Sunday 1 February 1662/63

(Lord’s day). Up and to church, where Mr. Mills, a good sermon, and so home and had a good dinner with my wife, with which I was pleased to see it neatly done, and this troubled me to think of parting with Jane, that is come to be a very good cook. After dinner walked to my Lord Sandwich, and staid with him in the chamber talking almost all the afternoon, he being not yet got abroad since his sickness. Many discourses we had; but, among others, how Sir R. Bernard is turned out of his Recordership of Huntingdon by the Commissioners for Regulation, &c., at which I am troubled, because he, thinking it is done by my Lord Sandwich, will act some of his revenge, it is likely, upon me in my business, so that I must cast about me to get some other counsel to rely upon. In the evening came Mr. Povey and others to see my Lord, and they gone, my Lord and I and Povey fell to the business of Tangier, as to the victualling, and so broke up, and I, it being a fine frost, my boy lighting me I walked home, and after supper up to prayers, and then alone with my wife and Jane did fall to tell her what I did expect would become of her since, after so long being my servant, she had carried herself so as to make us be willing to put her away, and desired God to bless [her], but bid her never to let me hear what became of her, for that I could never pardon ingratitude. So I to bed, my mind much troubled for the poor girl that she leaves us, and yet she not submitting herself, for some words she spoke boldly and yet I believe innocently and out of familiarity to her mistress about us weeks ago, I could not recall my words that she should stay with me. This day Creed and I walking in White Hall garden did see the King coming privately from my Lady Castlemaine’s; which is a poor thing for a Prince to do; and I expressed my sense of it to Creed in terms which I should not have done, but that I believe he is trusty in that point.

21 Annotations

Bradford   Link to this

"bid her never to let me hear what became of her, for that I could never pardon ingratitude."

You mean if Jane gets a better place, it would be ungracious to let you know your prediction was wrong, causing you to repent even more of sending her away?
Maybe she's not quite gone for good yet.

jeannine   Link to this

Bradford, I was confused by that too but was wondering, based on the recent ugly departure of Sarah (gossiping all the way to Penn's) that maybe Sam wants to be sure that she is in a place that has no "relation" to his household????? It seems sadly harsh as Jane has been with them for awhile and has been a good servant overall. Maybe others have a clearer take on this than I.

Bob T   Link to this

bid her never to let me hear what became of her, for that I could never pardon ingratitude.”
Sam has told her that once she is gone, he never wants to hear from her again, because he can never forgive what she has done. I wonder if he gave her a reference, because she would be unemployable without one.

A.Hamilton   Link to this

Domestic disturbances

Pepys household in turmoil? On Dec. 27
Pepys writes he is determined to dismiss Wayneman Birch, brohter to Jane and "my boy." On Dec. 31 he notes that Jane has been impertinent and will be dismissed. I have found no other references. Has Wayneman been dismissed, and if so who is the new "boy"? Has there been any other indication of Pepys's displeasure with Jane? Her biography suggests she continues to serve. Does this mean Pepys threatens to can his servants but doesn't actually do so?

Todd Bernhardt   Link to this

I think Jeannine has this one pegged. The relationship with Sarah ended badly, and Sam is telling Jane in this entry that he doesn't want their relationship to end the same way.

Furthermore, it sounds as if he's giving her another chance, but she won't submit "herself, for some words she spoke boldly and yet I believe innocently and out of familiarity to her mistress about us weeks ago."

Mr. Hamilton asks a good question, but I doubt Sam would have put Wayneman away and gotten a new boy without writing about it. I remember him writing about an arrangement to send Wayneman away, but I forget the timing (and am too lazy to look it up) ... certainly it must be in the (near?) future. Odd that they would send Jane away before Wayneman, but perhaps because she's older they know she can fend for herself (and then some!)

A. Hamilton   Link to this

Sam dismisseth the servants

Saturday 27 December 1662

Up, and while I am dressing I sent for my boy’s brother, William, that lives in town here as a groom, to whom and their sister Jane I told my resolution to keep the boy no longer. So upon the whole they desire to have him stay a week longer, and then he shall go.

Wednesday, 31 December 1662

...My family is myself and wife, William, my clerk; Jane, my wife’s upper mayde, but, I think, growing proud and negligent upon it: we must part, which troubles me; Susan, our cook-mayde, a pretty willing wench, but no good cook; and Wayneman, my boy, who I am now turning away for his naughty tricks....

Robert Gertz   Link to this

"words she spoke boldly and yet I believe innocently..." Anger over Wayneman's treatment seeping out I would imagine.

***
"...and I expressed my sense of it to Creed in terms which I should not have done, but that I believe he is trusty in that point."

Sure, Sam. Absolutely. Who wouldn't trust dear old Creed with one's very life...Or position...A plum job Creed's no doubt had his jealous eye on since the day it went to Sam.

And a future entry...?

"Was much troubled in my mind for thought of my folly in speaking to Creed as I did the other day..."

Well, perhaps things will be ok if Creed still wants that extra pay bill to slide through...

***
"Ah, Jamie. Bit of a task for you, brother. Minor spot of difficulty, only meself to blame. I was seen...Well, shall we say..."

"Not again, your Majesty."

"Well...Why silly people have to be out and about in the gardens at all times of the day, I'll never know. Anyway, Jamie...A couple of fellows caught me coming from La Palmer's and... See, I think I recognized one of your fellows...What was the name? Ummn, Phiffs? Fiffs? Something like that. Can you be a good fellow and have him put away somewhere? Far away?"

