Sunday 19 March 1664/65

(Lord’s day). Mr. Povy sent his coach for me betimes, and I to him, and there to our great trouble do find that my Lord FitzHarding do appear for Mr. Brunkard to be Paymaster upon Povy’s going out, by a former promise of the Duke’s, and offering to give as much as any for it. This put us all into a great dumpe, and so we went to Creed’s new lodging in the Mewes, and there we found Creed with his parrot upon his shoulder, which struck Mr. Povy coming by just by the eye, very deep, which, had it hit his eye, had put it out. This a while troubled us, but not proving very bad, we to our business consulting what to do; at last resolved, and I to Mr. Coventry, and there had his most friendly and ingenuous advice, advising me not to decline the thing, it being that that will bring me to be known to great persons, while now I am buried among three or four of us, says he, in the Navy; but do not make a declared opposition to my Lord FitzHarding. Thence I to Creed, and walked talking in the Park an hour with him, and then to my Lord Sandwich’s to dinner, and after dinner to Mr. Povy’s, who hath been with the Duke of Yorke, and, by the mediation of Mr. Coventry, the Duke told him that the business shall go on, and he will take off Brunkerd, and my Lord FitzHarding is quiett too. But to see the mischief, I hear that Sir G. Carteret did not seem pleased, but said nothing when he heard me proposed to come in Povy’s room, which may learn me to distinguish between that man that is a man’s true and false friend. Being very glad of this news Mr. Povy and I in his coach to Hyde Parke, being the first day of the tour there. Where many brave ladies; among others, Castlemayne lay impudently upon her back in her coach asleep, with her mouth open. There was also my Lady Kerneguy, once my Lady Anne Hambleton, that is said to have given the Duke a clap upon his first coming over. Here I saw Sir J. Lawson’s daughter and husband, a fine couple, and also Mr. Southwell and his new lady, very pretty. Thence back, putting in at Dr. Whore’s, where I saw his lady, a very fine woman. So home, and thither by my desire comes by and by Creed and lay with me, very merry and full of discourse, what to do to-morrow, and the conveniences that will attend my having of this place, and I do think they may be very great.

25 Annotations

Pedro   Link to this

"and there we found Creed with his parrot upon his shoulder, which struck Mr. Povy coming by just by the eye, very deep, which, had it hit his eye, had put it out."

Poor old Povey, everyone has it in for him, even the parrot. Remarkable bird the Norwegian Blue!

http://www.mtholyoke.edu/~ebarnes/python/dead-p...

Pedro   Link to this

On this day 19/29th March...

De Ruyter sights the Bay of Barbados where he had decided to capture English merchantmen, but the English had been warned. The warship that De Ruyter had released at Goree, merchantmen, and the two fortresses received him with heavy firing and caused them much damage. After an hour and a half his flagship was practically helpless and he decided to give up the attack, as he never liked to undertake the impossible...he made for the French island of Martinique, and we may be sure that the desire to place his booty in safety played a considerable part in his decision.

(The Life of Admiral De Ruyterby Blok)

Carl in Boston   Link to this

I to Mr. Coventry, and there had his most friendly and ingenuous advice, advising me not to decline the thing, it being that that will bring me to be known to great persons,
A young wolf learning from an old wolf. Wonderful to see. May we all have fatherly wolves to help us along. Trouble is, I get to be the old wolf these days.

Martin   Link to this

The sleeping Castlemayne fresh on his mind, Same visits Dr. Hoare (and his fine lady), but writes "Dr. Whore."

Patricia   Link to this

"There was also my Lady Kerneguy, once my Lady Anne Hambleton, that is said to have given the Duke a clap upon his first coming over."
Does this mean she gave the Duke "a" clap, or "the" clap? And if the former, does it mean "a (dose of) clap? Or am I reading the wrong thing into this?

Australian Susan   Link to this

Parrot

Wonder what species of parrot this was? maybe an African Grey brought back by one of the African Company ships as a present for Creed?
http://wishes.debian.co.nz/birds/uploads/Parrot...
These are very intelligent and long-lived birds.
Here is a delightful Dutch painting of the 1660s of "A Moor presenting a Parrot to a lady". Actually it's a macaw, not a parrot,but never mind that - look at the lady's expression! Wonderful!
http://www.kipar.org/period-galleries/paintings...

Paul Chapin   Link to this

a clap

No, Patricia, you're reading it just right. OED (which daintily calls the word "Obsolete in polite use") gives citations from 1645 to 1806 showing the word used with "a" and also in the plural. These patterns are now obsolete in impolite use.

Paul Chapin   Link to this

Parrot attacks, politicking for Povy's post, and many brave ladies, including Castlemaine agape - a colorful, exciting day for Sam.

Michael Robinson   Link to this

" ... there we found Creed with his parrot upon his shoulder, ..."

