Tuesday 20 October 1668

Up, and to the office all the morning, and then home to dinner, having this day a new girl come to us in the room of Nell, who is lately, about four days since, gone away, being grown lazy and proud. This girl to stay only till we have a boy, which I intend to keep when I have a coach, which I am now about. At this time my wife and I mighty busy laying out money in dressing up our best chamber, and thinking of a coach and coachman and horses, &c.; and the more because of Creed’s being now married to Mrs. Pickering; a thing I could never have expected, but it is done about seven or ten days since, as I hear out of the country. At noon home to dinner, and my wife and Harman and girl abroad to buy things, and I walked out to several places to pay debts, and among other things to look out for a coach, and saw many; and did light on one for which I bid 50l., which do please me mightily, and I believe I shall have it. So to my tailor’s, and the New Exchange, and so by coach home, and there, having this day bought “The Queene of Arragon” play, I did get my wife and W. Batelier to read it over this night by 11 o’clock, and so to bed.


17 Annotations

Terry Foreman  •  Link

Keeping up with the Creeds.

"thinking of a coach and coachman and horses, &c.; and the more because of Creed's being now married to Mrs. Pickering; a thing I could never have expected"

This possibility has nettled Pepys for awhile. 24 April 1665: Lady Sandwich told Pepys privily of Creed's designs on Betty Pickering, and registered her own coolness to the idea, but, Pepys judged "not so severe as it ought to have been ," and there are more details here: http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1665/04/24/

And this 29 July: "Mr. Swan, my old acquaintance...tells me, for a certainty, that Creed is to marry Betty Pickering, and that the thing is concluded, which I wonder at, and am vexed for." http://www.pepysdiary.com/diary/1668/07/29/

Terry Foreman  •  Link

Ormond to Lord Andover
Written from: Whitehall
Date: 20 October 1668

Will. Sydenham tells the writer that his Lordship, when last in town, was pleased to inquire where the Duke was. He can answer that, setting duty apart, he was where he cannot have so much pleasure, as he should have in his Lordship's conversation. His days of hunting are wearing out apace, & those of talking (said to be the old man's exercise) grow on as fast. ...

http://www.rsl.ox.ac.uk/dept/scwmss/projects/cart…

___

So true, so true.

Andrew Hamilton  •  Link

"At this time my wife and I mighty busy laying out money in dressing up our best chamber, and thinking of a coach and coachman and horses, &c.; and the more because of Creed’s being now married to Mrs. Pickering;"

More evidence (if needed) of Sam's competitive streak. Sir William Penn put him on his professional mettle, now Creed challenges his social standing.

Claire  •  Link

In an odd kluge of old and new that is only possible in the era of the internet, I am excited that Pepys is getting a coach and decorating his "best chamber," and I am wishing he could post photos.

Larry Hill  •  Link

Shows how little things have changed over the centuries. We still value material possessions a little too much and we are always in a rush to keep up with the neighbours next door!!

Ian Greenwood  •  Link

'...having this day bought “The Queene of Arragon” play, I did get my wife and W. Batelier to read it over this night by 11 o’clock, and so to bed.'

Home play-readings, with the three taking all the parts? Did he often do this?

Robert Gertz  •  Link

Hmmn...Pickering. Now Sir Gilbert Pickering was the one in trouble at Restoration, having been a judge at the trial of Charles I, saved because he didn't sign Charles I's death warrant and Montagu was his brother-in-law. This unusually socially mobile marriage has a certain smell of possible blackmail...Though perhaps Creed honestly won points by offering his services to the Pickerings and claiming to still remain somewhat true to the Cromwellian cause in secret?

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"Creed’s being now married to Mrs. Pickering"

L&M note Betty Pickering was Sandwich'es niece; she and John Creed had become married at Tichmarsh, Northants., on 6 October. Pepys greatly resented Creed's 'devlish presumption' in aspiring to her.

Terry Foreman  •  Link

"I walked out to several places to pay debts, and among other things to look out for a coach, and saw many; and did light on one for which I bid 50l."

L&M report in 1665 Sir Edward Harley paid £38 for the cheapest coaxch and harness he could buy in London: HMC, Portland, iii.290.

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

Oct. (20). 1668
Barbados.
#1857. Speech of Gov. Wm. Lord Willoughby to the Grand Jury of Barbados.

Refers to the discomposed minds, cloudy countenances, and universal distraction of affairs on his arrival among them;
his success in preserving them to a harbour secure and peaceful;
and the better understandings between the people.

Next to his own reputation he prefers their good and quiet far above any revenue.
'Tis possible he has not pleased every man's humor, but he will in all things endeavor to please all, and with their compliance he mistakes much if any person miss his proper station.
Kicking at every power has been a sore evil in Barbados, which he hopes is now shut out of doors;
as also private animosity, the bane of the general good.

Is now going to give account to the King, his master, how he has spent his time among them:
some have endeavored to do him prejudice and wound his honor, but he will not seek revenge, but only his own justification;
for his desire is that his good name may live among them.

Speaks to the whole country while he seeks their testimonies of him:
how some few have already witnessed for him the petition before the Council Board and other clamors may easily inform them;
but what makes him leave them with the most contentedness is the knowledge of his own integrity and just dealings.

