Tuesday 17 May 1664

Slept well all night and lay long, then rose and wrote my letter to my father about Pall, as we had resolved last night. So to dinner and then to the office, finding myself better than I was, and making a little water, but not yet breaking any great store of wind, which I wonder at, for I cannot be well till I do do it. After office home and to supper and with good ease to bed, and endeavoured to tie my hands that I might not lay them out of bed, by which I believe I have got cold, but I could not endure it.

17 Annotations

Terry F   Link to this

"not yet breaking any great store of wind, which I wonder at, for I cannot be well till I do do it."

Evidently indeed a vital sign. As careful he is of his health, I imagine Pepys checking it daily, normally without reflection, quickly analyzing the "wind" for quantity and certain qualities (direction, velocity...ah, sorry).

cape henry   Link to this

At this point, Pall is about 24 years old, unattractive, and otherwise rough around the edges. I suspect that finding her a husband will prove an elusive objective. It is also worth noting that Pepys has recently written of his happiness and contentment on the domestic front. There can hardly be any question that the reintroduction of Pall into the mix would alter that.

cumsalisgrano   Link to this

Samuell be thinking? Pall has spent time contemplating the meadows, now she will heel nicely.
Pops has probably said plenty about the state of affairs , guessing that Pall be full of groans.

Todd Bernhardt   Link to this

"and making a little water, but not yet breaking any great store of wind"

More evidence -- to my mind, anyway -- that this is a kidney stone slowly working its painful way down Sam's urinary tract. He's noted several times his difficulty in urinating, and the pain in his back would lead him to think he needs to break wind -- but of course, it's not there to be broken (to Elizabeth's relief, I'd imagine).

Can you imagine tying your hands before falling asleep? I wouldn't be able to endure it, either.

Terry F   Link to this

Against dissident politics under cover of religion

The Conventicle Act of 1664 was passed by Parliament today, nemine contradicente.

"The Conventicle Act of 1664 was an Act of the Parliament of England (16 Charles II c. 4) that forbade religious assemblies of more than five people outside the auspices of the Church of England. This law was part of the programme of Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon, to discourage nonconformism and to strengthen the position of the Established Church. These prohibitions led many, such as the Covenanters, to vacate their parishes rather than submit to the new Episcopal authorities. Just as the ministers left so too did the congregations, following their old pastors to sermons on the hillside. From small beginnings these field assemblies-or conventicles-were to grow into major problems of public order for the government." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conventicle_Act_1664

(The text:) http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.asp?com...

The cost of non-conformity limned by Speaker of H.C.

"....Fanatics, Sectaries, and Non-conformists....are no Friends to the established Government either in Church or State; and if the old Rule hold true, Qui Ecclesia contradicit non est pacificus, we have great Reason to prevent their Growth, and to punish their Practice. To this Purpose, we have prepared a Bill against their frequenting of Conventicles, the Seed-plots and Nurseries of their Opinions, under Pretence of Religious Worship. The First Offence we have made punishable only with a small Fine of Five Pounds, or Three Months Imprisonment, and Ten Pounds for a Peer. The Second Offence with Ten Pounds, or Six Months Imprisonment, and Twenty Pounds for a Peer. But for the Third Offence, after a Trial by a Jury at the General Quarter Sessions or Assizes, and the Trial of a Peer by his Peers, the Party convicted shall be transported to some of Your Majesty's Foreign Plantations, unless he redeem himself by laying down One Hundred Pounds: Immedicabile Vulnus Ense rescindendum, ne Pars sincera trabatur."

From: 'House of Lords Journal Volume 11: 17 May 1664', Journal of the House of Lords: volume 11: 1660-1666, pp. 619-21. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.asp?com... Date accessed: 17 May 2007.

(Abbreviated text:) 225. First Conventicle Act

(1664, May 17. 16 Charles II. c. 4. 5 S. R. 516.)

http://home.freeuk.net/don-aitken/ast/c2.html#225

Australian Susan   Link to this

"endeavoured to tie my hands"

Oh, pleaase, please Mr G! This cries out for your unique brand of reinterpretation! (Sam as precursor/follower of the Marquis de Sade??) Anyway, it's almost impossible to tie one's own hands satisfactorily! I have this mental image of Sam struggling away holding rope in his teeth or endeavouring to use his toes whilst Elizabeth just stares ["what on earth is he up to now?"]

cumsalisgrano   Link to this

"SUSAN! SUSAN! Stop that ****** ****** **** ** ***'s **** I Cannot rite me Kandalarum"
"endeavoured to tie my hands that I might not lay them out of bed,"

Sam only mentions his upper maid or his lower one when they fail to do their work, otherwise they be a ghost, that never get a post.

Michael Robinson   Link to this

"endeavoured to tie my hands" Sam as precursor/follower of the Marquis de Sade??

Adds a new layer of meaning to SP's recent remarks about 'laced' gowns!

" ...my wife and I fell out about my not being willing to have her have her gowne laced, ..."
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1664/03/14/

in the afternoon my wife sent for me home, to see her new laced gowne, that is her gown that is new laced; and indeed it becomes her very nobly, and is well made. I am much pleased with it.
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1664/04/03/

Bert Mongoose   Link to this

"not yet breaking any great store of wind, which I wonder at, for I cannot be well till I do do it."

See Suetonius, Life of Claudius (32):
"He gave frequent and grand dinner parties, as a rule in spacious places, where six hundred guests were often entertained at one time. ... He is even said to have thought of an edict allowing the privilege of breaking wind quietly or noisily at table [edictum, quo veniam daret flatum crepitumque ventris in convivio emittendi], having learned of a man who ran some risk by restraining himself through modesty.

