please...Your wife..."

"Frances, darling just listen... I have written you a poem."

"You what?"

Duke on knee...

"'My soul is wracked in harsh repose
Midnight descends in raven colored clothes
But soft, behold! A sunlight beam
Cutting a swath of glimmering gleam
My heart expands, 'tis grown a bulge in't,
Inspired by your beauty effulgent.'"

"Frances, where are you going? Frances...?"

"Coventry!!"

"Your Grace? How did it...?"

"Your poem sucked, William."

"Tis only a hobby...I did tell you that, Your Grace."

"Well, plan B...Thugs!!"

"Sir!!!" the thugs, in chorus.

(and now at last fans of "Buffy" know from whom William was descended...)

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