"The rest of the Inhabitants of that World, were men of several different sorts, shapes, figures, dispositions, and humors, as I have already made mention heretofore; some were Bear-men, some Worm-men, some Fish- or Mear-men, otherwise called Syrenes; some Bird-men, some Fly-men, some Ant-men, some Geese-men, some Spider-men, some Lice-men, some Fox-men, some Ape-men, some Jack-daw-men, some Magpie-men, some Parrot-men, some Satyrs, some Gyants, and many more, which I cannot all remember; and of these several sorts of men, each followed such a profession as was most proper for the nature of their species, which the Empress encouraged them in, especially those that had applied themselves to the study of several Arts and Sciences; for they were as ingenious and witty in the invention of profitable and useful Arts, as we are in our world, nay, more; and to that end she erected Schools, and founded several Societies. The Bear-men were to be her Experimental Philosophers, the Bird-men her Astronomers, the Fly-Worm- and Fish-men her Natural Philosophers, the Ape-men her Chymists, the Satyrs her Galenick Physicians, the Fox-men her Polititians, the Spider- and Lice-men her Mathematicians, the Jackdaw- Magpie- and Parrot-men her Orators and Logicians, ..."

Margaret Cavendish, 'The Description Of A New World, Called The Blazing World' (1666)
http://www.pos1.info/b/blazworld.htm

andy   Link to this

This put us all into a great dumpe,

I think I've been put into one too, this morning. It's an office thing.

andy   Link to this

Going to forst of 3 Project Boards now, will watch out for the parrot.

Bryan M   Link to this

“Where many brave ladies; among others, Castlemayne lay impudently upon her back in her coach asleep, with her mouth open.”

Some where along the line Sam’s attitude towards (my Lady) Castlemayne seems to taken a turn for the worse.

Saturday 23 August 1662
But that which pleased me best was, that my Lady Castlemaine stood over against us upon a piece of White Hall, where I glutted myself with looking on her.

Sunday 1 March 1662/63
… so I up into the house among the courtiers, seeing the fine ladies, and, above all, my Lady Castlemaine, who is above all, that only she I can observe for true beauty.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"This put us all into a great dumpe, and so we went to Creed’s new lodging in the Mewes, and there we found Creed with his parrot upon his shoulder, which struck Mr. Povy coming by just by the eye, very deep, which, had it hit his eye, had put it out. This a while troubled us..."

"Well, best of luck gentlemen..." Creed nods, shutting door. Povy as usual putting a generously kindly face on the matter, holding cloth to eye.

"Damn you, bird." Creed hisses. "It was the little sob you were supposed to go for..."

***

So the noble Coventry is not entirely above the game...And appears more aware of and amused by Pepys' machinations than the Diary had indicated previously. Also a major step...For the first time, he's used his position to encourage Jamie to move Pepys forward against (presumably) less capable men.

And Carteret not quite the supportive friend on this one, for whatever reasons. Perhaps the most interesting things here are that Pepys was able to outflank such quick-thinking, capable men as Carteret and Creed. And that Povy was so willing to settle so desired a position on him. Is he hoping an untitled fellow like Pepys will be easier to keep under thumb?

If so, a mistake on Tom's part... Though Carteret (if interested in the job personally) and others would probably have refused him any share.

***
"So home, and thither by my desire comes by and by Creed and lay with me..."

One cannot resist the contrast between Sam's innocent rendering of this line and what it would mean today.

***
Poor Barbara...But it must be hard work keeping Charlie amused. Plus Roger's in England now, which must at least create additional strain. Uneasy lies the body of England's chief courtesan.

Phil   Link to this

So FitzHarding and Brunkard scheme to take the job Povy is about to relinquish. They use, as their authority, a "former promise of the Duke's". These two fellows are pretty cunning men, and the lie so easily undone by a visit to the Duke of Yorke. Is it likely they underestimated Povy intelligence to check out their story, or is it possible the Duke may have given such a promise?

The pair, Brunkard & FitzHarding seem to behave sheepisly after being found out, and Pepys puts it down to "mischief" but there is no apparent punishment. You would wonder how often, in the Duke's name, this pair may have run the scam.

dirk   Link to this

Parrot

Painting by the Dutch artist Jan Steen, 1626-1679

http://histoforum.digischool.nl/luit/steen8.htm

The Dutch text explains about the symbolic value of many of the items on the painting. This conventional symbolism, although strange to us modern viewers, was standard in the 17th c. and readily understood by nearly everybody. Oysters and mussel shells are aphrodisiacs. The bird cage with opened door: a man seeing other women than his wife. A boy learing to smoke a pipe: sexual connotations. Wine: drunkenness. Grapes: germination. Parrot: stubbornness - the red colour refers to sexual prowess. Birds in gerneral stand for either the desire for something higher, or have a sexual meaning.

http://www.abcgallery.com/S/steen/steen.html
http://www.artcyclopedia.com/artists/steen_jan....