Evidently Sam's concern has quite an ancient history.

Wim van der Meij   Link to this

Can it be so cold in mid-may that Sam is afraid of catching a cold because of cold hands? (Sorry for three times 'cold' in one sentence.)

When my little sister was slowly ruining her teeth and jaws because of vehemently sucking on her fingers at night, my mother tied up het arms to the sides of her bed. It was successful after a few weeks, but I suppose she did not like it at all.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

I wonder if it's part of humoral theory...Hands away from the body's fire, losing to vitality to the air, that sort of thing. Though actually it does have some basis in our thermoregulation.

"Are they good and tight, Sam'l?"

"Oh, yes."

"Can't slip out?"

"Tight as a drum, thank ye, dearest."

"Pain better?"

"Considerably, praise God." "Praise God." "And yours?"

"Oh, much, thanks, Sam'l. But you're sure about the hands...?"

"Just fine, Bess...Bess? What are you...Bess?" Hee...Oh, my...Lord... "Bess, 17th century Englishmen are not used in such a manner by women!"

"That's what you think. Be grateful, little man...Especially that I don't bring sad ole Wight in here and make you watch."

"Hmmn...Point taken. Carry on..."

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"Sir, you asked me to be sure and come by to wake you, I...Oh, Lord!!...not again!!!" Hewer blanching, races for the stairs.

"Sam'l..." Bess sighs.

"I know, I really must speak to that boy. Now, could you please get off and untie me, dear?"

Hmmn...

"Bess?!..."

"I think not...As a loving wife, I fear I insist you remain in bed till you are recovered, darling. I'll get Will to take word. If Bessie can catch him."

"Damnit, Bess!"

"You'll thank me for it later, dear... Or maybe, right now..."

"Yes, well...Ummn...Oh, my...Well...Suppose I should be sure..."

"Absolutely sure. Say...You're not going to put this in your Diary, are you? You've promised, no details."

"Just my usual 'lay long in bed, pleasing myself with my wife' thing..."

"Very long...today."

"Exceptionally long...You know, I think my hands have gone numb. They look a little pale."

Bradford   Link to this

The main drawback to tying one's own hands is that if you succeed at all satisfactorily how can you get them untied again unassisted? To quote the late Mr. Zevon, "For my next trick I'll need a volunteer."

Pedro   Link to this

From the Carte Papers Carbonel to Sandwich...

Written from: Paris Date: 17 May 1664

Shelfmark: MS. Carte 223, fol(s). 262

Thanks the Earl for a most obliging letter, with which he has honoured the writer. Cannot permit Mr Sydney Montagu [in MS.: "vôtre cadet". Sydney Montagu assumed the name of Wortley, on his marriage with the heiress of Sir Francis Wortley] to go for England, without proffers of the writer's humble service.

(Summary from Cromwell's Earl by Ollard)

In August 1661 Sandwich's two eldest sons departed on the Grand Tour, while he was away at sea. Edward the eldest went on to do the full Tour, while Sydney came home in May 64...

The oldest child Lady Jemima had written in December. 'We all long for your safe return which we have been in great expectation of but now I hope it will be very sudingly."

The careful preservation of childish effusions among the graver papers of State shows how much their father valued and and enjoyed them. Brought up by so enchanting a mother it was hardly surprising that their family life should set a pattern of happiness and affection.

Pedro   Link to this

From the Carte Papers Carbonel to Sandwich...

Written from: Paris Date: 17 May 1664

Shelfmark: MS. Carte 223, fol(s). 262

Thanks the Earl for a most obliging letter, with which he has honoured the writer. Cannot permit Mr Sydney Montagu [in MS.: "vôtre cadet". Sydney Montagu assumed the name of Wortley, on his marriage with the heiress of Sir Francis Wortley] to go for England, without proffers of the writer's humble service.

(Summary from Cromwell's Earl by Ollard)

In August 1661 Sandwich's two eldest sons departed on the Grand Tour, while he was away at sea. Edward the eldest went on to do the full Tour, while Sydney came home in May 64...

The oldest child Lady Jemima had written in December. 'We all long for your safe return which we have been in great expectation of but now I hope it will be very sudingly."

The careful preservation of childish effusions among the graver papers of State shows how much their father valued and and enjoyed them. Brought up by so enchanting a mother it was hardly surprising that their family life should set a pattern of happiness and affection.

Pedro   Link to this

From the Carte Papers Carbonel to Sandwich...

Written from: Paris Date: 17 May 1664

Shelfmark: MS. Carte 223, fol(s). 262

Thanks the Earl for a most obliging letter, with which he has honoured the writer. Cannot permit Mr Sydney Montagu [in MS.: "vôtre cadet". Sydney Montagu assumed the name of Wortley, on his marriage with the heiress of Sir Francis Wortley] to go for England, without proffers of the writer's humble service.

(Summary from Cromwell's Earl by Ollard)

In August 1661 Sandwich's two eldest sons departed on the Grand Tour, while he was away at sea. Edward the eldest went on to do the full Tour, while Sydney came home in May 64...

The oldest child Lady Jemima had written in December. 'We all long for your safe return which we have been in great expectation of but now I hope it will be very sudingly."

The careful preservation of childish effusions among the graver papers of State shows how much their father valued and and enjoyed them. Brought up by so enchanting a mother it was hardly surprising that their family life should set a pattern of happiness and affection.

The Mollusc   Link to this

Pedro...
Pedro...!
Pedro!!!!

I think it can be a problem with some forum/blog programs, that if you don't close the window after sending, the software can misinterpret later keystrokes (but we will soon see if I too end up with multiple posts instead of one).

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