"Hmmn. Can't think of anyone...Well, there is old Pipps, the gardener's assistant. Short fellow, dyes his hair to look young?"

"Yes, the very fellow, I'm sure. Arrange it, will you? Far, far away. Can't have poor Kat bothered with silly gossip and all that."

"He'll be off to Virginia on the next boat, your Majesty."

"There's a good fellow, dear old Jamie." Pat on shoulder.

Next day...

"But Your Highness, I..."

"Pipps, His Majesty is pleased to entrust you with this position in Virginia. There you can study the New World's astonishing collection of new flora and report back...That is to say by courier, your mission is indefinite...To us on your findings."

"But sir? I'm only gardener's assistant."

"Then thank God for a grand promotion, Pipps. You're on your way to success, man." ("Get him to the boat"...low hiss to guards)

Hmmn? Wonder what's up with old Pipps? Sam eyes the protesting Pipps being dragged off to permanent exile among the savages of Virginia.

in Aqua Scripto   Link to this

"...it being a fine frost, my boy lighting me I walked home, and after supper up to prayers..." All those luverly iced up puddles, shining with a pretty twinkle, with his hands stuffed in a muff and exhaling white frosty droplets, while his lad be holding up his pyrotecnics of tar lace wormwood twigs, hoping his hand will stay warm, while he dothe try to stay upright on slithering glass like leftovers from some unknown upper window.
So who be the Lad?

Terry F   Link to this

And there is 8 January 1662/63

"before I sent my boy out with them, I beat him for a lie he told me, at which his sister, with whom we have of late been highly displeased, and warned her to be gone, was angry, which vexed me, to see the girl I loved so well, and my wife, should at last turn so much a fool and unthankful to us....[before] “The Adventures of Five Hours,” at the Duke’s house...made my wife to get her ready, though we were forced to send for a smith, to break open her trunk, her mayde Jane being gone forth with the keys, and so we went; and though early, were forced to sit almost out of sight, at the end of one of the lower forms, so full was the house." http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1663/01/08/

in Aqua Scripto   Link to this

Another lesson in keeping Mum about those thoughts that be PiC.
"...Many discourses we had; but, among others, how Sir R. Bernard is turned out of his Recordership of Huntingdon by the Commissioners for Regulation, &c., at which I am troubled,..."

Terry F   Link to this

Has Wayneman been dismissed, and if so who is the new “boy”?

The L&M Index has it that Wayneman has not been dismissed, so Sam has......bluffed.

Australian Susan   Link to this

Sam and Creed seeing the King and Sam's reaction.

Maybe Sam thought Charles could or should restrain himself from such open adultery on a Sunday.

dirk   Link to this

The Rev. Josselin has the following to say about the *frost* -- under the somewhat enigmatic heading "Feb: 1. 8" (it looks as if he filled in the date of Feb 1, but then only wrote the entry on Feb 8)

"God good to us in manifold mercies a most bitter violent frost yet continues and increases, somewhat calm, a snow covering the ground. gods worship is most sadly neglected, and now I fear the use of common prayer will cause a rent and separation of divers asserters of ordinances. god settle and establish me."

Mary   Link to this

The encounter with the king.

Perhaps Sam feels that it would be more seemly for Castlemaine to sneak in and out of the Royal apartments, rather than vice versa.

Firenze   Link to this

Tousled and yawning king: it was certainly protocol for royal wives - and possibly royal mistresses? - to be visited rather than visit. Since you could turn up at the royal bedside and find your space already occupied.

A. Hamilton   Link to this

Phil

Terry's find (Jan.8 1663) regarding Jane and Wayneman should be added to the references section under each name (and in the household folder) as should today's discovery that Sam has been bluffing -- or is too soft-hearted to act against Jane and her little brother.

David A. Smith   Link to this

"In terms which I should not have done, but that I believe he is trusty in that point."
Interesting that Sam believes he is close enough to the levers of power that if his candid comments were heard, he might suffer for it. A very strong indicator of his rising status.

JWB   Link to this

Note the parallel:
"...yet she not submitting herself, for some words she spoke boldly..."
&
"...expressed my sense of it to Creed in terms which I should not have done..."

Is there truth in this artfulness?

slangist   Link to this

Robert's Fine Playlet on Pipps the Undergardner:
Caused a grim laugh at the lofty manner in which an aristo can dispose of the living, livelihood, and indeed life, of a dependent. Now they're economic instead of inherited positions with such power, but surely not much has changed. The mistake of a doddering superior's getting revenge on the wrong upstart underling much informs the acerbic comic novels of Evelyn Waugh, an anachronistic parallelism I am happy to off-topically note...

jeannine   Link to this

"Since you could turn up at the royal bedside and find your space already occupied"
Firenze-great comment and sadly true for Queen Catherine. There is an incident in her life where she did show up one morning at the King's bed to speak with him and she found a ladies shoe on the floor. Catherine made a polite comment that she would excuse herself for a moment so that "the little fool" hiding behind the curtain could get herself dressed and out of there (via the "back stairs" no doubt)so that she could speak to her husband. Catherine also around this time, used to wait outside HER OWN closet and clear her throat before entering so that if her faithless husband was fooling around with someone in there (as he was known to do) they'd have time to get proper before she entered.

Australian Susan   Link to this

I admire Catherine more and more.

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