Tuesday 10 November 1663

Up and to the office, where we sat till noon, and then to the Exchange, where spoke with several and had my head casting about how to get a penny and I hope I shall, and then home, and there Mr. Moore by appointment dined with me, and after dinner all the afternoon till night drawing a bond and release against to-morrow for T. Trice, and I to come to a conclusion in which I proceed with great fear and jealousy, knowing him to be a rogue and one that I fear has at this time got too great a hank —[hold]— over me by the neglect of my lawyers.

But among other things I am come to an end with Mr. Moore for a 32l., a good while lying in my hand of my Lord Privy Seal’s which he for the odd 7l. do give me a bond to secure me against, and so I got 25l. clear.

Then, he being gone, to the office and there late setting down yesterday’s remarkable discourses, and so home and to supper, late, and to bed.

The Queene, I hear, is now very well again, and that she hath bespoke herself a new gowne.


12 Annotations

Todd Bernhardt  •  Link

"But among other things I am come to an end with Mr. Moore for a 32l., a good while lying in my hand of my Lord Privy Seal's which he for the odd 7l. do give me a bond to secure me against, and so I got 25l. clear."

Could anyone help parse this? Thanks.

Cactus Wren  •  Link

"The Queen is well. We can tell, because she's ordering new dresses."

(Come to think of it, doesn't that apply to Our Diarist as well? We could tell he was pretty much recovered from his attack of the colic when he started ordering new clothes!)

aqua  •  Link

"...where spoke with several and had my head casting about how to get a penny..." Me lauds monies be 32 quid which be not rquired for the moment, Sam borrows it upon paying vigorish of 7quid. thereby saving Sam a hed ache of looking for a penny.

tel  •  Link

32l., a good while lying in my hand of my Lord Privy Seal's

£7 would be an enormous interest to pay for a loan of £25. I suspect that this money has been forgotten by the Lord Privy Seal and that Moore and Sam are splitting it between them, having agreed a cover story in case it is ever remembered.

Pedro  •  Link

On this day the 10th November 1663...

The Duke of York signs the instructions for the second expedition of Holmes to the West Coast of Africa, which had been drafted by Coventry the Secretary of the Guinney Company.

I don't think that it is a spoiler, so for the instructions see background...

http://www.pepysdiary.com/encyclopedia/930/

Terry F  •  Link

"setting down yesterday's remarkable discourses"

explaining why yesterday's discourse with Blackborne, which lasted until 11 pm - after his usual bed-time - was set down in two parts, the second following his going "to bed" -

Rgemini  •  Link

"... I am come to an end with Mr. Moore for a 32l., a good while lying in my hand of my Lord Privy Seal's which he for the odd 7l. do give me a bond to secure me against, and so I got 25l. clear. "

I think this means Mr Moore would accept the risk of having to find the whole £32 if demanded by the Lord Privy Seal. Sam pays Mr Moore £7 and in return has a legal document saying Mr Moore owes the money, so Sam is £25 less in debt.

D J Clark  •  Link

"But among other things I am come to an end with Mr. Moore for a 32l..."

The L&M edition has a note referring to the entry for 3rd September 1660.

Bill  •  Link

“I fear has at this time got too great a hank —[hold]— over me by the neglect of my lawyers”

"For if you side for love or money,
With crowns that have so oft undone ye,
The dev'l will get a hank upon ye."
Hudibras Redivivus, part vi., 1706 (quoted in Nares's "Glossary").
---Wheatley, 1893.

A HANK. a habit, custom, or propensity of Mind.
---An universal etymological English dictionary. N. Bailey, 1724.

Chris Squire UK  •  Link

Re: ‘ . . had my head casting about how to get a penny . . ‘

‘cast, v. < Middle English . .
. . 60. a. Hunting. intr. Of dogs (or huntsmen): To spread out and search in different directions for a lost scent.
1704 Dict. Rusticum at Hare-hunting, So will they [Greyhounds] soon learn to cast for it at a doubling or default . .

b. transf. and fig. to cast about one: to look about (mentally).
. . 1867 W. D. Howells Ital. Journeys 277 Spinabello cast about him to find a suitable husband for her.’

‘to cast about
. . 3. To go this way and that in search for game, a lost scent, etc., orig. a hunting locution. Cf. 60.
. . 1607 E. Topsell Hist. Fovre-footed Beastes 141 Dogges..will cast about for the game, as a disputant doth for the truth.
. . 1879 R. L. Stevenson Trav. with Donkey 166, I began to cast about for a place to camp in.’

…………..
Re: ‘ . . I fear has at this time got too great a hank over me by the neglect of my lawyers . . ’

‘hank, n. < Norse . .
. . 4. fig. a. A restraining or curbing hold; a power of check or restraint: esp. in to have a hank on or over any one. Now rare or dial.
1613 T. Potts Wonderfull Discov. Witches sig. P4, The said Witches..had then in hanck a child of Michael Hartleys.
1706 G. Farquhar Recruiting Officer ii. ii. 18 'Twill give me such a hank upon her Pride . . ‘

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