JWB   Link to this

With symbols Dirk alluded to in mind, it's Sam peering into Castelmayne's coach, who should have the parrot on his shoulder.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

Michael Robinson, do you suppose Lemuel Gulliver read Margaret Cavendish, ‘The Description Of A New World, Called The Blazing World’ (1666)? Her text sure sounds familiar. (Thanks for the link and the read.)

Ralph Berry   Link to this

Parrot

Great picture references by Dirk, and we think obesity is a modern problem!!

Michael Robinson   Link to this

" ... do you suppose Lemuel Gulliver read Margaret Cavendish, ... Her text sure sounds familiar."

I think the idea became a commonplace following Lucian of Samosata, the 'True History' parodying the voyage tales of Homer and Heroditas. With SP alone there is Chaucer's 'Parliament of Fowles' of which SP later owned a manuscript, (PL 2006), and SP had purchased his Chaucer in July 1664; or SP's acquaintance, John Wilkins, 'The Discovery of a World in the Moone' (1638) where one of Wilkins' concerns is how the descendants of Adam could have populated the planet. And of course, Cyrano de Bergerac's 'L’Autre Monde ou les états et empires de la lune.'(1657) -- where Cyrano is classified as a bird because he is a biped -- and 'L'histoire Des États Et Empires Du Soleil' (1662) where he is tried for the crimes of humanity by a court of birds and defends himself saying that he is not a human being but an ape.

chris   Link to this

These distinguished Londoners are unknowingly several months away from a terrible outbreak of plague, aren't they? What would be the state of play in the rats' nests in and around their houses, and what might have been done to avoid the coming catastrophe?

Michael Robinson   Link to this

"do you suppose Lemuel Gulliver read Margaret Cavendish"

I think Cavendish (Swift, and many others also) was influenced by Lucian, either directly or indirectly, for text and modern translation see:-
http://www.sacred-texts.com/cla/luc/true/index.htm
The 'True Story' was included with Francis Hickes selection of translations into English (Oxford 1634, rpr. 1664 with Jaspar Mayne's translation of the 'Dialogs'). Also there were numerous English editions in Latin translation; the Greek text had been in print from 1496. By the early/mid C 17th. speculation about 'other worlds'and their inhabitants had become a commonplace in educated circles.

I have no idea if Swift was familiar with Margaret Cavendish's writings but Gulliver, as both a general satire on human nature and on the politics of his day, is a far more elaborate and complex text.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Flea powder or a big fire, Chris...

It's interesting as Tomalin points out that Sam has already noted (during his sleepover with Dr. Clarke) fleas seem to ignore him. Maybe the little buggers just can't keep up with our little bugger.

Ruben   Link to this

Thank you, Michael for your erudite annotations.
May I say that every human art opus from the last 500 years has some precedent somewhere in the past. The same that happens in literature you see also in the graphic arts or in music. We are always building on the works of previous humans. This, I think, is the way of human endeavour we call civilization.

The Parrot: Considering the situation and characters involved, I could only think of Treasure Island. Captain Silver! and smile to myself.

Ruben   Link to this

Chris:
1664: Plague is God send (you can read this in the Bible, and you do not discuss the Bible, isnt it?) and there is nothing we can do against. Plague is good for you if send to your enemy. Bad if it comes to your place. There is no connection between fleas, rats and plague. Everyone knows that fleas are created on the spot by God to be where they are: on animals and people. Rats come and go and they are a nuisance. They also die of the Plague, as do cats and dogs. Rats spoil food. A good cat is a solution. If you are lost at sea, it is good you have rats on board, you may eat them as last resort.
Fleas and other insects are created specially in warm weather.
Now, you want to prevent Plague. This is a little presumptuous, considering the order of things created by God.
We have the Plague in London from Roman times, the last time it killed many thousands in one summer was a few decades ago. Every summer some will die of the Plague (usually the poor).
They are only 2 proven ways known to us to prevent a big outbreak: 1) Pray a lot 2) Quarantine the ships coming into port.
You know that if someone does not come to Church, at least on Sunday, he will be fined, first by society, then punished by God.
Etc, etc.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

September 1666...

"Hooke, you're absolutely sure about this? It does seem a bit extreme."

"Sire, I am convinced by my researches of the source of the infection. Sir, if you truly wish to prevent another upsurge in the plague this year, the city must be purified. It must be done for the...Greater Good. I believe the loss of life can be kept to a minimum."

"Think of the wide new boulevards we could create." Jamie notes. "Not to mention the impression our...er your gallant leadership in crisis would make."

"And not to mention the kickbacks from real-estate speculation as the city rebuilds." Arlington urges.

Charlie...Castlemaine, drooling at the thought...

Hmmn...Would be nice to have an unobstructed view of the Thames.

"Yes, for the Greater Good. And we can always blame it on the French, Dutch, and Papists." Charles happily agrees.

"Er, no offense, Jamie."

***

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