Sunday 6 April 1662

(Lord’s day). By water to White Hall, to Sir G. Carteret, to give him an account of the backwardness of the ships we have hired to Portugall: at which he is much troubled. Thence to the Chappell, and there, though crowded, heard a very honest sermon before the King by a Canon of Christ Church, upon these words, “Having a form of godliness, but denying,” &c. Among other things, did much insist upon the sin of adultery: which methought might touch the King, and the more because he forced it into his sermon, methinks, besides his text. So up and saw the King at dinner; and thence with Sir G. Carteret to his lodgings to dinner, with him and his lady, where I saluted her, and was well received as a stranger by her; she seems a good lady, and all their discourse, which was very much, was upon their sufferings and services for the King. Yet not without some trouble, to see that some that had been much bound to them, do now neglect them; and others again most civil that have received least from them: and I do believe that he hath been a good servant to the King. Thence to walk in the Park, where the King and Duke did walk round the Park. After I was tired I went and took boat to Milford stairs, and so to Graye’s Inn walks, the first time I have been there this year, and it is very pleasant and full of good company. When tired I walked to the Wardrobe, and there staid a little with my Lady, and so by water from Paul’s Wharf (where my boat staid for me), home and supped with my wife with Sir W. Pen, and so home and to bed.

21 Annotations

Clement   Link to this

"Having a form of godliness, but denying the power thereof: from such turn away."
2Timothy, 3:5

Or, the true source of piety is God, not one's own virtue.

Whenever Sam mentions the King's witness to a sermon upon moral conduct he can't help but hope it would "touch" HRH. Charles, on the other hand, yawned.

Glyn   Link to this

Gray's Inn Walks would have been another 20-minute stroll uphill from the river: he's taking a lot of exercise on what was presumably a fine Spring day.

So Charles is not yet married but is already being publicly warned against adultery; I wonder how much the bride knows about all of this.

dirk   Link to this

John Evelyn heard a different sermon today:

"Our Viccar on 5. Eph: 14: I receivd the B: Sacrament. Being of the vestery, in the afternoone, we ordered that the Communion Table should be set (as usualy) Altarwise; with a decent raile before it, according as formerly, before the Rebellion:"

Robert Gertz   Link to this

Wonder if the Canon of Christ Church was perhaps a friend of Mr. Palmer's? Bit risky to stick one's neck out with such a sermon even before the King's had a chance to marry...

dirk   Link to this

Eph. 5:14 (Evelyn cont'd)

"Wherefore he saith, Awake thou that sleepest, and arise from the
dead, and Christ shall give thee light."

vicenzo   Link to this

".... By water to White Hall....the Chappell, .......Thence to walk in the Park, where the King and Duke did walk round the Park...."
Can be seen here, his olde stomping ground. [no mention of poping in to check up on his tenant?]

http://www.motco.com/map/81002/SeriesSearchPlat...

PHE   Link to this

Grays Inn Gardens
For a photo, see:
http://www.smartgroups.com/pictures/openpicture...

Mary   Link to this

The Canon of Christ Church.

Dr. Jasper Mayne, who was also chaplain to the king.

Rex Gordon   Link to this

2 Timothy ...

The passage from which Dr Mayne's text is taken demonstrates just what a cheeky sermon this must have been:

"This know also, that in the last days perilous times shall come.
2 For men shall be lovers of their own selves, covetous, boasters, proud, blasphemous, disobedient to parents, unthankful, unholy,
3 Without natural affection, trucebreakers, false accusers, incontinent, fierce, despisers of those that are good,
4 Traitors, heady, highminded, lovers of pleasures more than lovers of God,
5 Having a form of godliness, but denying the power thereof: from such turn away."

Talk about touching the King! Maybe it was a good thing for Dr Mayne that Charles didn't take sermons seriously.

Araucaria   Link to this

Glyn, re adultery:

Recall that in those times that they used the biblical definition of adultery -- a married woman not being faithful to her husband. The converse was not observed because wives were at that time regarded as form of property. Charles was having an affair with another man's wife. His own marital status was not important, what mattered was that he was violating the property of another man.

So warnings about adultery in the sermon were perfectly timely and appropriate. And perhaps the cleric was implying that if Charles wanted his own union to be respected, he should respect those of others first.