Confesses they have done things for his Majesty's sake and service, to the extent of all modest expectation, who will acknowledge their obliging kindness to Sir Tobias Bridge's regiment.

The laws of England are too abstruse, and those of this country too uncertain, for his understanding, and this sad consideration forces him earnestly to conjure them, for their own honor and safety and the good of posterity, to lose no time to establish themselves and their interests by such secure, certain, and intelligible laws as may remove their distractions forever.

If they will present all the violations of the laws, he will punish them, and herein he doubts not their concurrence according to their duties.
2-½ pp. [Col. Papers, Vol. XXIII., No. 65.]
---
William, Lord WILLOUGHBY, 6th Baron of Parham MP (1616 – 1673), Gov. Barbados (1666 – 1673)
---
Tobias Bridge fought for Parliament in the English Civil Wars, served the Lord Protector Oliver Cromwell during the Interregnum, and after the Restoration he served Charles II.
A year after he was knighted in 1666, Col. Sir Tobias Bridge was sent to Barbados with his regiment. In 1672 he commanded the local land forces against Tobago in one of the many wars over that island. In 1674 he was admitted to the council of Barbados.
He probably died in Bridgetown, the capital of Barbados which was named after him, but no record has been found of the date.
https://www.oxforddnb.com/view/10.1093/ref:odnb/9… (you need a subscription)

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

"This girl to stay only till we have a boy, which I intend to keep when I have a coach,"

"Nell, Pepys' cookmaid 2 Sept. 1667-20 Oct. 1668, having grown lazy she left."

Tell me how this works out for you, Pepys.

San Diego Sarah  •  Link

The volume of Domestic State Papers covering correspondence from Oct. 1668 to Dec. 1669 is at
https://play.google.com/books/reader?id=vik5AQAAM…

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Oct. 20 1668.
Hull
Jos. Blaydes to the Navy Commissioners.

Prays payment of money disbursed by his father, who had no salary;
the creditors will no longer wait for their money, as they sold the goods cheap.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 248, No. 20.]

@@@
Oct. 20 1668.
Hull
Jos. Blaydes to Pepys.

Desires he will do what he can in obtaining payment of the money owing, being in great strait and necessity.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 248, No. 21.]

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Oct. 20 168.
Navy Treasury Office
James Pugh and Phineas Pett to the Navy Commissioners.

Crave their commands, there having been but two books kept at the pay of ships, one of which is sealed up at the Navy Office, but two are necessary for making up of the accounts.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 248, No. 22.]

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Oct. 20 1668.
Plymouth
Hugh Salesbury to Williamson.

Your colt shall be taken care of, and brought up by easy journeys, so as not to
wrong him.

The Antelope and Mary Rose have sailed for the Thames.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 248, No. 24.]

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Oct. 20 1668.
Earl of Nottingham to Williamson.

I presented to Lord Arlington an order from the Treasury Commissioners to
Sir Rob. Long, requiring him to issue a warrant for my half-year's pension,
the whole amounting to 1,166/. 13s. 4d. a year,
upon which Sir Robert made a certificate, which is annexed to the order in his
lordship’s hands, saying that as the privy seal directs my payment from the
Customs, they cannot order it elsewhere.

As the pension is my only means of subsistence, and a year and a half is due,
pray use your interest with his lordship, that I may obtain an effectual order for striking tallies of assignment upon the Customs, for the arrears of the pension, and for its future payment.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 248, No. 26.]

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Oct. 20 1668.
Sam. Tooker to Williamson.

I heard from Sir George Downing that the Treasury Commissioners desired to
speak with me;
I was prevented going, and wrote by Capt. Stampe that although their lordships had reduced me from 400/. a year, promised by Sir John Lawson, his Majesty's Admiral — whose word ought to be observed to 100/. a year, yet I was willing to accept it, provided they paid it from the time I was re-established by Sir John Lawson, on 18 Oct. 1661.

The answer is that their lordships will advise with Lord Arlington about it.

Pray put in a favourable word for gaining the 600/. in arrear;
I will give you 50 pieces for your pains.
[S.P. Dom., Car. II. 248, No. 27.]

Tonyel  •  Link

'but what makes him leave them with the most contentedness is the knowledge of his own integrity and just dealings.'

What a splendid parting line as you sweep out of the door!

Stephane Chenard  •  Link

"Understand", Sam tells the new girl, "you are to stay only till I get that coach, then we'll get a boy. For what could such a delightful maiden as you understand of mechanicks, eh? Urgh, urgh, urgh".

New Girl duly blushes, pretty hands entwined and eyes downcast. "Of course, Sir. 'Twouldn't be proper, Sir". New Girl also thinks, *No way I'd wanna be around that cheapo clunker you're gonna buy anyway, you miser. Now, if you'd gone for a Bellingham with Mr. Hooke's thoroughbrace suspension, I'd have stuck for that and maybe even brought my toolbag...*

Kew Gardener  •  Link

@Sarah. Re. Earl of Nottingham. The papers are probably referring to Charles Howard, 3rd Earl of Nottingham, brother of Charles Howard the 2nd Earl, and son of Charles Howard, the 1st Earl. He had a reputation for wildness and married badly. When he died the earldom was recreated for the Finch family.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Howard,_3rd…

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