Wednesday 2 November 1664

Up betimes, and down with Mr. Castle to Redriffe, and there walked to Deptford to view a parcel of brave knees —[Knees of timber]— of his, which indeed are very good, and so back again home, I seeming very friendly to him, though I know him to be a rogue, and one that hates me with his heart. Home and to dinner, and so to my office all the afternoon, where in some pain in my backe, which troubled me, but I think it comes only with stooping, and from no other matter. At night to Nellson’s, and up and down about business, and so home to my office, then home to supper and to bed.

12 Annotations

Terry F   Link to this

Royal Correspondence
La.IV.34 fol. 107

The Duke of York (James II and VII) to Prince Rupert

Charles II agreeds [sic] to transferring men from the Company’s ships to the King’s ships now in harbour.

St James’s, 2 Nov. 1664.

http://www.lib.ed.ac.uk/about/pubs/lg51/guide/h...

Terry F   Link to this

Dirk Van de putte absent, here is another Carte Calendar entry

William Coventry to Sandwich
Written from: [St James's]

Date: 2 November 1664

Shelfmark: MS. Carte 75, fol(s). 241
Document type: Holograph

H.R.H. the Lord Admiral approves of the plan of drafting seamen (from the mercantile marine) into the King's ships.

Thanks Lord Sandwich for having lent him the 'Journal of the Council' [of State] for the year 1652.

Mentions a rumour of the loss of the ship Hound (Captain Fortescue) at sea, and fear it may be true.
http://www.bodley.ox.ac.uk/dept/scwmss/projects...

Michael Robinson   Link to this

"...lent him the ‘Journal of the Council’ [of State] for the year 1652."

Presumably of relevance as the year of the outbreak of the First Anglo-Dutch War.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...I seeming very friendly to him, though I know him to be a rogue, and one that hates me with his heart."

"TRUE! nervous, very, very dreadfully nervous I had been and am; but why WILL you say that I am mad? The disease had sharpened my senses, not destroyed, not dulled them. Above all was the sense of hearing acute. I heard all things in the heaven and in the earth. I heard many things in hell. How then am I mad? Hearken! and observe how healthily, how calmly, I can tell you the whole story."

"I think we can guess where poor Castle is now." Penn listening to the raving Pepys, notes to Minnes.

"Another one! Another rogue who hates me with his heart!!" Sam rages at Penn, straining against the four strong men holding him down...
***

cgs   Link to this

Tis why 'umans be such a success, unlike most of the animal kingdom of wysiwyg, humans use that brain and know that a smile gets the thy victim while the scowl gets nowt.
One usually one learns the hard way.
caveat emptor

"...I seeming very friendly to him, though I know him to be a rogue, and one that hates me with his heart...."

Terry F   Link to this

"Nellson, he that Whistler buys his bewpers of"

"and did there buy 5 pieces at their price, and am in hopes thereby to bring them down or buy ourselves all we spend of Nellson at the first hand." 26 October http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1664/10/26/

Nellson gives a discount to Young, who hopes to sell cloth for signal flags to the Navy Board at cost plus a little for Young and Whistler, "who find that I have quite overcome them in their business of flags, and now they come to intreat my favour, but I will be even with them." 31 October http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1664/10/31/

Australian Susan   Link to this

"...My tables - meet it is I set it down, That one may smile and smile and be a villain; At least I'm sure it may be so in Denmark" [and London?] Hamlet:Act I, Sc. 5, 105.

A. Hamilton   Link to this

Another long day for Mr. Sam

"Up betimes, and down with Mr. Castle"

Up and down

"At night to Nellson’s, and up and down about business,"

And up and down

"then home to supper and to bed."

And down at last.

Pedro   Link to this

Journal of the Council’ [of State] for the year 1652.”

For the Council of State during the time of Cromwell see…

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_Council_of...

Some info from the Council in 1652…

Dutch ambassadors warn the Council of State that the States General intends to increase the Dutch navy to defend against English aggression.

The Council of State demands compensation for wrongs committed by the Dutch against the English, including the murder of English merchants at Amboyna in the East Indies in 1623 and the failure of the Dutch authorities to punish the killers of Dr Dorislaus in 1649.

The Council of State sends Blake to disrupt the Dutch fishing fleet in the North Sea. Ayscue's squadron ordered to intercept Dutch merchant convoys in the Straits of Dover.

The council of state to the Dutch ambassadors.
Vol. ii. p. 410.

My lords,

Upon the 15th of March last, we delivered unto your excellencies a paper, whereby we did demand right and justice to be done to the people of this commonwealth in several particulars specified and expressed in that paper, and likewise satisfaction in what relates unto, and so highly concerns the honour of this commonwealth; since which we have received no answer at all thereunto; and in the paper of the 5/15 instant delivered in by your excellencies unto the commissioners appointed to meet with you, and by them reported unto us, your excellencies take no notice of those demands, your desires therein expressed relating only to our answer to your thirty six articles. We therefore find it necessary to remind your excellencies of the said demands, and that you would be pleased to give your answer thereunto; and to prevent all occasion or pretence of further delay, we have consented to a mutual conference, as is desired by your excellencies in your last paper, expecting thereupon to receive your full answer, as well to the said paper of demands, as to what we gave in answer to your thirty six propositions.
Signed in the name, and by order of the council of state appointed by authority of parliament.

Whitehall, 9th April 1652.
John Lisle, president. From: 'State Papers, 1652: January-June', A collection of the State Papers of John Thurloe, volume 1: 1638-1653 (1742), pp. 198-212. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?co.... Date accessed: 03 November 2007.

Pedro   Link to this

“Mentions a rumour of the loss of the ship Hound (Captain Fortescue) at sea, and fear it may be true.”

SPOILER?

For those concerned about Fortescue, he appears as Captain of the Loyal Merchant in the Fleet list of April 1665.


Pedro   Link to this

From the two letters posted by Terry.

"Charles II agreeds [sic] to transferring men from the Company’s ships to the King’s ships now in harbour."

"H.R.H. the Lord Admiral approves of the plan of drafting seamen (from the mercantile marine) into the King’s ships."

Here we see another form of pressing.

“Turnover”

Homeward bound seamen were a prime target for warships’ boats or specially hired tenders operating in the Medway, the Downs, or Spithead: seamen pressed in this way naturally rested being kept from their families and their pay, but the government considered it more acceptable to impose hardships on them than to disrupt the outward bound trade.

(Gentlemen and Tarpaulins by J D Davies)

Jesse   Link to this

“H.R.H. the Lord Admiral approves of the plan of drafting seamen (from the mercantile marine) into the King’s ships.” (From letter posted by Terry)

Not quite pulling them in off the streets. My first year of college was at the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy. We were commissioned as midshipmen in the Naval Reserve and there was no doubt about being called up in time of war.

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