Monday 28 December 1663

Up and by coach to my Lord’s lodgings, but he was gone abroad, so I lost my pains, but, however, walking through White Hall I heard the King was gone to play at Tennis, so I down to the new Tennis Court; and saw him and Sir Arthur Slingsby play against my Lord of Suffolke and my Lord Chesterfield. The King beat three, and lost two sets, they all, and he particularly playing well, I thought. Thence went and spoke with the Duke of Albemarle about his wound at Newhall, but I find him a heavy dull man, methinks, by his answers to me. Thence to the King’s Head ordinary. and there dined, and found Creed there, but we met and dined and parted without any thing more than “How do you?” After dinner straight on foot to Mr. Hollyard’s, and there paid him 3l. in full for his physic and work to my wife … but whether it is cured for ever or no I cannot tell, but he says it will never come to anything, though it may be it may ooze now and then a little. So home and found my wife gone out with Will (whom she sent for as she do now a days upon occasion) to have a tooth drawn, she having it seems been in great pain all day, and at night came home with it drawn, and pretty well. This evening I had a stove brought me to the office to try, but it being an old one it smokes as much as if there was nothing but a hearth as I had before, but it may be great new ones do not, and therefore I must enquire further. So at night home to supper and to bed. The Duchesse of York is fallen sicke of the meazles.

12 Annotations

Bradford   Link to this

"The King beat three, and lost two sets, they all, and he particularly playing well, I thought."

What was the royal seventeenth-century equivalent of Nike or Adidas and tennis togs?

As for Pepys's "poor wife" and her "site of infection," the tactful doctor "says it will never come to anything, though it may be it may ooze now and then a little." There's a comfort.

Pedro   Link to this

"What was the royal seventeenth-century equivalent of Nike"

The King might punch the air, look to the heavens, thank the Goddess of Victory, and no doubt pocket a few quid in the process.

jeannine   Link to this

work to my wife ... but whether it is cured...

L&M fill in the blanks

work to my wife about her evill below; but whether it is cured ....

A. Hamilton   Link to this

The King beat three, and lost two sets,

Must have been awkward for Suffolk and Chesterfield playing the king. They had to lose, of course, but not so as to make it apparent they were trying to.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"So home and found my wife gone out with Will (whom she sent for as she do now a days upon occasion)..."

Poor Will, not even the faintest burst of jealously...I guess the Pepysian version of the Hitch-hiker's Guide would read:

William Hewer: Able...Mostly harmless.

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...to have a tooth drawn, she having it seems been in great pain all day, and at night came home with it drawn, and pretty well."

I wince just reading it...Ow! Poor, poor Bess. Makes me think of that scene in "Topsy-Turvy" where Jim Broadbent as W.S. Gilbert has to have a tooth yanked. Make that "Yeow!!!"

Todd Bernhardt   Link to this

re: "about her evill below"

Strange, Jeannine ... I would think Mr. Wheatley and the Victorians wouldn't hesitate to print something like that...

Dan Jenkins   Link to this

A Victorian acknowledging there was a "below," evill or otherwise?
For shame, Todd.

Michael Robinson   Link to this

... to play at Tennis ...

Real / court tennis rules, equipment etc:-
http://www.realtennis.gbrit.com/tennis.htm

An interactive real/court tennis court (requires "flash" player):-
http://www.realtennis.nl/realtennisbaan.swf

Wim van der Meij   Link to this

Was tennis 'court' derived from Hampton Court, or is -court- a word for just a stretch of land?

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"...but it being an old one it smokes as much as if there was nothing but a hearth as I had before, but it may be great new ones do not, and therefore I must enquire further."

The endless quest for the technical cutting edge...

Mary   Link to this

court.

A court is, primarily, an enclosed area or yard.

The 'court' of such establishments as Hampton Court, indicates a large building or set of buildings standing in a courtyard, hence a large house or castle (in early times a manorial house). OED.

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