Monday 20 May 1661

At home all the morning; paid 50l. to one Mr. Grant for Mr. Barlow, for the last half year, and was visited by Mr. Anderson, my former chamber fellow at Cambridge, with whom I parted at the Hague, but I did not go forthwith him, only gave him a morning draft at home. At noon Mr. Creed came to me, and he and I to the Exchange, and so to an ordinary to dinner, and after dinner to the Mitre, and there sat drinking while it rained very much. Then to the office, where I found Sir Williams both, choosing of masters for the new fleet of ships that is ordered to be set forth, and Pen seeming to be in an ugly humour, not willing to gratify one that I mentioned to be put in, did vex me. We sat late, and so home. Mr. Moore came to me when I was going to bed, and sat with me a good while talking about my Lord’s business and our own and so good night.

8 Annotations

dirk   Link to this

"but I did not go forthwith him"

More logically would be "forth with". This was probably what Sam wrote. Shorthand transcription error?

Australian Susan   Link to this

"seeming to be in an ugly humour"
Did Sir William think Sam should have been in the office helping out with the choosing instead of drinking with Creed? Maybe that's why he didn't seem inclined to take up Sam's suggestion and was in a bad mood.

Glyn   Link to this

Captain Ferrers must have known that today was the day for the selection of the captains - I wonder if he was promoted or not.

A. De Araujo   Link to this

"seeming to be in an ugly humour" Sir William seems to be in an ugly humour quite often; remember when he threw that guy from the horse sometime ago?

vicente   Link to this

Wm. Pen Ill humour: Sam was not yet in the position of puting in his 2 [tuppence] pennyworth yet. Sam is expecting a lot, when these old salts pick their sailing team. Was it not Batten battening down the Louts.

JWB   Link to this

Vexed Pepys, vexed reader...
"Mr. Moore came to me when I was going to bed, and sat with me a good while talking about my Lord's business and our own …” “Our own” business, now that’s vexing not to know what sort of business that would be. I’m assuming they’re scheming for private gain with the fleet assembling, crews & supplies taken on, foreign parts cruised, etc.-the opportunities must have seemed endless to the late night duo, double vexing.

helena murphy   Link to this

Had Sam had the benefit of having read Robert Louis Stevenson or Joseph Conrad he would be more in tune to Sir William's brusque nuances of behaviour.

Terry Foreman   Link to this

" paid 50l. to one Mr. Grant for Mr. Barlow"

L&M; note John Graunt, the pioneer social statistician (see Phil's link), had received power of attorney from William Petty, Barlow's agent.

Log in to post an annotation.

If you don't have an account, then register here.