(Note my new annotation ID and new spam-safe email address. I formerly posted as 'upper_left_hand_corner')

David Ross McIrvine   Link to this

Why Sam thinks adultery is forced into the sermon as an issue is beyond me: St. Paul refers explicity to these men as seducers of women in the original passage from the Holy Bible of 1611, at
2 Timothy 3:6-7

"3:1: This know also, that in the last days perilous times shall come.
3:2: For men shall be lovers of their own selves, covetous, boasters, proud, blasphemers, disobedient to parents, unthankful, unholy,
3:3: Without natural affection, trucebreakers, false accusers, incontinent, fierce, despisers of those that are good,
3:4: Traitors, heady, highminded, lovers of pleasures more than lovers of God;
3:5: Having a form of godliness, but denying the power thereof: from such turn away.
3:6: For of this sort are they which creep into houses, and lead captive silly women laden with sins, led away with divers lusts,
3:7: Ever learning, and never able to come to the knowledge of the truth."

And St. Paul later calls them seducers
(2 Timothy 3:13):

"3:12: Yea, and all that will live godly in Christ Jesus shall suffer persecution.
3:13: But evil men and seducers shall wax worse and worse, deceiving, and being deceived.
3:14: But continue thou in the things which thou hast learned and hast been assured of, knowing of whom thou hast learned them;
3:15: And that from a child thou hast known the holy scriptures, which are able to make thee wise unto salvation through faith which is in Christ Jesus."

Jesse   Link to this

"where I saluted her"

I wonder if some formality was involved or whether it was just polite intercourse?

john lauer   Link to this

"where I saluted her" What would now be called a toast?

vicenzo   Link to this

Also J. Evelyn mentions the separating the hoi polloi from the Altar by restoring the Altar Rail:
Being in the Vestery, in the afternoone, we ordered that the Communion Table should be set (as usualy) Altarwise: with a decent raile before it,according as formerly, before the Rebellion."

Mary   Link to this

"where I saluted her"

Sam is being introduced for the first time to the wife of a superior. His 'salute' would certainly involve removing his hat (if he were wearing one) and perhaps a slight bow or at least a nod of the head; the modern comparison being a polite "How do you do?" accompanied by a handshake, rather than a breezy "Hi!" and a casual wave of the hand.

vicenzo   Link to this

'where I saluted her': It would be A ritual, long forgotton by most of the modern era. Sam, not yet one of Betters, would not upset the apple cart by being a Quaker. Humble speech and all outward signs of Respect. Lady Elizabeth Being a Royalist and from a long line of Manorly peoples, would demand the utmost of Civil behaviour, including genuflecting and removal of head gear if he was hatless[ doubt it] then forelock be moved.
see page 220 Liza Picard on Etiquitte , [the ticket to the betters]see Pepis diary 14 Aug '66

vicenzo   Link to this

Oh! how we forget:"....to Westminster Abbey, where we saw Dr. Frewen translated to the Archbishoprick of York. Here I saw the Bishops of Winchester, Bangor, Rochester, Bath and Wells, and Salisbury, all in their habits, in King Henry Seventh's chappell. But, Lord! at their going out, how people did most of them look upon them as strange creatures, and few with any kind of love or respect…”
http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1660/10/04/

Pedro   Link to this

"I wonder how much the bride knows about all of this."

An interesting question at this point in the diary. One person that knew all about Charlie was her mother Luisa, who had tracked his progress while in exile. Catherine had only come out of her secular upbringing when the marriage treaty had been signed, and took her place in the Portuguese court. She was still protected from the outside world, but at some stage before her departure her mother warned her "not to even consent to the mention of the name of Castlemaine/Palmer in her presence."

Pedro   Link to this

On the 6 April 62...

While De Ruyter was negotiating at Algiers, Lawson appeared in pursuit of 6 Algerian pirates. He allowed them to pass through his fleet to the annoyance of Lawson.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"I do believe that [ Carteret ] hath been a good servant to the King."

Particularly as Governor of Jersey (1643-51) , base of the royalist navy. (L&M note)

Terry Foreman   Link to this

"...by water from Paul’s Wharf (where my boat staid for me),..."

The office boat. Watermen were not allowed to ply for hire on Sundays. (L&M)

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